History Of Work Integrated Learning

Published:

This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

While reviewing the literature on the subject of the impact of the Hospitality Curriculum at the Durban University of Technology on Work Integrated Learning. The researcher believes that one needs to deal with the issues separately, that is the issue of Work Integrated Learning firstly and then the issue of the Curriculum at the Durban University of Technology .The chapter reviews literature that is based on the above mentioned issues and it has been divided into different sections. The sections start to talk about Work Integrated Learning in general explaining what it is about and then goes on to talk about the history of Work Integrated Learning and how it was founded. The next idea deals with the importance of Work Integrated Learning, it is then followed by the Work Integrated Learning process and the next section talks about the benefits of Work Integrated Learning. The next area starts talking about the Hospitality Management curriculum at the Durban University of Technology and it goes into the next section which discusses the Work Integrated Learning process used at the Durban University of Technology. The trainees experience Work Integrated Learning is dealt with here and then it show the ideal Work Integrated Learning experience for a in service trainee. The next sections talks about Hospitality and leads on to the next section which gives an overview of the Hospitality Industry. The last section discusses the Hospitality Management Programs at different universities and institutions.

2.2.1 Work Integrated Learning (Cooperative education)

According to Poppins and Singh (2005) Work Integrated Learning is referred to as an internship program by many people and it provides the learner with real life learning experiences. Work Integrated Learning is included in many academic programs and universities not only in South Africa ,but all over the world. There are many names that Work Integrated Learning is referred to and some of the names are internships, sandwich year, workplace learning and cooperative education. Work Integrated Learning can be defined when a student that is doing a tertiary degree program has a period in time where they undergo professional work in their field of study. It is said that by providing students with real life experiences it is one of the best methods to prepare the students for their future career. Similarly, Schuetze and Sweet(2003) state that there are debates whether the universities and colleges teach graduates the knowledge and skills relevant to work in a knowledge based economy. There are high demands on universities to provide and supply both highly trained workers. To meet their objectives universities have developed alternative strategies to prepare young people for work life and one of these strategies used is Cooperative Education which is also known as Work Integrated Learning.

(Suskie, 2009:124) suggests that when students start Work Integrated Learning it is very important that they develop their goals and information should be collected by students on their goals from internal and external resources. The internal resources can be a college or universities, mission statement, vision statement and the experiences of recent graduates can be internal resources also. External resources can be goals of the industry, surveys or interviews of current employees. Nipson(2000) states that Work Integrated Learning has introduced the adult world of work to students and it has been described as a learning plan where students earn and with this the students can graduate with the knowledge and experience to be successful in their careers that await them. There are certain environments that support Work Integrated Learning and each of these environments should support a learner or a teacher and also provide support for interactions between the two for learning purposes. According to Wynn(2000) employers can reap many rewards from Work Integrated Learning as it is a less expensive means of recruiting and looking for future employees. It also reduces the cost of keeping existing employees and employers can evaluate the students without making a long term commitment to them.

2.2.2History of Work Integrated Learning

According to Schuetze and Sweet(2003) the idea of cooperative education began to take place in the summer of 1894.The story is told about Herman Schneider who was a engineering graduate and he was building bridges in this time, While working on these bridges he discovered two things about the students that were working on this project with him. The first concern that he observed was that the students part time work was not in relation to their area of study or future career. The Secondly concern was that the students also experienced difficulty in adapting their classroom skills to the work in the field. This showed him that certain elements of the engineering process could not be covered in the class room. He began teaching and tested his observations by conducting interviews with current engineers and also their employers. He came up with a programme that included an apprenticeship and a school work. The benefits were that the trainees were able to work in their field, thus learning practical engineering skills that cant be taught in the classroom. The other benefit was that the students were allowed to earn money and gain experience at the same time.

Linn, Howard and Miller(2004) state that cooperative education was developed nearly 100 years ago, it was not really known until the 1960s.In this time funds were set out for institutes and universities and the money was used to start the cooperative education programs. Cooperative programs attract the attention of colleges and universities as they want to include it in their learning streams. The reason for this interest is so that the institutes and universities can prepare students for the change from the college to the workplace with an opportunity to explore the world beyond the classroom.

