Traditional And Modern Music Of Malta Film Studies Essay

3531 words (14 pages) Essay

1st Jan 1970 Film Studies Reference this

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Maltese folk music is intrinsic to the culture of the country and is valued worldwide since it is sung in English (Zahra & Borg, 2006). Over the years, interest In Maltese Music has spread significantly. In 17 century, Malta was an influential place where musicians and publishers recorded music. The 18th century was certainly the Golden Age of Maltese music. Moreover, music life of the island was divided and focused on the Manoel Theatre in Valletta, St. Paul`s cathedral in Mdina and Conventual Church of the Order, St. Johns in Valletta (Bruni, 1998).

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It is undeniable that Malta and Italy made a great influence to each other. The first study to deal with Maltese music and its relations with Italy was in 1929. In spite of its drawback due to absence of historical proof Rolandi`s research Is the only extensive survey of Maltese music and culture among the few works on this topic (Sansone, 2001).

Also, during the last decade Professor O Aquilina and then in 1942, Capt. Busuttil in his Gabra ta` Qwiel Maltin, made a beneficial contribution to the research of Maltese songs (Pullicino & Aquilina, 1947).

Ghana

The primary traditional Maltese music is Ghana. Ghana verses are represented by a mixture of Sicilian ballad and Arabic tune (Cassar, 2010).

With the time the way people sing Ghana has been modernised. Some published song texts and written notes about Ghana are more than 100 years old. It is believed that today’s Ghana is very similar to the one that has been formerly written and performed, however, it can be noticed that some developments over an ancient form took place, music has adapted to the changes within a society. In 1909 Bertha Ilg and Hans Stumme have published the largest collection of lyrics that has ever been gathered (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

The villagers enjoyed singing the Ghana versions from Stumme and Ilg, both at work and their own spare times. And a lot of people, who grew up before the 1960s in Malta, still remember that they enjoyed singing these versions as a child (Casha, 1994). Depending on people’s moods, they could improvise the way they sang the songs. But usually they sang textbook quatrains which they selected according to one’s mood. Rather than improvising the words, the voice was far more important and also many different instruments were involved in the music (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Up until the 1960s, Ghana changed considerably towards a version about modern times. This change was reflected in the way Ghana was sung. Another change was that Ghana became more popular throughout Malta even with the middle class. This was largely due to a folklore festival, first organised by Guze Cassar Pullicino in 1953. Middle class people started realising that Ghana was more folklore and not just singing songs by the lower class (Zahra & Borg, 2006). Since then Ghana became music for the popular events of the middle class.

The change was bigger among the working classes. The influence of the radio made Ghana more widespread. New listeners to Ghana heard ballads, laments and satire, all about a changing society, where old lifestyles and values were disappearing. A militant Labour Party invited people to Ghana sessions to win them over. Also, it was the time of Maltese people emigrating to Australia, Canada and they listened to Ghana recordings. Famous Ghana events were recorded on tape and later also on video (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

All of the above changed the role of the Ghannej, as they now performed in bars, where men judged their skilful art in silence.

Types of Ghana

Nowadays there are three types of Ghana distinguished among others:

Spirtu Pront

Tal-Fatt

Fil-Gholi

Ghana Spirtu Pront

Today the most popular form of Ghana is Spirtu Pront. This is a song battle between two singers known as Ghannejja. The singers try to make their point in the argument and it is important to rhyme perfectly. The arguments are interrupted by guitar parts, thus, giving the singers an opportunity to create new rhymes (Cassar, 2010). Moreover, there is a prize for exceptional vocabulary, repartee or metaphor. Though the spectators should follow the rules and show their gratitude only when the duel is over. Today, Spirtu Pront is the most popular type of Ghana and such duels usually are organized in bars and are not advertised in the media (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Ghana Fatt

Ghana Fatt is usually melancholic. In this form of Ghana, the Ghannej recounts a tale of a tragic event (Cassar, 2010).

