Introduction To Deaf Culture Course Syllabus Education Essay

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This is a course to provide students an introduction to the unique aspects of Deaf Culture and Deaf community. This course provides in-depth discussion of the beliefs and customs of this sociolinguistic/cultural minority in relation to language use and history of Deaf people in the United States of America. This course is intended for students who are interested in learning about Deaf Culture and the Deaf community.

III. REQUISITES:

Advisory:

ENGL 051 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent. or Assessment Skill Level W5 &

ENGL 056 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent. or Assessment Skill Level R5

Limitation on Enrollment:

This course is not open to students with previous credit for SPED 104

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

1. Compare and contrast the phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States of

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America as seen from within that cultural group and as observed by people outside it.

2. Discuss, compare and contrast United States Deaf Culture and foreign Deaf Cultures.

3. Differentiate between the various aspects of United States of America Deaf community and

Deaf Culture and United States of America Hearing communities and their culture(s).

4. Examine the relationships between Deaf children and their Deaf parents, Deaf children and

their Hearing parents, and Hearing children and their Deaf parents.

5. Identify some basic values and behaviors of United States of America Deaf people related to

language use; as opposed to sign system usage e.g. sign supported speech such as SEE1,

SEE2; Oral Method; etc.

6. Describe how ASL fits into a linguistic framework and pattern.

7. Describe how American Sign Language fits into the family of human languages.

8. Summarize the historical ideas and perspectives from Hearing people about Deaf people, Deaf

persons' own perspectives about themselves.

9. Describe the historical development of Deaf Culture.

10. Identify past and present Deaf artists, writers and storytellers who influenced Deaf Culture

and American Sign Language.

11. Compare and contrast the changing image of Deaf people and how the changes have

influenced the art of Deaf people.

12. Identify and differentiate the social and political organizations of Deaf people.

13. Identify and describe the functions of various past and current devices used by Deaf people,

and how these devices have changed over the years.

14. Describe how Deaf cultural values relate to technology and how technology has changed the

Deaf Culture in the United States of America.

V. COURSE CONTENT:

The American Deaf: The phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States and foreign Deaf cultures.

The American Deaf: Distinguishing the various aspects of United States of America

Deaf/Hearing communities and Deaf/Hearing Cultures.

Deaf Values and Behaviors: The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their

Deaf/Hearing parents.

Deaf Values and Behaviors: Some basic values and behaviors of United States of

America Deaf people related to language use.

The American Sign Language: Recognizing, comparing and describing how ASL fits

into a linguistic framework and into the family of human languages.

Deaf Heritage: Summarizing and describing the historical ideas, perspectives and

development of Deaf Culture, and the perspectives held by Hearing and Deaf people.

VII. The Deaf Culture in Art: ASL Literature and Deaf Artists: Some past and present

Deaf artists, and the changing image of Deaf people influencing the art of Deaf Culture and

American Sign Language.

VIII. Organizations of Deaf People: Various organizations of Deaf people.

IX. Technology and Deaf People: How technology affects the Deaf culture and the

Deaf community.

VI. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:

A. Question and Answer Sessions

B. Discussions

C. Homework assignments

D. Videotapes

E. Vlogs

F. PowerPoint Presentations

VII.STUDENT EVALUATION:

The breakdown of each line item for grading purposes are as follows:

The following exams will consist of various questions such as filling in the blanks, matching, multiple choice, paragraph, short answer, T/F, etc.:

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Mid‑Term Exam# 1 ‑ 30% (The American Deaf, and Deaf Values and Behaviors)

Mid-Term Exam #1 begins on March 16, 2011 from 12:01am to March 23, 2011 12:00 midnight (take the exam anytime that week). [from PowerPoint, Lead Questions & assigned pages from three required textbooks (see class schedule on p. 6-9) pertaining to The American Deaf, and Deaf Values and Behaviors].

Mid‑Term Exam #2 ‑ 30% (The American Sign Language)

Mid-Term Exam #2 begins on April 13, 2011 from 12:01am to April 20, 2011 12:00 midnight (take the exam anytime that week). [from PowerPoint, Lead Questions & assigned pages from three required textbooks (see class schedule on p. 9-10) pertaining to The American Sign Language].

C. Individual Written Report ‑ 5% (see Roman numeral VIII Individual Written Report

p. 3 & p. 13-16 of the syllabus).

