Demonstrative Communication Process

2730 words (11 pages) Essay in Communications

07/08/18 Communications Reference this

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Demonstrative communication includes nonverbal and unwritten communication and involves such things as facial expressions, tone of voice, body language, and so forth. Include the following elements in your paper:

Demonstrative Communication

Communication is defined as the process of sending and receiving information, a process by which information is exchanged between individuals through a common system of symbols, speech, signs, writing, or behavior (Merriam-Webster, 2011). Communication can be verbal or nonverbal, written, or visual. According to Paul Endress, 7% of the communication process is words, 38% is voice tone, and 55% is physiology. Therefore, nonverbal communication comprises 93% of communication; it is made up of the following three areas and their subgroups:

• Body

  • Physical Space
  • Clothing and appearance
  • Locomotion (“kinesics”)

• Physiology

  • Posture
  • Gesture
  • Facial expressions

• Nonverbal

  • Eye contact
  • Touch (“haptics”)
  • Tone of voice (paralanguage)

Research shows that the nonverbal “channels” of communication (how things are said) are often more important than words alone (what is said)(Endress, 2010). Demonstrative communication is that part of the communication process that includes nonverbal and unwritten communications. Demonstrative communication entails sending and receiving wordless messages (Nayab, 2010)

Effective or Ineffective

Effective communication is the foundation for positive interactions in the workplace as well as in social settings. To share ideas, give opinions, or be defined as an individual, one must have effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills. These skills are not only important for the sender but also for the receiver. According to Missouri Western State University’s Laurel J. Dunn, nonverbal communication can be deciphered beginning in early childhood, but interpretation becomes more accurate as the person grows older. Nonverbal cues are responsible for a major portion of the message sent. Even if the verbal message is flawless, one still might communicate ineffectively (Dunn, 2009). For example, one person walks up to another and with a warm smile and direct eye contact, reaches out, gives the other person a firm handshake and in a happy tone of voice says, “I do not like you.” The other person will most likely smile back and agree. Words are only seven percent of the message whereas 93% is nonverbal. If the two conflict, the brain will register the preponderance of the message, which is the nonverbal. In order for a message to be received effectively, the verbal component must coincide with the nonverbal or demonstrative communication. For example, dressing properly, a firm handshake and a friendly demeanor can speak volumes about the kind of person someone is at a job interview. A person can rely on these qualities to reinforce his or her verbal performance (Sutton, 2011). For the receiver, a message can be easily misread or misunderstood. Gestures, appearances, and facial expressions can have different meanings to different people. People can easily misread people they do not know. For example, meeting someone who looks scruffy and assuming that he is lazy. However, later one discovers that he is a brilliant and hard-working artist. Some people might assume that sitting with arms folded means one is defensive. In fact, this can convey feeling cold or simply comfortable. Nonverbal communication should not be solely relied on because there are no hard and fast rules regarding what different gestures and expressions mean (Sutton, 2011). Across cultural lines, one gesture can mean one thing to one cultural group and mean the complete opposite to another. For example, to give someone the thumbs up gesture in America means he has done a good job. If this same gesture were used in Iran, it would mean an obscenity (Endress, 2010).

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Listening and Responding

As with verbal communication, demonstrative communication involves listening and responding. Often an individual can learn more from another’s actions than from his words. Many are the instances in which people can listen with their eyes instead of their ears. For example, a close friend walks out of the classroom after a final examination with her head down, shoulders slumped, and a defeated look on her face. One does not need to ask how well she did. It is important for people to use active listening when receiving any type of message. According to Conflict Research Consortium, University of Colorado (1998), people often are distracted by other stimuli when they are supposed to be paying attention to a speaker. During an argument, people often formulate a response while the other person is talking, which leaves parts of the message unheard or misunderstood. Active listening involves clearing one’s mind of distractions and focusing entirely on the speaker. Once the speaker has completed talking, paraphrase what he said before replying. Active listening can bridge the gap between effective verbal and nonverbal communication (McNamara, 2010).

Conclusion

Demonstrative communication is that part of the communication process that includes nonverbal and unwritten communications; it entails sending and receiving wordless messages. Nonverbal communication comprises 93% of the message. Effective communication is the foundation for positive interactions; it is equally important to the sender and the receiver. It involves listening and responding. One can learn more from others actions than from their words.