2.2.3The importance of Work Integrated Learning

Nipson (2000) feels that students that go through cooperative education start off knowing more about their jobs as they have that practical experience and they have an advantage over the students that didn't undergo Work Integrated Learning. Other benefits is that students enjoy their work and tend to stay in their chosen field longer then students that have not experienced cooperative education. He feels that there are no students that will not benefit from cooperative education as it gives the student a learning opportunity at a low cost and the student also has the opportunity to earn money as well as learn at the same time. In a study conducted by Business Higher Education forum(1997) business leaders all agreed that graduates that did not undergo in service training lacked communication skills, the ability to work in teams, flexibility and the ability to work with people .Rich(1967) says that there are more educational systems needed like Work Integrated Learning to create trained people that will help form a built-up society. Howard(2004) noted that students are now realising that the traditional college setting of classrooms may not prepare them well enough for the competitive work environment. Employers further feel that the academic programmes at universities and institutes do not prepare students successfully with the essential skills to be competent in the workplace. So the need for in - service training is essential so that the students can develop the skills and abilities for the industry.

Grosjean(2004) states that the social setting for Work Integrated Learning can be the classroom or the work place and students feel that workplace learning is more important than classroom learning. Classroom learning does not take on a meaning for students, until there is practical application for them. Cooperative education students state that when they enter the workplace they have little or no specific knowledge and they slowly become experts in their field of work. Cooperative Education creates closer connections between school and work for the students. Cooperative education brings together classroom studies with paid and supervised work experiences. It is said that students that go through co op programs earn more money than students that don't. It is very good for students because they get valuable experience that can be put on their resumes.

2.2.4Work Integrated Learning(Cooperative Education) process

The Black Enterprise (2000) states that cooperative education programs are a form of work study, except that the work is not on campus . A lot of students are groomed by firms and hired by the same firms after that have completed their studies. Salaries for the students range from a minimum wage to the pay equal to a normal workers wage who performs the same duties. The hours worked by the student are discussed between the academic supervisor and the employer. The Black Enterprise(2000) also mentions that students must apply to places that is going to offer them a solid work experience and also help them develop skills, they must apply to places that is going to help them grow in their fields. Many employers require students to submit resumes and come in for interviews so they can be screened beforehand and selected. The student placements often depends on the student's academic performance, past work, volunteer experience as well as their career goals.

Poppins and Singh(2005) state that universities have to appoint a coordinator for Work Integrated Learning and also an academic person to manage the process of placing and assessing the students in the industry. The students are required to register for Work Integrated Learning and they must indicate where they would like to work, it is from here that the coordinator will work towards placing the students in their desired work areas. The students attend lectures on Work Integrated Learning before they go into their workplace. This is a preparation for Work Integrated Learning and it teaches the students on the role of Work Integrated Learning and how it works, resume writing, interview techniques, ethics in the workplace and also guidelines about their Work Integrated Learning experience that they are going to undergo.

2.2.5Benefits of Work Integrated Learning

According to Coll and Eames (2000) there are many benefits that are identified for students, the host organization, and the academic institution where the student is from when it comes to Work integrated Learning. The benefits for students are career enhancement, financial rewards, cost savings, and interaction between the employers and the academic institution.

Nipson(1972) states that when cooperative education students graduate they have a head start on their peers who have not gone through such a programme. It provides a direction and dedication that students cannot find at school. Ashton and Sung(2004) mention that workplace learning is fairly new and has become an important part of the skills formation of a student.

Research that Grosjean (2004) conducted shows that co operative education graduate students are likely to get jobs according to their academic background and they have more practical knowledge of their studies then students that did not undergo cooperative education. It is said that these students develop a better understanding of how and why the world operates as it does. He further states that cooperative students get better jobs, get the jobs faster, make more money and are more productive citizens than students that did not undergo cooperative education. There are certain resources that are available at the workplace that will allow students to complete their tasks with success. The learning flow in the classroom is made to look insufficient as the workplace learning gives students a better understanding of the academic coursework. Students learn a lot more on the job as they can see how it ties up to what they are learning. Students feel they learn a lot more in the workplace and they come back with skills that they would not have acquired if they didn't go for Cooperative Education.