1. Due on May 16, 2011

D. Final Exam ‑ 35% (Deaf Heritage, The Deaf Culture in Art, Organizations of Deaf People,

and Technology and Deaf People)

Final Exam on May 18, 2011 from 12:01am to May 21, 2011 12:00 midnight (take the exam anytime during these four days). [from PowerPoint, Lead Questions & assigned pages from three required textbooks (see class schedule on p. 10-11) pertaining to Deaf Heritage, The Deaf Culture in Art, Organizations of Deaf People, and Technology and Deaf People].

*Students with disabilities who may need academic accommodations should discuss options

with their professors during the first two weeks of class.

INDIVIDUAL WRITTEN REPORT:

Each student is to select one textbook from pages 14 -16 of the course syllabus or a textbook not listed that focuses on the humanistic aspects of Deaf people (student must request approval from professor). Each student should follow the Written Report guidelines on page 13 of the course syllabus as closely as possible.

*One Individual Written Report due on May 16, 2011.

LEAD QUESTIONS:

These are questions I have developed to prepare you for the Midterm Exams and Final Exam. Answers to Lead Questions will be provided on March 9th, April 6th, and May 11th.

X. REQUIRED TEXTS:

A. Ladd, P. (2003). Understanding Deaf Culture - In Search of Deafhood, Buffalo, NY:

Multilingual Matters LTD; ISBN: 1-85359-545-4

B. Lane, Harlan; Hoffmeister, Robert and Bahan, Ben (1996) A Journey into the Deaf

World, Dawn Sign Press; ISBN: 0‑915035‑63‑4

C. Moore, M. S. & Levitan, L. (2003). For Hearing People Only - 3rd ed.

Rochester, NY: Deaf Life Press; ISBN: 0-9634-016-3-7

XI. RECOMMENDED SUPPLEMENTAL TEXTS:

A. Gannon, J. R. (1981). Deaf Heritage (A Narrative History of Deaf America),

Silver Spring, MD: NAD

Padden, C. & Humphries, T. (2005). Inside Deaf Culture, Cambridge, Mass.:

Harvard University Press

Van Cleve, J. V. (1993) Deaf History Unveiled, Washington, DC:

Gallaudet University Press

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

* Students are responsible to pay all fees and process the ADD code for the course within the established time frame. Students will not be able to continue in the course if the enrollment process is not completed within the given time frame.

* Students are responsible to drop the course as to avoid the potential of having a grade be assigned for the course at the end of the course.

*Students are expected to respect and obey standards of student conduct while in class and on the campus. (Policy 3100 and Procedures 3100.1 and 3100.2) Charges of misconduct and disciplinary sanctions may be imposed upon students who violate these standards of conduct or provisions of college regulations. In addition, instructors expect appropriate classroom participation and conduct. Monopolizing classroom discussions, being uncooperative, talking during lecture, using profanity, reading unrelated material, and using electronic equipment (texting, chirps, ring mode) are examples of behavior that may not be tolerated. Bringing children to class is not allowed. Regarding "talking in class", the student will be warned once, and if the student disregards the warning, s/he will be requested to leave the class for (1) one day resulting in (1) one class absence. The next warning will result the student requested to leave the class and miss (2) two consecutive classes. This inevitably means the student will fall behind in his/her class work.

*Cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty are not acceptable and will not be tolerated in accordance with the college student code of conduct and basic standards of academic honesty. Violations of standards of academic honesty will be reported to the college disciplinary office for appropriate action.

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*If you have to miss a class, it is your responsibility to find out what you missed. There are three questions you should never ask the instructor:

"Did I miss anything?" Of course you did.

"Did we do anything important?" Of course we did.

"Can you tell me what I missed?" No. You are responsible for everything that happens in a class, so you are responsible for gathering whatever information you have missed.

*At the beginning of each of your classes, you should identify a study buddy, someone you can study with on a regular basis or just call in emergencies.

AMSL 104 ‑ INTRODUCTION TO DEAF CULTURE

Class Schedule

Week One - Jan. 24: Introduction and Overview

UDC: Introduction: pp. 1-9, 14-19, 21-25, Ch. 1: pp. 32-39.

Week One - Jan. 26: The American Deaf

The phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States and

foreign Deaf cultures.

Distinguishing the various aspects of United States of America

Deaf/Hearing communities and Deaf/Hearing Cultures.

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing parents.

JD‑W: Ch. 5 pp. 124‑130.

Week Two - Jan. 31: The American Deaf

The phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States and

foreign Deaf cultures.

Distinguishing the various aspects of United States of America

Deaf/Hearing communities and Deaf/Hearing Cultures.

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing parents.

