Influence Of Postmodern Dance Cultural Studies Essay

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Postmodernism was a late 20th century movement that opposed the Modernist preoccupation with purity of form and technique, and aimed to eradicate the divisions between art, popular culture, and the media. Postmodern artists employed influences from an array of past movements, applying them to modern forms. Postmodernists embraced diversity and rejected the distinction between "high" and "low" art. Ignoring genre boundaries, the movement encourages the mix of ideas, medias, and forms to promote parody, humor, and irony.

http://wwar.com/masters/movements/postmodernism.html

-started 1960s in a church

-the word postmodern after modern techniques Graham n Isadora

-influced by Cunningham n cage

-timely, moving on today

Where Modernists tended to believe in the future and reject the past, Postmodernists are more pessimistic and do not see the world necessarily improving in the future.

Read more: The History of Postmodernism | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5410185_history-postmodernism.html#ixzz0xKLXPgRg

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1960-1970s eventhough it was short time

Postmodernist music includes Philip Glass's minimalist works and John Cage's collaborative performances in which he involved the audience.

Read more: The History of Postmodernism | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5410185_history-postmodernism.html#ixzz0xKLurk4H

genres like ballet and modernism and develop new styles. The most famous of these pioneers was probably Anna Halprin, who based her choreography on real experiences, not classical works. Her group, the Dancers Workshop, usually avoided traditional technique and often performed outdoors instead of on a conventional stage. Another modern dance pioneer, Robert Dunn, believed that the process of art was more significant than the end product. Merce Cunningham experimented with the relationship between dance and music and created choreography that was unrelated to the music it was accompanied by.

Read more: Post Modern Dance History | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5137732_post-modern-dance-history.html#ixzz0xKMK1mAH

What Followed Postmodernism?

Postmodern dance was a relatively short-lived movement, but it was a stepping stone to other artistic endeavors. Performance art, a movement featuring theatrical events realized through loosely structured combinations of events, grew out of the collaboration between dance and other art forms. Dancers like Twyla Tharp put their own stamp on postmodern theory and began a return to more structured choreography, making way for the contemporary dance genre of today.

Read more: Post Modern Dance History | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5137732_post-modern-dance-history.html#ixzz0xKMT9iq5

Postmodern dance is a 20th century concert dance form. A reaction to the compositional and presentation constraints of modern dance, postmodern dance hailed the use of everyday movement as valid performance art and advocated novel methods of dance composition.

Claiming that any movement was dance, and any person was a dancer (with or without training) early postmodern dance was more closely aligned with ideology of modernism rather than the architectural, literary and design movements of postmodernism. However, the postmodern dance movement rapidly developed to embrace the ideology of postmodernism which was reflected in the wide variety of dance works emerging from Judson Dance Theater, the home of postmodern dance.[citation needed]

Lasting from the 1960s to the 1970s the main thrust of Postmodern dance was relatively short lived but its legacy lives on in contemporary dance (a blend of modernism and postmodernism) and the rise of postmodernist choreographic processes that have produced a wide range of dance works in varying styles.

Contents [hide]

1 The influence of postmodern dance

2 The postmodern choreographic process

3 Founders of postmodern dance

4 See also

5 Further reading

[edit]

The influence of postmodern dance

This section does not cite any references or sources.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2009)

Postmodern dance led to:

contemporary dance

dance improvisation

contact improvisation

dance for camera

the concept of all movement as dance

the postmodern choreographic process

see also: 20th century concert dance

[edit]

The postmodern choreographic process

The postmodern choreographic process may reflect the following elements:

post-structuralism / deconstructivism

parody

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irony

jouissance

hyperreality

Death of the Author

see also: choreographic technique

[edit]

Founders of postmodern dance

the founders of postmodern dance are

Merce Cunningham (who came before postmodern dance per se but used a postmodern choreographic process)

Robert Ellis Dunn (who taught composition at the Cunningham school)

the members of the Judson Dance Theater

Alwin Nikolais

Murray Louis

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postmodern_dance

Postmodern art is a term used to describe an art movement which was thought to be in contradiction to some aspect of modernism, or to have emerged or developed in its aftermath. In general, movements such as Intermedia, Installation art, Conceptual Art and Multimedia, particularly involving video are described as postmodern. The traits associated with the use of the term postmodern in art include bricolage, use of words prominently as the central artistic element, collage, simplification, appropriation, depiction of consumer or popular culture and Performance art.

Contents [hide]

1 Use of the term

2 Defining postmodern art

3 Avant-garde precursors

3.1 Dada

4 Radical movements in modern art

4.1 Jackson Pollock and abstract expressionism

4.2 After abstract expressionism

4.3 Performance art and happenings

4.4 Assemblage art

4.5 Pop art

4.6 Fluxus

4.7 Minimalism

4.8 Postminimalism

5 Movements in postmodern art

5.1 New Classicism

5.2 Conceptual art

5.3 Installation art

5.4 Lowbrow art

5.5 Performance art

5.6 Intermedia and multi-media

5.7 Appropriation art and neo-conceptual art

5.8 Neo-expressionism and painting

5.9 Institutional critique

6 See also