Eames(2000) states that the success of cooperative education can be that the students get more knowledge about their career direction and also more confidence in their ability to work. If the students are successful with their placements they can get asked to stay on with their companies. Coll and Eames (2000) listed the benefits of cooperative education to be financial rewards, career enhancement, cost savings, and good relationships between the employers and the academic institution. Students that Participate in cooperative education programs are able to know their career goals, complete their studies easily, they are better academically and they have a lot self confidence and knowledge of careers and workplace requirements and earn higher salaries. These students tend to have better job seeking skills such as resume writing and interview skills. There are four key themes of benefits to students in Co operative Education, these are personal growth and maturity, work skills, academic impact, and employability. Bell(2005) summarized four career skills that employers, recruiters and career development staff have identified that could be obtained through co-operative education. These career skills are communication skills, academic skills, leadership skills and job acquisition skills. One area in which Co operative Education contributes to the academic institution is in the development of the students attributes and skills.

Poppins and Singh(2005) come to the conclusion that Work Integrated Learning in education is a valuable and important part of the curriculum providing students with real life learning before they enter the work place. The hotel school website(2009) states that there are many hotels that take in service trainees, as this helps them in their departments and also gives the students valuable experience. They also state that there is a remuneration for the hotel trainees doing their training at the various hotels. They say that trainees are placed in four and five star hotels and gain the necessary experience to make them grow in the Hospitality Industry,Linn, Howard and Miller(2004) say that a lot of students have discovered that the traditional classroom does not prepare them well to be successful workers in a competitive new environment. They also state the cooperative education is an excellent educational model to introduce students to and prepare them for the workplace. It has been determined that most students want to work while studying, it is a way of students satisfying their financial needs and studying at the same time. Inman(2000) states that Work integrated Learning provides students with access to real-world experiences and allows for the application of theory to practice. Work integrated Learning has been found to improve students confidence, knowledge within their profession.

2.3.1Cirruculum at the Durban University of Technology Hospitality Management

According to Jaszay and Dunk(2003) there are various methods of teaching that is used universities and these methods of teaching include demonstration, simulation, role plays, lectures, self instructed manuals, classroom activities, prepared training manuals. Ori(2008) states that Work-based learning has to be curriculum-driven; structured and outcomes-based; monitored, assessed and quality assured and students must understand what they are learning. Ori(2008) states that it is compulsory for every programme at Durban University of Technology to have an Advisory Board, at least sixty per cent of the members of the Advisory Board has to be external to the university. The duties of the Advisory Board is to give input into the relevance of curricula, as well as the delivery of curricula both in the workplace and at the university.

The Durban University of Technology(2010) website suggests that good hospitality management is where businesses which provide hospitality as their main product show high standards. The main areas are accommodation, food and beverage production and service, conferences. Establishments may have their differences and they all have a common commitment to service excellence. In careers where service is very important, it is the challenge of every general manager and their team to ensure that each guest leaves the hotel satisfied.

According to the Durban University of Technology website a student would be doing the following subjects if they were studying towards the diploma in Hospitality Management. In the first year the student would do nines subjects and the subjects would include:

SUBJECT

ASSESSMENT

Culinary studies and nutrition

Annual - Examinable

Food and Beverage Studies

Annual - Examinable

Hospitality Communication

Continuous Evaluation

Hospitality Financial Management

Annual - Examinable

Hospitality Management

Annual - Examinable

Hospitality health and safety

Annual - Examinable

Hospitality Information systems

Continuous Evaluation

Accommodation Management

Annual - Examinable

Service Excellence

Annual - Examinable

Source : DUT website

Year 2

Culinary studies and nutrition

Semester - Examinable

Food and Beverage Studies

Semester - Examinable

Hospitality Communication

Continuous Evaluation

Hospitality Financial Management

Semester - Examinable

Hospitality Management

Semester - Examinable

Hospitality Information systems

Continuous Evaluation

Hospitality Industry Law

Semester - Examinable

Accommodation Management

Semester - Examinable

Food and Beverage Management

Semester - Examinable

Source : DUT website

This would be the period where the student would be going into Work Integrated Learning into the various Hospitality areas. The student would be placed at in service for a year and six months would be within Durban and the remaining six would be out of Durban. Some students do their in service training overseas and this would include doing their full year of in service in that one area.

Hospitality Management III

Semester - Examinable

Financial Management III

Semester - Examinable

Hospitality Event Management I

Continuous Evaluation

Hospitality Law II

Semester - Examinable

Hospitality Information Systems

Continuous Evaluation

Food and Beverage Operations

Semester - Examinable

Accommodation Management

Semester - Examinable

Professional Cookery

Semester - Examinable

This would conclude all of the subjects that a student would be exposed to in the curriculum while studying for a Diploma in Hospitality Management.

2.3.2Durban University of Technology Hospitality Management Work-Integrated Learning Process

According to Ori (2008) on the discussion of Work-Integrated Learning, he begins by saying that learning over here occurs in the workplace and that Work-Integrated Learning is also key in addressing the skills shortage in this country . The concept of 'learning by doing' is not new and it is now practised in all universities. This partnership is ongoing with Work Integrated Learning and it is not restricted to a one time placement of student in the work place. He further states that at the Durban University of Technology, staff exchange between the university and industry is important to achieve a satisfactory Work-Integrated Learning experience. The Durban University of Technology ensures that the workplace is approved before the student is placed and this is done by suitably qualified and experienced academic staff. Ori(2008) says that once the students are in the workplace they are regularly monitored by academic staff who make scheduled visits to the workplace and here they can view the performance of the students. There are many ways of evaluating the students, it can be portfolios, programme-based assessments and evaluations are some of the assessment tools used. After they have completed Work-Integrated Learning, the students are debriefed and this is an important feedback and allows students to reflect on their placement, especially with the experiences of other students. All Work-Integrated Learning students of Durban University of Technology are registered with the university during their Work-Integrated Learning and during their Work-Integrated Learning placement period the students are the students of the Durban University of Technology and not employees of the company with which they are placed. Over the years, it has been seen that students are often not placed because they were not ready for work.

According to the WIL handbook, many of the programmes offered at the Durban University of Technology have Work Integrated Learning as a compulsory part of their course. This is the formal and supervised exposure of the industry to the student where they can get hands on experience. Work Integrated Learning covers the main areas with regards to a Hotel. The supervisory tutor contacts the relevant subject heads and he gets information about the students with regards to attendance of lectures, contribution in class, helpfulness and personal presentation of the student. Now the supervisory tutor will draw up a profile on each student and interviews will be conducted with the students. All of this will help the supervisory tutor decide where the student will be placed for their Work Integrated Learning experience.Durban University of Technology website(2010) states that in the Hospitality Management courses offered here, their students spend a year doing their in service training. All students are required to go for in service training at the Department of Hospitality and Tourism at the Durban University of Technology. Six months of that year is done out of the Kwa Zulu Natal region and the other six months can be done it the Kwa Zulu Natal region. The Work Integrated Learning makes up a large part of the course mark for the students.The benefits of Work-Integrated Learning at the Durban University of Technology according to Ori(2008) are improved academic results due to them being connected with theory and practice, students get permanent jobs more quickly, they are more enthusiastic, motivated students that add to the work place, employers save on recruitment costs as they can keep the students on after their inservice.

While the student is at Work Integrated Learning they would cover the following areas according to the Durban University of Technology Hospitality and Tourism Department.