UDC: Ch. 1: pp. 26-32; pp. 39-48.

Week Two - Feb. 2: The American Deaf

The phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States and

foreign Deaf cultures.

Distinguishing the various aspects of United States of America

Deaf/Hearing communities and Deaf/Hearing Cultures.

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing parents.

UDC: Ch. 1: pp. 59-64; pp. 72-73.

Week Three - Feb. 7: The American Deaf

The phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States and

foreign Deaf cultures.

Distinguishing the various aspects of United States of America

Deaf/Hearing communities and Deaf/Hearing Cultures.

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing parents.

UDC: Ch. 5: pp. 232-266.

Week Three - Feb. 9: The American Deaf

The phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States and

foreign Deaf cultures.

Distinguishing the various aspects of United States of America

Deaf/Hearing communities and Deaf/Hearing Cultures.

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

FHPO: Ch. 10, 37,38, 39 & 40.

Week Four - Feb. 14: The American Deaf

The phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States and

foreign Deaf cultures.

Distinguishing the various aspects of United States of America

Deaf/Hearing communities and Deaf/Hearing Cultures.

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

FHPO: Ch. 51, 52, 53, 55 & 56.

Week Four - Feb. 16: The American Deaf

The phenomena of culture among Deaf people in the United States and

foreign Deaf cultures.

Distinguishing the various aspects of United States of America

Deaf/Hearing communities and Deaf/Hearing Cultures.

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

FHPO: Ch. 57, 58, 59, 60 & 77.

*Week Five - Feb. 21: Washington's Birthday

Week Five - Feb. 23: Deaf Values and Behaviors

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

Some basic values and behaviors of United States of America Deaf people

related to language use.

JD‑W: Ch. 1 pp. 3‑23; Ch. 2 pp. 24‑41.

FHPO: Ch. 21, 22, 23, 24, 44, 85, 90, 95.

Week Six - Feb. 28: Deaf Values and Behaviors

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

Some basic values and behaviors of United States of America Deaf people

related to language use.

JD‑W: Ch. 3 pp. 67‑77; Ch. 7 pp. 213‑227.

FHPO: Ch. 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110 & 111.

Week Six - March 2: Deaf Values and Behaviors

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

Some basic values and behaviors of United States of America Deaf people

related to language use.

JD‑W: Ch. 13 pp. 369‑378.

FHPO: Ch. 112, 113, 114, 115, 116.

Week Seven - March 7: Deaf Values and Behaviors

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

Some basic values and behaviors of United States of America Deaf people

related to language use.

JD‑W: Ch. 15 pp. 408‑425.

FHPO: Ch. 117, 118, 119, 120, 121.

Week Seven - March 9: Deaf Values and Behaviors

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

Some basic values and behaviors of United States of America Deaf people

related to language use.

JD‑W: Ch. 15 pp. 437‑451.

*Answers to Lead Questions provided.

Week Eight - March 14: Deaf Values and Behaviors

The relationships between Deaf/Hearing children and their Deaf/Hearing

parents.

Some basic values and behaviors of United States of America Deaf people

related to language use.

FHPO: Ch. 122, 123, 128, 130 & 131.

Week Eight - March 16 to March 23: Mid‑Term Exam #1

Week Nine - March 21: The American Sign Language

Recognizing, comparing and describing how ASL fits into a linguistic

framework and into the family of human languages.

JD‑W: Ch. 3 pp. 42‑51.

Week Nine - March 23: The American Sign Language

Recognizing, comparing and describing how ASL fits into a linguistic

framework and into the family of human languages.

JD‑W: Ch. 3 pp. 63‑66.

Week Ten - March 28: The American Sign Language

Recognizing, comparing and describing how ASL fits into a linguistic

framework and into the family of human languages.

JD‑W: Ch. 4 pp. 78‑123.

Week Ten - March 30: The American Sign Language

Recognizing, comparing and describing how ASL fits into a linguistic

framework and into the family of human languages.

FHPO: Ch. 3 & 6.

Week Eleven - April 4: The American Sign Language

Recognizing, comparing and describing how ASL fits into a linguistic

framework and into the family of human languages.

FHPO: Ch. 7 & 11.

Week Eleven - April 6: The American Sign Language

Recognizing, comparing and describing how ASL fits into a linguistic

framework and into the family of human languages.

FHPO: Ch. 17 & 18.

*Answers to Lead Questions provided.

Week Twelve - April 11 ‑ The American Sign Language

Recognizing, comparing and describing how ASL fits into a linguistic

framework and into the family of human languages.