In this type of Ghana only one singer is involved. In the olden days, between 50-100 years ago, songs were composed and published by more educated people and only then Ghannejja sung them, though, in our days lyrics are often written and then performed by the same person. Moreover, today it is popular to transform the local poetry, legends and ballads into Ghana-Fatt. The Ghannejja of today write their own lyrics, and some are influenced by Maltese poetry. Because there is a resemblance between the poetry and Ghana Tal-Fatt, especially the way it rhymes and the way the metre goes (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Fattijiet always are about morals, so the singer uses simple values to share them with the audience. As opposed to before, when Fattijiet was sang on holidays, feasts and picnics, today people listen Ghana Fatt not only on festivals, but also via cd’s, radio and mp3 players (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Ghana Fil-Gholi

This type of Ghana is also called La Bormliza. The meaning of the word Fil-Gholi is: high-pitched; while the town of Bormla gives its name to La Bormliza.

Fil-Gholi used to be sung by groups of women who were doing chores together. Some men have sung it, trying to reach high enough notes. You do not really hear it much these days (Zahra & Borg, 2006), and unfotunately, today there is a small number of places in Malta where Fil-Gholi is sang (Cassar, 2010).

La Bormliza really brings out the melodious use of the voice, accompanied by a guitar. It feels like the audience is drawn into this melodiously sung songs. Unlike in Spirtu Pront, in Fil-Gholi people are enchanted with the music and the lyrics do not matter that much (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Modern Ghana

The last decade was crucial in history of Ghana. During the first part of twentieth century no one could imagine that Ghannejja would be estimated at one’s true worth, moreover, it was inaugurated by the Head of the State (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

It is important to remember that ghana is considered as a true music of Malta and highly conserved as an inalienable part of culture. Some composers and musicians have arranged fame Ghana melodies in various stages and recorded them, as well. Above all, it enables to save precious history of Ghana development, makes it eternal and keeps it for younger generation and fans. It goes without saying that the more ghana gain popularity and general recognition the merrier it attracts young Ghannejja and bring into line (Casha, 1994).

Earlier music was linked to the frame of the Roman Catholic Mass, wedding songs and once was movingly performed at the funeral of Fredu Abela Il-Bamboccu, one of the greatest Ghana singers. GÄana Festival was organised in 1998 by the Ministry of Culture. Nowadays, Gorg Mifsud-Chircop, famous folklorist, manages to organize this annual event. The festival has made a great contribution to the modern music, assisted novice talanted singers, revealed female ghannejjas and also acquired vogue. Some ghannejja musicians still trying to experiment with music style, rhetoric musical instruments and subjects. It is vital to note that twentieth century progress has made a great influence on gÄana melodies, that is why since 1998 when the first website was designed for Maltese folk music by John J. Cassar, gÄana has covered the internet (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Many musicians took part in development of ghana, such as Charles Camilleri, who has revealed the essence of classical music on his works; Vince Pulo who has promoted ghana in his recorded works on television and radio, Evarist Azzopardi, Laurie Bugeja and others. The main issue that may bother people is fate of this music stream in the future; For all that the skill should be pass on to the future generation to avoid a terrible loss. Moreover, Frans Baldaccino was first ghannejja singer who has introduced theatre the novel side, side of gÄana music. By dint of his works he create a new life of gÄana culture. „Budaj” became a new trend that had influenced even oversea cultures. The popularity was growing and he has managed to record his first Ghana CD. That time he had his own band of Karmenu Bonnici (II-Bahri), second Ghannej singer, and guitarists: Jon Saliba and Manwel Panis (Casha, 1994).

Music between yesterday and today

Between the XIX and the XX century the whole World started its evolution with the new technology. As results the music followed its steps. In fact, without forgetting the importance of folk and popular music, new musicians find their way to express their self in the “new type” of music called Modern. In addition the instrumental traditions of the people, such as farmers and fishermen, allow European instruments to take their place.

