Effects of Naturally Produced Methane from Cattle

1287 words (5 pages) Essay in Environmental Sciences

18/05/20 Environmental Sciences Reference this

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Effects of Naturally Produced Methane from Cattle


Rational:

With the advent of modern science in agriculture from the mid-eighteenth century, researchers began to investigate possibilities for further rises in both plant and animal production systematically. This was essential due to the growing demand for food for an increasingly urbanised European population. Scientists have attempted to comprehend the relationship between soil, plant, climate and fertilization and have recognized the significance of good nutrition and sufficient accommodation for farmed livestock. Examples include Albrecht Daniel (1723-1790) or Adam Smith (1752-1828). The importance of adequate stocking densities was written by Johann Christian Polycarp Erxleben (1744-1777), professor at the University of Göttingen. He asserted that there should be no housing of animal species in primitive shelters. He acknowledged that the air is polluted by high concentrations of noxious gases produced by animals and manure in overstocked animal houses. He argued that it would be better to have barns for ventilation with high ceilings and openings. This may lower the house temperature, which is not harmful to sheep and cattle, but will enhance the quality of the air. He also suggested that cattle be given daylight in barns to improve their health and well-being (Comberg citations, 1984) These suggestions (although not earth-shattering by current standards) obviously show that farm researchers have attempted to apply natural scientific rules to animal farming. Beef cattle were held indoors with hand feeding and urine drainage stalls were installed. Figure 1.1. Wooden model of an ancient Egyptian beef cattle house, Mektire tomb, 11th dynasty, 2134-1991 B.C. From: Benecke (1994) (following H.W. Müller, 1970.

Jürg Rohrer, a famous Professor at the ZHAW School of Life Sciences and Facility Management in the Institute of Natural Resource Sciences once said, “A cow does on average release between 70 and 120 kg of Methane per year. Methane is a greenhouse gas like carbon dioxide (CO2). But the negative effect on the climate of Methane is 23 times higher than the effect of CO2. Therefore the release of about 100 kg Methane per year for each cow is equivalent to about 2’300 kg CO2 per year.” Which leads to global warming and in some seriousness acid rain. Are we feeding them the wrong nourishment? Is it cattle welfare or is the overall quality of the pasture malnourished due to drought conditions. I guess, there’s only one way to reduce the effects of naturally produced methane from Cattle. Carbon farming. Most of us groan at the term but famous cattle farmers like South Gippsland have integrated within their management of agricultural farming practises to maximise the reduction on naturally produced methane and overall carbon emissions in the farming industry from agricultural production in the base stock of cattle in remote Queensland. Today I will be discussing three types of agriculture methods designed to reduce naturally produced methane and overall carbon emissions from cattle; carbon farming, feed additives and

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To begin with before I address the three agricultural methods, I must discuss the importance of naturally produced methane. The methane is produced through a biological change proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations as ‘enteric fermentation’; “Enteric methane production is directly related to the level of intake, the type and quality of feed, the amount of energy consumed, animal size, growth rate, level of production, and environmental temperature. Between 2 to 12% of a ruminant’s energy intake is typically lost through the enteric fermentation process.” Methane is generated as a by-product of the fermentation method by bacteria in the rumen. This CH4 (methane) is inhaled by the animal or belched and accounts for the majority of ruminant emissions.

Carbon farming utilises a variety of agricultural methods designed to segregate atmospheric carbon into the soil through the operational method of sequestration.

Additionally, feed additives such as oils and fats reduce methane emissions by 18% with the strengthening offer of energy and protein. Consequently, feed additives undertake a process of enteric fermentation by entering the cow’s digestive system to break down carbohydrates steamed from microorganisms breaking into further simple molecules for absorption into the bloodstream of the cow. 

 Methanogenic microorganisms that are created by a prokaryotic-metabolic by-product in hypoxic conditions.

Beef cattle farmers produced their own healthy cattle until new agricultural technology such as, motorized equipment, modified housing and biotechnology revolutionised the farming industry.  

Feed additives and carbon farming practises to reduce naturally emitted methane from cattle.

Carbon farming utilises a variety of agricultural methods designed to segregate atmospheric carbon into the soil through the operational method of sequestration. These agricultural methods reduce naturally produced methane from cattle. Additionally, feed additives such as oils and fats reduce methane emissions by 18% with the strengthening offer of energy and protein. Consequently, feed additives undertake a process of enteric fermentation by entering the cow’s digestive system to break down carbohydrates steamed from microorganisms breaking into further simple molecules for absorption into the bloodstream of the cow. 

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Yes, because compare to part 1, the research elaborates on the process of enteric fermentation within the cow and also the method of carbon faming, in that it explains the specific solutions within the topic of carbon farming such as the use of feed additives, which help reduce the effects of naturally produced methane and as a bonus it boosts the cows energy and protein levels. Additionally, it explains how the cows digestive system is broken down into carbohydrates steamed from microorganisms breaking into further simple molecules for absorption into the bloodstream of the cow. 

In conclusion, I reinforce the use of feed additives and multiple agricultural methods due to the benefits such as, boosting energy and protein levels

 

 Conclusion:

The transformation of animal farming towards a greater productivity occurred only when crop rotation started in England (Seidl, 1995). Every year, this scheme of growing a distinct crop on the ground used the soil more effectively and opened the way for systematic manufacturing of fodder or particular grazing fields (Seidl, 1995). In summer, cattle could be held indoors or on specially prepared farms, depending on the farm management and the quality of the soil. Adam Smith (1776, Comberg, 1984) was cited in the United Kingdom stating:‘a grain field of moderate fruitfulness produces a larger amount of food for the population than the best pasture of the same size’. Nevertheless, it was not feasible to leave animal farming altogether because farm animals were urgently required in crop manufacturing as draught animals and their manure as fertilizer (Comberg, 1984).

Animal production will be successful in the future and will be able to reconcile the demands placed on it, such as maintaining a high level of animal health and welfare, consumer safety and environmental protection.

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