FHPO: Ch. 19 & 67.

Week Twelve - April 13 to April 20: Mid‑Term Exam #2

Week Thirteen - April 18: Spring Recess: No classes held

Week Thirteen - April 20: Spring Recess: No classes held

Week Fourteen - April 25: Deaf Heritage

Summarizing and describing the historical ideas, perspectives and development of Deaf Culture, and the perspectives held by Hearing and Deaf people.

JD‑W: Ch. 3 pp. 51‑63; Ch. 14 pp. 379‑386.

UDC: Ch. 2: pp. 90-133; Ch. 3: pp. 135-161.

Week Fourteen - April 27: Deaf Heritage

Summarizing and describing the historical ideas, perspectives and development of Deaf Culture, and the perspectives held by Hearing and Deaf people.

UDC: Ch. 7: pp. 297-329; Ch. 8: pp. 332-366.

FHPO: Ch. 1, 4, 8, 13, 28, 29, 78, 99, 100, 101, 102 & 129.

Week Fifteen - May 2: The Deaf Culture in Art: ASL Literature and Deaf Artist

Some past and present Deaf artists, and the changing image of Deaf people

influencing the art of Deaf Culture and American Sign Language.

JD‑W: Ch. 5 pp. 138‑158.

Week Fifteen - May 4: The Deaf Culture in Art: ASL Literature and Deaf Artist

Some past and present Deaf artists, and the changing image of Deaf people

influencing the art of Deaf Culture and American Sign Language.

UDC: Ch. 1: pp. 48-56.

Week Sixteen - May 9: The Deaf Culture in Art: ASL Literature and Deaf Artist

Some past and present Deaf artists, and the changing image of Deaf people

influencing the art of Deaf Culture and American Sign Language.

FHPO: Ch. 9, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66 & 68.

Week Sixteen - May 11: Organizations of Deaf People, & Technology and Deaf People

Various organizations of Deaf people & How technology affects the Deaf

culture and the Deaf community.

JD‑W: Ch. 5 pp. 131‑138; pp. 138‑158.

UDC: Ch. 1: pp. 64-72.

*Answers to Lead Questions provided.

Week Seventeen - May 16: Organizations of Deaf People, & Technology and Deaf People

Various organizations of Deaf people & How technology affects the Deaf

culture and the Deaf community.

JD‑W: Ch. 15 pp. 431‑437.

FHPO: Ch. 75, 76, 103 & 125.

*Individual Written Reports Due.

Week Seventeen - May 18 to 21: Final Exam

*Professor reserves the right to modify the instruction schedule

Important Dates:

February 4 ‑ Last day to receive and process an add code issued by the instructor. Last day to process and pay for add codes. Deadline to drop classes with no "W" recorded.

February 7 ‑ Last day to drop and be eligible for refund of enrollment fees and/or

non‑resident tuition.

 April 1 ‑ Withdrawal deadline ‑ No drops accepted after this date.

 It is the student's responsibility to drop all classes in which he/she is no longer participating. 

 It is the instructor's discretion to withdraw a student after the add/drop deadline

February 7th due to excessive absences.

 Students who remain enrolled in a class beyond the published withdrawal deadline,

as stated in the class schedule, will receive an evaluative letter grade in this class.

WRITTEN REPORT

This report should be about 5 typewritten pages. Papers may be handed in early, but NO late papers will be accepted. The papers should be typed in DS (double spaced) with size 12 font.

The first paragraph should briefly summarize the story idea as you understand it.

The second paragraph should describe how you felt as you read the story. Did you experience any changes of feelings as you read along? What were they?

Third, answer the question, "Do you think this could have really happened?" Explain your answer. This question may or may not apply to your story.

Fourth, describe the major characters. What kind of people were they?

Fifth, select one incident from the story that seemed especially important to you and why you chose that particular incident.

REFERENCE MATERIALS LIST

(ASL or DEAF CULTURE Classes)

DEAF CULTURE

Bowe, Frank (1986) Changing the Rules, T. J. Publishers, Inc.

Breindel, Tina Jo (1999) Quotes from Deaf Women for a Positive Life. Dawn Sign Press

Cohen, Leah Hager (1994) Train Go Sorry: Inside a Deaf World, Random House

Drolsbaugh, Mark (1997) Deaf Ate, Handwave Publications

Eastman, Gil (2000) Just a DEAF Person's Thoughts II. Linstok Press

Erting, Carol (1994) Deafness. Communication.. Social Identity. Sign Media, Inc.