As Charles Baudelaire said “The music, other language dear to the lazy and deep souls who seek recreation in the diversity of employment, will talk about you, tells you about the poem of your life”. Maltese Local cultural history represents an enigma to artists today who look for their own creativeness in the Maltese folk heritage and some Maltese musicians interpret their “Poem of your life “as a link with their culture.

One example of that is Etnika, a group of Maltese artists would like to popularize the traditional Maltese music. Since 2004 Ruben Zahra, Steve Borg, Guzi Gatt and Andrew Alamango built old instruments and searched melodies, rhythms and musical text forgotten in the old archives. Three songs also include Arabian melody with Maltese folk music on a basis of West European harmony. These songs join different type of instrument: from clarinet, violin piano to electric guitar and drum kit. These variations bring a dynamic and explosive quality of these three tunes because they include parts of rock with parts of folk music.

They found their inspiration in the Maltese folk music and they became famous in the last year because Etnika participated at Etnikafe, held annually and other Mediterranean festivals.

This is just an example of a music mix between the past and the present. This shows how Folk music is an inspiration for modern artist because they sustain to be link with the past and from there they build the present with new contemporary music.

(http://www.rootsworld.com/reviews/etnika.shtml)

Maltese artists around the world

In general, artists are pushed to travel away from their country by making known their talent and their music internationally. During the last century, the majority of the artists follow this way and they travel all around the world improving their skills and expanding their knowledge of music. This happen especially in small country as Malta because popular singer want to let the world know about their history and their country traditions.

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Charles Camilleri is one of these types of artists. He was born in Malta in 1931 and his father was valid musician in his small country. The young Charles began his way along the paths of art from an early age learning the styles of popular music and began performing improvising on various instruments. At 15, he composed his first melody about Maltese traditions which was played in the orchestra. After he left his studies, he dedicated his life to the music and born his global vision of the music where he defined as “metaphysical entity without space and time osmotically flows through the Earth, Man, Space and the Universe”. Charles begins to travel around the world, introducing in his compositions the folklore of all the places he visited. After studying at the Conservatory in Canada, his fate offers him a beautiful musical scene where he and his huge corpus created almost 300 compositions. After his experience abroad he decided to return to his homeland, Malta, and he became a music lecturer at the university. In addition, in 2006 he also became a member of the “Malta council for culture.” The 9th January 2009 Charles Camilleri died in Malta aged 77, four days before his last composition, “New Idea Symphony”, is premiered in Brussels. Of this great Maltese author, his fans surely remember his magnificent organ concert (favorite instrument of the author) in 1983 with other songs like “Wine of Peace”, “L’amour de Dieu” and “Invocation to the Creator”. In addition, Charles Camilleri is in the recent news: in fact as the Sunday Times of 23th December 2012 write, “Mrs Camilleri decided to donate her late husband’s music scores to Malta’s National Archives… Camilleri’s reputation helped put Malta on the international music map and … his music belongs to Malta as much as it belongs to the world mainstream” [1] .

(http://xoomer.virgilio.it/fborsari/arretra/personaggi/comp21.html)

Much more modern than Charles Camilleri and completely different from him is Fabrizio Faniello, another Maltese artist who looked for fortune reached Italy and becoming famous there. Fabrizio has Italian parents and before he discovered his talent for music, he dedicated himself to the sport, specifically in football. During his career he also participated in the Maltese selections for the Eurovision Song Contest but he only reached the fourth place. Fabrizio Faniello is a pop artist who has a very strong feeling with the Italian peninsula: in fact one of his famous songs, “così semplice” is written in Italian also if he is Maltese. In 2010, his fame became important enough to participate in the selection of “Sanremo Giovani”, a very important Italian festival that present all the song from the best Italian artists (Dove c’e musica, 2011).

From the small Maltese island, many artists decide to travel around the world bringing with them their culture, their traditions and introducing new music to other countries. The Travelling, however, is not becomes a way to forget their homeland but it is an alternative for introducing a bit of Malta anywhere.