Accommodation management stream students

Front office - (reception, reservations, switch board ,concierge ,guest relations and night audit) - 3 months

Housekeeping (guest room cleaning, laundry, managing inventories) - 1 month

Accounts (General Ledger, debtors, creditors, banking, front office recon) - 1 month

Maintenance department - 2 weeks

Management (duty management and special projects) - 2 weeks

Food and beverage stream students

Restaurant(breakfast, lunch, dinner, cashiering, set up, waitron ) - 2 1/2 months

Kitchen(breakfast ,lunch ,dinner ,hot and cold kitchen, ,menu design, planning and costing) - 1 Month

Stores/Purchasing(costing, stock controls, receiving, issues, data capturing) - 1 month

Banqueting/events (reservations, set up, costing, AV and equipment, complaints and follow up) - 2 weeks

Management(duty management and special projects) - 2 weeks

Professional cookery stream students

Restaurant(breakfast, lunch, dinner, cashiering, set up, waitron ) - 3 months

Kitchen(breakfast ,lunch ,dinner ,hot and cold kitchen, ,menu design, planning and costing) - 1 month

Stores/Purchasing(costing, stock controls, receiving, issues, data capturing) - 1 month

Banqueting/events (reservations, set up, costing, AV and equipment, complaints and follow up) - 2 weeks

Management(duty management and special projects) - 2 weeks

2.3.3Trainees experience of Work Integrated Learning

Coll, Eames & Halsey (1997) suggest that an important part of the success of any program is the continued support of employers. This is most likely to occur if the employers have a successful placement experience every time they employ a student. A positive placement experience will increase the chance of the employer taking on another student in the future and one of the most effective methods of ensuring a good placement experience is to achieve the good match of student with employer.

Tanke(2001) suggests that the training that in service trainees undergo can take place in many ways in the hospitality industry. Some of these methods used can be formal and others can be informal and many methods are used to develop the trainees skills and it all depends on their training objectives. He further suggests that there are certain methods that are effective in training, the lecture method is a method that is very cost effective when training students, here audio and video materials can be used to aid in the lectures to trainees and the training manager in your hotel would conduct this. Tanke(2001) also says that on the job training is also another effective method used to train in service trainees and here the trainee is actually performing tasks required in their scope of work. There are also some bad habits that on the job training can show to trainees as these bad habits can be passed along to trainees and can interfere with your objective of guest satisfaction and a loss in productivity. However a good well designed on the job training can overcome these problems effectively and easily. Tanke(2001) illustrates another form of training called job instruction training, this is where the trainee understands the reason behind doing a task and they end up performing the role without fail and having a better understanding of it. Holt, Mackay and Smith(2003) state that students gain significant value from their in service placements. Students identified in service training as the most valuable aspect of their course as it provided the opportunity to gain first hand experience of the workforce as well as hands on experience of working on real projects.

According to Bonnet.(2009) the work‐integrated learning registered trainee will conduct the specified training in industry and will complete an academic portfolio in which reports are completed in terms of the competencies learnt. The training standards in industry is created through a agreement to focus on the trainees and their training in industry through the academia as the qualification. Trainee confidence in the higher learning is helped by ; learning, teamwork and co‐operation and responsibility. According to Inman (2000) when a student enters the workplace, they move away from a structured university setting to the workplace that is different and unpredictable. This change is a shock for the student, where they may have feelings of loneliness and isolation that comes with being in a new environment and performing new duties.

2.3.4Ideal Work Integrated experience for a in service trainee

According to Jaszay and Dunk(2003) trainees prefer to work in a informal atmosphere where they are treated as professionals rather than students. Their employer must give positive feedback and encouragement regarding their progress. Trainees should not be forced to compete with each other and they work at different speeds and need individual attention. Trainees must be told what to do and the steps to do it by their employers and they need to be given real examples when things are explained to them. They should learn to do the activity first and then concentrate on building up speed in doing it. The person showing the trainee the work must have a good knowledge of the work and the training should be made interesting and relevant. There must be a positive environment created for the trainee and the person teaching the trainee must be enthusiastic at all times. All of these methods mentioned above will lead to a positive environment created for the trainee.