Erting, Carol J.& Johnson, Robert C. & Smith, Dorothy L. & Snider, Bruce N. (1994) Deaf Way: The International Celebration of the Language. Culture. History, and Arts of Deaf People Gallaudet University Press

Farb, Anita B. (1998) Unrealized Visions: What's Next for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Community?. NAD

Garretson, Mervin D. (1994) Life & Culture. Harris Publishing Co.

Garretson, Mervin D. (1995) Life & Culture II. Harris Publishing Co.

Garretson, Mervin D. (1996) Historical Perspectives, Harris Publishing Co.

Glickman, Ken (1999) A Proverbial Professor's Points to Ponder. Harris Publishing Co.

Hairston, Ernest & Smith, Linwood (1983) Black and Deaf in America. T.J. Publishers, Inc.

Holcomb, Roy & Holcomb, Samuel & Holcomb, Thomas (1995) Deaf Culture. Our Way. Dawn Sign Press

Jacobs, Leo M. (1989) A Deaf Adult Speaks Out, Gallaudet University Press

Jepson, Jill (1992) No Walls of Stone: An Anthology of Literature bar Deaf and Hard of Healing Writers. Gallaudet University Press

Kannapell, Barbara (1993) Language Choice ‑ Identity Choice. Linstok Press

Lane, Harlan (1992) The Mask of Benevolence. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.

Maher, Jane (1996) Seeing Language in Sign: The Work of William C. Stokoe, Gallaudet University Press

Moore, Matthew Scott & Panara, Robert F. (1996) Great Deaf Americans: The Second Edition, Deaf Life Press

Padden, Carol and Humphries, Tom (1988) Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture, Harvard University Press

Paris, Damara Goff & Drolsbaugh, Mark (1999) Deaf Esprit: Inspiration. Humor and Wisdom from the Deaf Community, AGO Gifts and Publications

Podmore, Ron (1995) Sins in Success: Profiles of Deaf Americans, Harris Publishing Co.

Rutherford, Susan (1993) A Study of American Deaf Folklore. Linstok Press

Sacks, Oliver (1989) _See~' g Voices: A Journey into the World of the Deaf, Harper Collins

Schaller, Bob (1999) The Kenny Walker Story, Harris Publishing Co.

Schein, Jerome D. (1989) At Home Among Strangers, Gallaudet University Press

Stokoe, William (1980) Sign and Culture: A Reader for Students of ASL, Linstok Press

Toole, Darlene (1996) Living Legends: Six Stories About Successful Deaf People. Butte Publications, Inc.

Toole, Darlene (1998) Living Legends II: Six Stories About Successful Deaf People , Butte Publications, Inc.

Winefield, Richard (1987) Never the Twain Shall Meet: The Communications Debate. Gallaudet University Press

Woodward, James (1982) How You Gonna Get to Heaven If You Can't Talk With Jesus: On Depathologizing Deafness. T.J. Publishers

Wright, Mary Herring (1999) Sounds Like Home: Growing Up Black and Deaf in the South, Gallaudet University Press

DEAF HISTORY

Albronda, Mildred (1994) Douglas Tilden: The Man and His Legacy, Mildred Albronda, Publisher

Boynton, Douglas C. (1998) Forbidden Signs: American Culture and the Campaign Against Sign Language. 1847‑1920, University of Chicago Press

Carroll, Cathryn & Mather, Susan M.(1997) Movers & Shakers: Deaf People Who Changed the World. Dawn Sign Press

Gannon, Jack R. (1981) Deaf Heritage: A Narrative History of Deaf America NAD

Groce, Nora Ellen (1985) Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language,, Harvard University Press

Jankowski, Katherine A. (1997) Deaf Empowerment: Emergence. Struggle. & Rhetoric Gallaudet University Press

Lane, Harlan (1984) When the Mind Hears. Random House, Inc.

Van Cleve, John (1993) Deaf History Unveiled: Interpretations from the New Scholarship, Gallaudet University Press

Van Cleve, John and Crouch, Barry (1989) A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America. Gallaudet University Press

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

Battison, Robbin (1978) Lexical Borrowing In American Sign Language. Linstok Press

Stokoe, William (1993) Sign Language Structure. Linstok Press

Valli, Clayton & Lucas, Ceil (1979) ASL PAH! ! Deaf Student's Essays About Their Language. Sign Media, Inc.

Wilcox, Sherman (1992) Academic Acceptance of American Sign Language Sign Media, Inc.

Woodward, James (1994) Describing Variation in American Sign Language, Linstok Press