Maltese music festival

As many tourism web sites shows, Malta has a continue holiday mood during the hole year. This is determined by a huge number of national and international festivals and important concert which take place in Malta.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Maltese_musical_festivals)

One of the most important international events is the Jazz festival. This event is organized by the Malta Council for Culture and the Arts and it is held annually since 1990 during the third weekend of July .These are three Mediterranean nights where Latin and classic International jazz is played by the most famous musicians in a truly unique setting. In fact, it take place in the picturesque backdrop of Ta’ Liesse in Valletta’s Grand under the ramparts of the sixteenth century close to the Grand Harbor. In the story of this special event, there was a transformation in 2006. The event was subtracted from its tradition and from the management of Charles Gatt “City”, director and founder of the festival. Therefore it was assigned into the hands of the private N’G’N company who tried to change the conventional style of the festival, transforming it into a “Rock and Jazz Festival”. But, conversely to their expectative, the event had less success. Consequently, in 2009 the traditional “International Jazz festival” was returned to its roots and was an incredible success. To conclude, as MCCA said: “Malta International Jazz Festival is known as a hub for the exchange of musical experience”.

(http://www.maltaculture.com/content.aspx?id=185294). This implies that the host population, the Maltese people, enjoy this festival and they cooperate each year to improve their music culture more and more.

http://www.maltaculture.com/content.aspx?id=185294

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malta_Jazz_Festival

Another important European music event was the “Malta song for Europe” where the contest’s organizer is the PBS Malta (Public Broadcasting Services). The music event nationally selects who will represent Malta in the Eurovision Song contest. This contest is an annual competition founded in 1956 and organized by the European Broadcasting Union. Malta participated for the first time in 1971. During the seventies, however, it participates only twice, in 1972 and 1975 but it returned in 1991. Since then it has taken part in all editions achieving good results. These songs were all sung in English except for the first two, which were sung in Maltese. Malta song for Europe is important for Maltese because they choose who will represent them at the European level by competing with 26 other nations. Moreover, through this festival Malta makes known its own characteristics and skills in whole world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malta_Song_for_Europe

In addition to these international events there are others nationals such as “Malta folk music festival”. This is held in 3 days during the first week of June and, as the “jazz festival” and it is organized by Malta Council for Culture and the Arts. The Malta Mediterranean Folk Music Festival is a wonderful festival of Mediterranean folk music which different types of Ghana songs are played by Maltese folk groups and folk musicians from neighboring Mediterranean countries such as Morocco, Spain and Greece. Furthermore the festival also offers special activities for children and a big number of traditional instruments seminars. In fact, the Maltese are very attached to their culture and traditions and live in a constant state of feast imitating the origins of their folk songs (Arts, 2012).

These are just a small part of the musical events that the Maltese island offers. There are many festivals organized by local television broadcast, such as the “Isle of MTV”, “MTV music Award” and all the popular festivals which take place in each city in Malta.

In general music festivals and events promote tourism in Malta and offer the chance for young people to meet and continue their culture and tradition participating in the Maltese cultural festivals.

Contemporary Maltese music

Many people were concerned with a question what Maltese music is? One of the ways to present it is to get to know albums that were written by Maltese bands in their native language. There are three of them which can be identified as underground music that you won`t hear on the radio (D’Emanuele, 2009).

The Brikkuni`s album which called “Kuntrabanda” is an example of Maltese music and contemporary Mediterranean culture. The band is considered as superb and if you are into music, you won`t pass over the performance to enjoy the authentic voice of local dwellers of the island.

Music of the band Xtruppaw sounds punk but it is ranged from continuous rock to country. Their single ‘Diska Cool GÄar-Radio’ (A Cool Song for Radio) was still quite successful, which is ironically written about the politically lyrics just to be heard on the radio, although their streetwise lyrics are offensive.

3. Album from the annul L-Ghana tal-Poplu (‘The Song of the People’) contains songs from different singers. This festival is different from the others because all singers are singing live which feels acoustic and real.