References

Conflict Research Consortium, University of Colorado. (1998). Active Listening. Retrieved from http://www.colorado.edu/conflict/peace/treatment/activel.htm

Dunn, L. J. (2009). Nonverbal Communication: Information Conveyed Through the Use of Body Language. Retrieved from http://clearinghouse.missouriwestern.edu/manuscripts/70.php

Endress, P. (2010). Non-Verbal Communication Demonstration. Retrieved from http://www.maximumadvantage.com/nonverbal-communication/non-verbal-communication-demonstration.html

McNamara, M. (2010, August 2). Effective Verbal & Non-Verbal Communication. Retrieved from http://www.livestrong.com/article/192035-effective-verbal-non-verbal-communication/

Merriam-webster.com. (2011). Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/communication

Nayab, N. (2011, June 27). Comparing Various Forms of Communication. Retrieved from http://www.brighthub.com/office/project-management/articles/79297.aspx

Sutton, N. (2011, March 26). Pros & Cons of Nonverbal Communication. Retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/info_8117087_pros-cons-nonverbal-communication.html

Essay 2 (Example)

Demonstrative Communication Introduction There are diverse definitions of communication. In simple words, communication can be defined as the process of transmitting and receiving messages. Communication involves reciprocation of ideas and messages. There are two forms of communication including verbal and non-verbal. Verbal communication involves communication in the form of written and oral messages. However, non-verbal communication is in the form of gestures and images. This paper aims to discuss demonstrative communication and its effectiveness. There are diverse factors that contribute towards the effectiveness of demonstrative communication. The vital components of demonstrative communication include tone, gestures, prior knowledge, and the environment. A slight imbalance in these factors could result in the ineffectiveness of demonstrative communication. Discussion Demonstrative Communication Demonstrative communication is the process in which sending and receiving messages are accompanied by sharing thoughts and information. Demonstrative communication involves both verbal and non-verbal communication. This paper will discuss demonstrative communication and its effectiveness. Some of the components of demonstrative communication include tone, gestures, prior knowledge, and the environment. One of the types of demonstrative communication includes facial expressions. This form of communication also involves tone and body language. Facial expressions can be further classified into positive and negative. Demonstrative communication is effective when it involves positive facial expressions. However, negative facial expressions make demonstrative communication ineffective (Mounter & Smith, 2008). Demonstrative communication also involves nonverbal and unwritten communication. In this form of demonstrative communication, wordless messages are sent and received. Demonstrative non-verbal communication supports verbal communication despite the fact that it can convey messages on its own. Demonstrative communication reinforces verbal communication. Effectiveness of Demonstrative Communication Demonstrative communication can be effective and ineffective. It can be positive and negative for both the sender and receiver. The environment in which communication takes place plays an important role in its effectiveness. Communication may take place directly or indirectly. Most of the time, face-to-face communication is more effective than other forms of communication. Indirect communication takes place through text messages, emails, and instant messages. These messages are also accompanied by facial expressions. In verbal communication, the participants talk directly. It is because of this reason that verbal communication is more effective than non-verbal (Nielsen, 2008). In our everyday life, we use the non-verbal communication more than verbal communication. Demonstrative communication can be perceived by the listener as both positive and negative. The perception of participants is largely influenced by the use of non-verbal forms of communication. The presentation of individuals also …

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Essay 2 (Example)

Demonstrative communication

Communication can be described in many different ways and mean many things. Communication is the process of transmitting, relaying, or sending and receiving messages. The communication process conveys thoughts, ideas, data, and messages either thru speech, writing, body singles, behavior, or kinesics (Cheesebro, Rios, & O’Connor, 2010). Communication can be transmitted verbally and non-verbally. Verbal communication combines written and oral communication while nonverbal communications is express thru body language, facial expressions, eye contact, and gestures. The key to effective communication is the shared understanding of the information between the receiver and sender. It involves the shared understanding of thoughts, feelings, wants needs, and the intentions of the communicators, which may not be openly expressed with words (Cheesebro, Rios, & O’Connor, 2010). The communication process is completed when the receiver understands the message being sent by the sender.

This paper will deliberate demonstrative communication, a style of communication that deals with nonverbal and unwritten communication. This paper will discuss how demonstrative communication can be positive and negative, effective and ineffective, and how it is mutually for the sender and receiver. It will also discuss nonverbal cues, the functions of nonverbal communication, and the importance of demonstrative communication is to listening and responding.

