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Should Free Speech Have a Limit?

1507 words (6 pages) Essay in Society

18/05/20 Society Reference this

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Should Free Speech Have a Limit

Freedom of expression is a fundamental human right. It reinforces all other human rights, allowing society to develop and progress. The ability to express our opinion and speak freely is essential to bring about change in society. However, college campuses and high schools have been limiting this right. For example, in the Gale research database, there’s an article about a California high school that planned a protest to respond to the walkouts of other schools for new gun control. Basically, it states how it is okay to protest about gun control, but when it comes to something such as abortion, everyone goes crazy and it’s not allowed. This is a restriction to free speech. Free speech is the right to express information, ideas, and opinions free of restrictions. Free speech and student activism is critical in the present period of despise and division, and organizations for learning are ideal to prepare people in the best way to explore establishments of life. In the event that we don’t permit understudies the space and office to figure out how to advocate for issues that they find significant, how might we best set them up to question and better the structures of the world we live in? Smothering that organization is, in itself, extremist. Although some people might say that there should be a limit to what students are allowed to say on college campuses, you need to consider the fact that there is no limit on the First Amendment. Student activism and free speech on campus should not have limits because college is supposed to be a safe place.  It’s supposed to be a place where we can speak our minds freely. It’s okay to have feedback good or bad, it’s better to let things out than keep it inside.

Limitations on speech by college campuses add up to government oversight, infringing upon the Constitution. Such limitations deny students of their entitlement to welcome speech they wish to hear, banter addresses with which they deviate, and dissent discourse they discover extremist or hostile. An open society relies upon liberal training, and the entire enterprise of liberal instruction is established on the rule of free speech. For example, an article from the Gale Opposing Viewpoints Online Collection talks about a school in California responds to the walkouts around the world that students in school organize to protest gun violence. This discussion has come to many schools to due the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. In a classroom discussion at the California high school, a history teacher asked her class if the school and media would support a walkout if they were protesting about abortion and not gun violence. The inquiry made students interested to design an anti- abortion student walkout to both exercise their First Amendment rights and to test their instructor’s proposal that a few causes get less positive open consideration than others. The students national pro-life walkout was hung on April 11, 2018. However, the instructor was put on leave. The amount we value of free speech being a privilege is put to its severest test when the speaker is protecting something that most people think shouldn’t be put out there, but rather something that should be kept to oneself. Speech that profoundly annoys our ethical quality or is unfriendly to our lifestyle warrants a similar sacred security as other speech due to the fact that the privilege of free speech is inseparable

School grounds around the nation have encountered significant student protests. These students guarantee that schools advance antagonistic conditions that mischief minority students and hinder their capacity to learn. To take care of these issues, students have requested that school administrators and personnel make “safe-spaces” in which hostile or obnoxious speech is prohibited and rebuffed. In the article, The Coddling of the American Mind, they talk more about safe spaces and how college campuses are trying to enforce these spaces.  “The ultimate aim, it seems, is to turn campuses into “ safe spaces” where young adults are shielded from words and ideas that make some uncomfortable” (Lukianoff and Haidt 264). These requests have started banter about the idea of free speech, singular rights, and advanced education. The article from Gale database that we were informed to choose from is about a California high school that protests to the walkouts of schools for gun control laws. It started with Stoneman Douglas High School and then the protests went around about changing the ways of schools restrictions on guns and police. Basically, it states how it is okay to protest about gun control but not okay to protest proudly about abortion. To most people, this is restricting the right to free speech. It should also be taken into account that this was all conducted in a classroom of regular high school students and the students are the ones protesting or responding to how free speech should be and how it is stated in the First Amendment. The protest, in opinion, was to teach the students that it is okay to get hate feedback, but it is also okay to speak your mind freely, especially at school. College campuses have a limit to free speech and there shouldn’t be. Everyone can say what they want when they want because we are aloud to. There aren’t any restrictions because we know when to stop, at least most of us. It’s putting a limit to the First Amendment, which shouldn’t be there.

The right to speak freely is a major American opportunity and a human right, and there’s no spot that this privilege should be more esteemed and ensured than America’s schools and colleges. A college exists to teach students the advance the frontiers of human information, and does as such by going about as a “commercial center of thoughts” where thoughts compete in discussion. The scholarly imperativeness of a college relies upon this challenge: something that can’t occur appropriately when students or employees dread discipline for communicating sees that may be disagreeable with general society everywhere or disfavored by college managers. All things considered, the right to speak freely of discourse is under nonstop danger at huge numbers of America’s grounds, pushed aside for governmental issues, comfort, or basically a longing to keep away from discussion. Accordingly, discourse codes directing what might be stated, “free discourse zones” binding school free discourse to little regions of grounds, and regulatory endeavors to rebuff or curb grounds free discourse on a case-by-case premise are regular today in the scholarly community.

Generally, advanced education was committed to instructing elites and preparing the up and coming age of political, strict and monetary leaders. In ongoing decades, however, colleges around the world paved the way for incorporating a developing number of students, a large number of whom have a place in gatherings that were never recently thought to be acceptable. The variety of the college network today isn’t simply a consequence of evolving socioeconomics, yet in truth mirrors an extension of the college’s strategies. Colleges have developed from an establishment that serves a little portion of the population to one that fills in as a motor for social portability and equivalent chance. However, colleges still have a breaking point to where they aren’t okay with what the diversity of people want to speak freely without hesitation.

Initially, anybody legally present on an open school grounds has the privilege to talk in an open zone of grounds, as long as they don’t interfere with another person’s entitlement to the equivalent. Schools should make a promise to free discourse and illuminate all understudies and individuals regarding the grounds network that it’s not the school’s business to shield anybody from thoughts they don’t care for. You have as much right to discuss a theme as to overlook a welcomed speaker.

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