(D’Emanuele, 2009)

Maltese folk music is intrinsic to the culture of the country and is valued worldwide since it is sung in English (Zahra & Borg, 2006). Over the years, interest In Maltese Music has spread significantly. In 17 century, Malta was an influential place where musicians and publishers recorded music. The 18th century was certainly the Golden Age of Maltese music. Moreover, music life of the island was divided and focused on the Manoel Theatre in Valletta, St. Paul`s cathedral in Mdina and Conventual Church of the Order, St. Johns in Valletta (Bruni, 1998).

It is undeniable that Malta and Italy made a great influence to each other. The first study to deal with Maltese music and its relations with Italy was in 1929. In spite of its drawback due to absence of historical proof Rolandi`s research Is the only extensive survey of Maltese music and culture among the few works on this topic (Sansone, 2001).

Also, during the last decade Professor O Aquilina and then in 1942, Capt. Busuttil in his Gabra ta` Qwiel Maltin, made a beneficial contribution to the research of Maltese songs (Pullicino & Aquilina, 1947).

Ghana

The primary traditional Maltese music is Ghana. Ghana verses are represented by a mixture of Sicilian ballad and Arabic tune (Cassar, 2010).

With the time the way people sing Ghana has been modernised. Some published song texts and written notes about Ghana are more than 100 years old. It is believed that today’s Ghana is very similar to the one that has been formerly written and performed, however, it can be noticed that some developments over an ancient form took place, music has adapted to the changes within a society. In 1909 Bertha Ilg and Hans Stumme have published the largest collection of lyrics that has ever been gathered (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

The villagers enjoyed singing the Ghana versions from Stumme and Ilg, both at work and their own spare times. And a lot of people, who grew up before the 1960s in Malta, still remember that they enjoyed singing these versions as a child (Casha, 1994). Depending on people’s moods, they could improvise the way they sang the songs. But usually they sang textbook quatrains which they selected according to one’s mood. Rather than improvising the words, the voice was far more important and also many different instruments were involved in the music (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Up until the 1960s, Ghana changed considerably towards a version about modern times. This change was reflected in the way Ghana was sung. Another change was that Ghana became more popular throughout Malta even with the middle class. This was largely due to a folklore festival, first organised by Guze Cassar Pullicino in 1953. Middle class people started realising that Ghana was more folklore and not just singing songs by the lower class (Zahra & Borg, 2006). Since then Ghana became music for the popular events of the middle class.

The change was bigger among the working classes. The influence of the radio made Ghana more widespread. New listeners to Ghana heard ballads, laments and satire, all about a changing society, where old lifestyles and values were disappearing. A militant Labour Party invited people to Ghana sessions to win them over. Also, it was the time of Maltese people emigrating to Australia, Canada and they listened to Ghana recordings. Famous Ghana events were recorded on tape and later also on video (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

All of the above changed the role of the Ghannej, as they now performed in bars, where men judged their skilful art in silence.

Types of Ghana

Nowadays there are three types of Ghana distinguished among others:

Spirtu Pront

Tal-Fatt

Fil-Gholi

Ghana Spirtu Pront

Today the most popular form of Ghana is Spirtu Pront. This is a song battle between two singers known as Ghannejja. The singers try to make their point in the argument and it is important to rhyme perfectly. The arguments are interrupted by guitar parts, thus, giving the singers an opportunity to create new rhymes (Cassar, 2010). Moreover, there is a prize for exceptional vocabulary, repartee or metaphor. Though the spectators should follow the rules and show their gratitude only when the duel is over. Today, Spirtu Pront is the most popular type of Ghana and such duels usually are organized in bars and are not advertised in the media (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Ghana Fatt

Ghana Fatt is usually melancholic. In this form of Ghana, the Ghannej recounts a tale of a tragic event (Cassar, 2010).