Mclay and Skeltin(2007)state that the benefits of introducing an internship may vary according to the students. Most students describe their internship as a great experience that had a major impact on their learning and on their understanding of the real world. Younger tertiary students can benefit from the disciplines of dressing appropriately, start times and duration of work, and the personal communications disciplines of a real work environment. Internships are now providing students with a real alternative and allows the student to explore new and area with the support of an industry based mentor.

2.3.5Hospitality

Webb(2008) states that the history of hospitality goes along way back into history when people built and maintained relationships with others, hospitality was central. It has been described as a behaviour that has to be learned over time. There are many areas where hospitality can take place, it can take place in the home. If someone comes to visit and stay at your home, you would be hospitable to them by providing them with a place to sleep, food, drink and even entertainment. You also get hospitality out of the home and this could simply mean just being nice to a person, being nice and friendly towards them. Hospitality can be viewed in five perspectives, as a product, a process, a policy and attitude and also viewed as a skill. The hospitality industries main product is hospitality and it will the whole process of a guests stay at a hotel for example. This would be from the time that the guest would check in the hotel until they check out and it would also include all of the facilities of the hotel that the guests uses that would contribute to a positive hospitality experience for the guest. It is the relationship between a guest and a host that is entertaining guests.

2.3.6Brief overview about the Hospitality Industry

Webb(2008) states that the Hospitality Industry is said to have origins in Europe and it was something that came with the industrial revolution. Brotherton(2003) states that the hospitality industries main sectors are hotels, restaurants and contract foodservice areas. Different cultures and different groups view hospitality in different ways and the hospitality industry is a service industry. A restaurant is defined as a place where a person can obtain a refreshment and a meal. Dining out at restaurants is something that is increasing all the time. Hospitality can also mean providing care to whoever is in need.

Clayton, Barrows and Bosselman(1999) state that the Hospitality Industry is very unique and it includes many different areas. What is common in the Hospitality industry is that a service is provided and that generates the revenue for the industry. In this industry and service is produced for guests, it cannot be seen making it intangible. In this industry there is a lot of interacting with people and unlike other industries machines and technology cannot take over that part. Success in the Hospitality Industry requires a lot of commitment . There are many opportunities for the Hospitality graduates, they can get into the lodging side and this would include the front office and rooms in a hotel. The other main area is the Food and Beverage side and this would include the restaurants, bars and also banqueting and functions.

According to the Vault career bible(2006) it is not easy working in the Hospitality Industry, guests can be rude and employees work long hours and sometimes seven days a week. People that work in the hospitality industry must always put their needs of their guests first and everyone in a hotel works together as a team. In this industry the staff often work late and are required to work a lot of overtime as a lot of the services are 24 hours in hotels. Details are of the upmost importance in the hospitality industry. Internships and previous experience are an advantage for people that are applying for management positions in the Hospitality Industry. Graduates with hospitality diplomas usually start off as trainee assistant managers or advance to that level very quickly. A lot of the jobs in the industry are service orientated accordin. Hotel staff are encouraged to move around several times in their careers. The website wikepedia describes hospitality as a service industry that includes restaurants, lodging, event planning, theme parks, cruise liners.

According to Clayton, Barrows and Bosselman(1999) they state that the field of Hospitality education is rather unique academic area. An early definition of hospitality included any and all businesses and services whose primary objective is serving people outside of the home. Students of the industry are able to find the appropriate means of professional preparation once they have determined their career objectives and there is also on the job training. The opportunities for graduates are significant in the hospitality industry. these are some of the areas a graduate can get into. These areas are lodging, private clubs, gaming, meetings and events, theme parks, resorts and restaurants according to Clayton, Barrows and Bosselman(1999).

2.3.7Hospitality Management Programs at universities and colleges

Clayton, Barrows and Bosselman(1999) state that the field of Hospitality Education is a very unique academic area and the main aim of Hospitality programs are to prepare students to work in the Hospitality field. There are many courses offered in Hospitality Management, it can be diplomas, degrees and also one year and two year programs are also offered. A qualification has become a requirement for many entry level management positions in the Hospitality Industry.