Demonstrative Communication can be Positive and Effective

There are two types of demonstrative communication as stated earlier nonverbal and unwritten. Demonstrative communication involves sending and receiving messages that are used to inform, correct, educate, and share emotions. If the communication process is ineffective it has the influence and power to hurt, confuse, mislead, and even hinder the receivers and the senders rather it is verbal or nonverbal (Papa, 2012). If the communication process is effective then it can leave the sender/receiver with a clear understanding of the message feeling, empowered, informed, educated, and appreciated. An example of this would be, if someone was out on a date and had a good time at the end of the night they might give the other person a kiss to indicate they had a good time and how they feel. On the other hand if someone did not enjoy themselves and was not interested in the other person there will be minimal talk, eye contact, gestures, and that person might receive a handshake or a polite goodnight at the end of the night rather than a kiss. Since the sender and receiver shared understanding and receiving of the message is different it is important the message is clear and both communicators share a clear understanding of the message.

Good communication skills are the key to an individual’s success in life and in this growing economy and globalized world. With the growing demand for these essential skills which have branched off into a wide variety of divisions and techniques, and with advancing technology nonverbal and unwritten communications has grown and advanced in numerous ways (Subapriya, 2009). Statistics vary, but 60%-80% of people’s communication is nonverbal, 7%-10% is actual words, and the rest is tone of voice. Subtle and often subconscious, movements such as facial expressions, gestures, eye contact, and posture send strong messages to the receiver. So in other words sitting up straight and paying attention can let the sender know you are paying attention and are interested in the message they are sending.

Nonverbal Cues and Functions of Nonverbal Communication

Nonverbal communication serves six primary functions complementing, substituting, accenting, contradicting, repeating, and regulating verbal messages. Complementing, nonverbal behavior serves to complement or adds to the verbal message (Subapriya, 2009). It can only modify, or elaborate on the verbal messages. Nonverbal behavior alone would not communicate the intended meaning. Complementing nonverbal message changes the meaning of the verbal message by adding additional insights or information. So when clarity is of the most importance, one should be especially concerned with making verbal and nonverbal behaviors complement to one another (Subapriya, 2009). Nonverbal messages are sent in advance of verbal messages. Before someone can even udder a word their facial expression, clothes, body posture, skin color, and hair style can communicate much about them. Unfortunately, this can be true even if the message sent is not the message you want to communicate. An example of this would be, if someone had a job interview and they showed up wearing dirty clothes, angry facial expression, and bad posture. This would communicate to the interviewer that you may not want the job compared to someone in a suit and tie, a smile on their face, and good eye contact and body posture. The way you present yourself and the others view you is a part of the nonverbal communication process.

Both oral and written communication styles attain perfection with the usage of nonverbal cues. The meaning of a text can be communicated to the listeners and readers through nonverbal signals. Verbal signs and nonverbal cues together in the right proportion can pave the way for meaningful communication (Peng, 2011). Nonverbal cues play a vital role in the success of effective communication. Nonverbal signals operate at two levels. Nonverbal cues in writing which involves features like, headings, titles, subheadings, photographs, captions, figures, graphs, and bar charts etc… Whereas oral communication involves nonverbal signals like eye contact, gestures, posture, facial expressions, tone of voice and body language. Both oral and written nonverbal cues can form a dynamic feature of nonverbal communication to ensure effective communication (Subapriya, 2009). Without effective nonverbal communication the message sent can be misunderstood.

Conclusion

Demonstrative communication involves sending and receiving messages that are used to inform, correct, educate, and share emotions. If the communication process is ineffective it has the influence and power to hurt, confuse, mislead, and even hinder the receivers and the senders rather it is verbal or nonverbal. Good communication skills are the key to an individual’s success in life and in this growing economy and globalized world. Nonverbal behavior alone would not communicate the intended meaning. Complementing nonverbal message changes the meaning of the verbal message by adding additional insights or information. Both oral and written communication styles attain perfection with the usage of nonverbal cues. The key to effective communication is the shared understanding of the information between the receiver and sender. It involves the shared understanding of thoughts, feelings, wants needs, and the intentions of the communicators, which may not be openly expressed with words. The communication process is completed when the receiver understands the message being sent by the sender.

References

Cheesebro, T., Rios, F., & O’Connor, L. (2010). Communicating in the Workplace. Prentice- Hall, MD: Pearson Education, Inc..

Harvard Business School. (2012). Faculty & Research, Amy J.C. Cuddy. Retrieved from http://drfd.hbs.edu

Papa, J. (2012). Effective and Ineffective Communication. Retrieved from http://ehow.com

Peng, H. (August, 2011). Effects of Non-Verbal Communication on College English Classrooms Teachings. US-China Foreign Language, 9(8), 505-516.

Subapriya, K. K. (2009, June). The Importance of Non-Verbal Cues. ICFIA Journal of Soft Skills, 3(2), 37-42.

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