In this type of Ghana only one singer is involved. In the olden days, between 50-100 years ago, songs were composed and published by more educated people and only then Ghannejja sung them, though, in our days lyrics are often written and then performed by the same person. Moreover, today it is popular to transform the local poetry, legends and ballads into Ghana-Fatt. The Ghannejja of today write their own lyrics, and some are influenced by Maltese poetry. Because there is a resemblance between the poetry and Ghana Tal-Fatt, especially the way it rhymes and the way the metre goes (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Fattijiet always are about morals, so the singer uses simple values to share them with the audience. As opposed to before, when Fattijiet was sang on holidays, feasts and picnics, today people listen Ghana Fatt not only on festivals, but also via cd’s, radio and mp3 players (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Ghana Fil-Gholi

This type of Ghana is also called La Bormliza. The meaning of the word Fil-Gholi is: high-pitched; while the town of Bormla gives its name to La Bormliza.

Fil-Gholi used to be sung by groups of women who were doing chores together. Some men have sung it, trying to reach high enough notes. You do not really hear it much these days (Zahra & Borg, 2006), and unfotunately, today there is a small number of places in Malta where Fil-Gholi is sang (Cassar, 2010).

La Bormliza really brings out the melodious use of the voice, accompanied by a guitar. It feels like the audience is drawn into this melodiously sung songs. Unlike in Spirtu Pront, in Fil-Gholi people are enchanted with the music and the lyrics do not matter that much (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Modern Ghana

The last decade was crucial in history of Ghana. During the first part of twentieth century no one could imagine that Ghannejja would be estimated at one’s true worth, moreover, it was inaugurated by the Head of the State (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

It is important to remember that ghana is considered as a true music of Malta and highly conserved as an inalienable part of culture. Some composers and musicians have arranged fame Ghana melodies in various stages and recorded them, as well. Above all, it enables to save precious history of Ghana development, makes it eternal and keeps it for younger generation and fans. It goes without saying that the more ghana gain popularity and general recognition the merrier it attracts young Ghannejja and bring into line (Casha, 1994).

Earlier music was linked to the frame of the Roman Catholic Mass, wedding songs and once was movingly performed at the funeral of Fredu Abela Il-Bamboccu, one of the greatest Ghana singers. GÄana Festival was organised in 1998 by the Ministry of Culture. Nowadays, Gorg Mifsud-Chircop, famous folklorist, manages to organize this annual event. The festival has made a great contribution to the modern music, assisted novice talanted singers, revealed female ghannejjas and also acquired vogue. Some ghannejja musicians still trying to experiment with music style, rhetoric musical instruments and subjects. It is vital to note that twentieth century progress has made a great influence on gÄana melodies, that is why since 1998 when the first website was designed for Maltese folk music by John J. Cassar, gÄana has covered the internet (Zahra & Borg, 2006).

Many musicians took part in development of ghana, such as Charles Camilleri, who has revealed the essence of classical music on his works; Vince Pulo who has promoted ghana in his recorded works on television and radio, Evarist Azzopardi, Laurie Bugeja and others. The main issue that may bother people is fate of this music stream in the future; For all that the skill should be pass on to the future generation to avoid a terrible loss. Moreover, Frans Baldaccino was first ghannejja singer who has introduced theatre the novel side, side of gÄana music. By dint of his works he create a new life of gÄana culture. „Budaj” became a new trend that had influenced even oversea cultures. The popularity was growing and he has managed to record his first Ghana CD. That time he had his own band of Karmenu Bonnici (II-Bahri), second Ghannej singer, and guitarists: Jon Saliba and Manwel Panis (Casha, 1994).

Music between yesterday and today

Between the XIX and the XX century the whole World started its evolution with the new technology. As results the music followed its steps. In fact, without forgetting the importance of folk and popular music, new musicians find their way to express their self in the “new type” of music called Modern. In addition the instrumental traditions of the people, such as farmers and fishermen, allow European instruments to take their place.