Wikipedia(2009) states that Hospitality Management is the academic study of the Hospitality industry. It is offered at universities that have a department of Hospitality within it. Other names of this course can be hotel management or hotel and tourism management. This course teaches students how to manage hospitality operations like hotels, restaurants, amusement parks and convention centres. Grosjean(2004) defines learning as being in the classroom which will include the cirruculum, teachers, students, equipment, furnishings and the educators attitude towards education. The workplace context is more professional and formal and it includes the norms and values of the professions, equipment and machinery used for production and a understanding for how things are done in a work place. Eames(2004) states that with a large number of classes and limited number of equipment in universities this means that students do not have much of a chance to do practical research .So the students come out of college with a academic knowledge of their field and no actual experience. In universities learning is structured where you are been thought the theory in lectures and in labs controlled skills are taught. Eames(2004) describes cooperative education as a real world context which you would never get in a university. He also believe that the universities cannot teach students about the real world like the workplace can.

Wit(2010) states that their mission is to provide tomorrows hospitality industry leaders with the practical training, education and cultural the awareness of culture. The management techniques taught at this school are viewed as the best in the world by many people according to their website. This unique, hospitality education and practical training is the only one of its kind in the world at the private hotel school. The International Hotel Schools(2010) mission is to provide hundred percent placements for their successful graduates. Their qualifications are well recognised throughout the world and their trainees are well respected.

Gallagher(2010) states that at the Academy of Hotel Management they are a private academy that offers quality education to their students. This academy only enrols a selected number of students, so that their students can be given individual attention .The lecturers here are actively involved in the industry and they provide interesting lectures for the students. A two year Hospitality Management Diploma is offered at this academy.Lill(2010) states that the University of Johannesburg is recognised as a trusted provider of education in the Tourism and Hospitality industry. It is one of the largest Universities on the African continent and their graduates are known for their hands on skill. Their aim is to develop a new generation of Tourism and Hospitality Management leaders. They state that the Hospitality is one of the industries with high growth in South Africa.

2.4Conclusion

In conclusion the author is appreciative of the opportunity to look at previous research relating to the impact of the Hospitality Curriculum at the Durban University of Technology on Work Integrated Learning and the Hospitality Industry. The study reviewed relevant literature on Work Integrated Learning, information about it and the process used at the Durban University of Technology and it also looks at the satisfaction of trainees and the Hospitality Industry.

Work Integrated Learning has become a important part of a student's studies giving them the opportunity to do practical work and gain valuable experience also. The researcher has explained the Work Integrated Process using others past research to illustrate the whole process. It was very interesting for the researcher to read others research and a lot was learnt by the researcher.

Writing Services

Essay Writing
Service

Find out how the very best essay writing service can help you accomplish more and achieve higher marks today.

Assignment Writing Service

From complicated assignments to tricky tasks, our experts can tackle virtually any question thrown at them.

Dissertation Writing Service

A dissertation (also known as a thesis or research project) is probably the most important piece of work for any student! From full dissertations to individual chapters, we’re on hand to support you.

Coursework Writing Service

Our expert qualified writers can help you get your coursework right first time, every time.

Dissertation Proposal Service

The first step to completing a dissertation is to create a proposal that talks about what you wish to do. Our experts can design suitable methodologies - perfect to help you get started with a dissertation.

Report Writing
Service

Reports for any audience. Perfectly structured, professionally written, and tailored to suit your exact requirements.

Essay Skeleton Answer Service

If you’re just looking for some help to get started on an essay, our outline service provides you with a perfect essay plan.

Marking & Proofreading Service

Not sure if your work is hitting the mark? Struggling to get feedback from your lecturer? Our premium marking service was created just for you - get the feedback you deserve now.

Exam Revision
Service

Exams can be one of the most stressful experiences you’ll ever have! Revision is key, and we’re here to help. With custom created revision notes and exam answers, you’ll never feel underprepared again.