As Charles Baudelaire said “The music, other language dear to the lazy and deep souls who seek recreation in the diversity of employment, will talk about you, tells you about the poem of your life”. Maltese Local cultural history represents an enigma to artists today who look for their own creativeness in the Maltese folk heritage and some Maltese musicians interpret their “Poem of your life “as a link with their culture.

One example of that is Etnika, a group of Maltese artists would like to popularize the traditional Maltese music. Since 2004 Ruben Zahra, Steve Borg, Guzi Gatt and Andrew Alamango built old instruments and searched melodies, rhythms and musical text forgotten in the old archives. Three songs also include Arabian melody with Maltese folk music on a basis of West European harmony. These songs join different type of instrument: from clarinet, violin piano to electric guitar and drum kit. These variations bring a dynamic and explosive quality of these three tunes because they include parts of rock with parts of folk music.

They found their inspiration in the Maltese folk music and they became famous in the last year because Etnika participated at Etnikafe, held annually and other Mediterranean festivals.

This is just an example of a music mix between the past and the present. This shows how Folk music is an inspiration for modern artist because they sustain to be link with the past and from there they build the present with new contemporary music.

(http://www.rootsworld.com/reviews/etnika.shtml)

Maltese artists around the world

In general, artists are pushed to travel away from their country by making known their talent and their music internationally. During the last century, the majority of the artists follow this way and they travel all around the world improving their skills and expanding their knowledge of music. This happen especially in small country as Malta because popular singer want to let the world know about their history and their country traditions.

Charles Camilleri is one of these types of artists. He was born in Malta in 1931 and his father was valid musician in his small country. The young Charles began his way along the paths of art from an early age learning the styles of popular music and began performing improvising on various instruments. At 15, he composed his first melody about Maltese traditions which was played in the orchestra. After he left his studies, he dedicated his life to the music and born his global vision of the music where he defined as “metaphysical entity without space and time osmotically flows through the Earth, Man, Space and the Universe”. Charles begins to travel around the world, introducing in his compositions the folklore of all the places he visited. After studying at the Conservatory in Canada, his fate offers him a beautiful musical scene where he and his huge corpus created almost 300 compositions. After his experience abroad he decided to return to his homeland, Malta, and he became a music lecturer at the university. In addition, in 2006 he also became a member of the “Malta council for culture.” The 9th January 2009 Charles Camilleri died in Malta aged 77, four days before his last composition, “New Idea Symphony”, is premiered in Brussels. Of this great Maltese author, his fans surely remember his magnificent organ concert (favorite instrument of the author) in 1983 with other songs like “Wine of Peace”, “L’amour de Dieu” and “Invocation to the Creator”. In addition, Charles Camilleri is in the recent news: in fact as the Sunday Times of 23th December 2012 write, “Mrs Camilleri decided to donate her late husband’s music scores to Malta’s National Archives… Camilleri’s reputation helped put Malta on the international music map and … his music belongs to Malta as much as it belongs to the world mainstream” [1] .

(http://xoomer.virgilio.it/fborsari/arretra/personaggi/comp21.html)

Much more modern than Charles Camilleri and completely different from him is Fabrizio Faniello, another Maltese artist who looked for fortune reached Italy and becoming famous there. Fabrizio has Italian parents and before he discovered his talent for music, he dedicated himself to the sport, specifically in football. During his career he also participated in the Maltese selections for the Eurovision Song Contest but he only reached the fourth place. Fabrizio Faniello is a pop artist who has a very strong feeling with the Italian peninsula: in fact one of his famous songs, “così semplice” is written in Italian also if he is Maltese. In 2010, his fame became important enough to participate in the selection of “Sanremo Giovani”, a very important Italian festival that present all the song from the best Italian artists (Dove c’e musica, 2011).

From the small Maltese island, many artists decide to travel around the world bringing with them their culture, their traditions and introducing new music to other countries. The Travelling, however, is not becomes a way to forget their homeland but it is an alternative for introducing a bit of Malta anywhere.

Maltese music festival

As many tourism web sites shows, Malta has a continue holiday mood during the hole year. This is determined by a huge number of national and international festivals and important concert which take place in Malta.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Maltese_musical_festivals)

One of the most important international events is the Jazz festival. This event is organized by the Malta Council for Culture and the Arts and it is held annually since 1990 during the third weekend of July .These are three Mediterranean nights where Latin and classic International jazz is played by the most famous musicians in a truly unique setting. In fact, it take place in the picturesque backdrop of Ta’ Liesse in Valletta’s Grand under the ramparts of the sixteenth century close to the Grand Harbor. In the story of this special event, there was a transformation in 2006. The event was subtracted from its tradition and from the management of Charles Gatt “City”, director and founder of the festival. Therefore it was assigned into the hands of the private N’G’N company who tried to change the conventional style of the festival, transforming it into a “Rock and Jazz Festival”. But, conversely to their expectative, the event had less success. Consequently, in 2009 the traditional “International Jazz festival” was returned to its roots and was an incredible success. To conclude, as MCCA said: “Malta International Jazz Festival is known as a hub for the exchange of musical experience”.

(http://www.maltaculture.com/content.aspx?id=185294). This implies that the host population, the Maltese people, enjoy this festival and they cooperate each year to improve their music culture more and more.

http://www.maltaculture.com/content.aspx?id=185294

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malta_Jazz_Festival

Another important European music event was the “Malta song for Europe” where the contest’s organizer is the PBS Malta (Public Broadcasting Services). The music event nationally selects who will represent Malta in the Eurovision Song contest. This contest is an annual competition founded in 1956 and organized by the European Broadcasting Union. Malta participated for the first time in 1971. During the seventies, however, it participates only twice, in 1972 and 1975 but it returned in 1991. Since then it has taken part in all editions achieving good results. These songs were all sung in English except for the first two, which were sung in Maltese. Malta song for Europe is important for Maltese because they choose who will represent them at the European level by competing with 26 other nations. Moreover, through this festival Malta makes known its own characteristics and skills in whole world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malta_Song_for_Europe

In addition to these international events there are others nationals such as “Malta folk music festival”. This is held in 3 days during the first week of June and, as the “jazz festival” and it is organized by Malta Council for Culture and the Arts. The Malta Mediterranean Folk Music Festival is a wonderful festival of Mediterranean folk music which different types of Ghana songs are played by Maltese folk groups and folk musicians from neighboring Mediterranean countries such as Morocco, Spain and Greece. Furthermore the festival also offers special activities for children and a big number of traditional instruments seminars. In fact, the Maltese are very attached to their culture and traditions and live in a constant state of feast imitating the origins of their folk songs (Arts, 2012).

These are just a small part of the musical events that the Maltese island offers. There are many festivals organized by local television broadcast, such as the “Isle of MTV”, “MTV music Award” and all the popular festivals which take place in each city in Malta.

In general music festivals and events promote tourism in Malta and offer the chance for young people to meet and continue their culture and tradition participating in the Maltese cultural festivals.

Contemporary Maltese music

Many people were concerned with a question what Maltese music is? One of the ways to present it is to get to know albums that were written by Maltese bands in their native language. There are three of them which can be identified as underground music that you won`t hear on the radio (D’Emanuele, 2009).

The Brikkuni`s album which called “Kuntrabanda” is an example of Maltese music and contemporary Mediterranean culture. The band is considered as superb and if you are into music, you won`t pass over the performance to enjoy the authentic voice of local dwellers of the island.

Music of the band Xtruppaw sounds punk but it is ranged from continuous rock to country. Their single ‘Diska Cool GÄar-Radio’ (A Cool Song for Radio) was still quite successful, which is ironically written about the politically lyrics just to be heard on the radio, although their streetwise lyrics are offensive.

3. Album from the annul L-Ghana tal-Poplu (‘The Song of the People’) contains songs from different singers. This festival is different from the others because all singers are singing live which feels acoustic and real.

(D’Emanuele, 2009)

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