Developing Mathematical Abilities for Children

1470 words (6 pages) Essay

21st Nov 2017 Childcare Reference this

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  • The mathematical development foundation was established in the earliest years. Mathematics learning had built on curiosity and enthusiasm for children to grow naturally. Mathematics at this age, is suitably connected to a child’s world, is more than “getting ready” for school or accelerating them into elementary mathematics. Appropriate mathematical skills challenge young children to explore ideas related to patterns, shapes, numbers, and space with increasing complexity.
  • The child’s cognitive development is how the concentration works and how the children learn, aim and comprehend. As children develop cognitive from pre-lingual and pre-symbolic stage to the use of language and symbols to operate concepts. The ability related to later mathematics learning are also developing. The abilities for mathematics cognitive learning are memory, language skills and the ability to male mental pictures of numbers and space. Young children begin to use their memory when co-operating with others and recall the experiences. Infants will respond to familiar faces and to music. Children begin to notice environment print and they begin to understand the role of letters and numbers as abstract symbols for familiar things.
  • The child’s cognitive development is how the concentration works and how the children learn, aim and comprehend. As children develop cognitive from pre-lingual and pre-symbolic stage to the use of language and symbols to operate concepts. The ability related to later mathematics learning are also developing. The abilities for mathematics cognitive learning are memory, language skills and the ability to male mental pictures of numbers and space. Young children begin to use their memory when co-operating with others and recall the experiences. Infants will respond to familiar faces and to music. Children begin to notice environment print and they begin to understand the role of letters and numbers as abstract symbols for familiar things.
  • Pattern making it is significant as it enables children to identify simple repeated ideas. It is a good basis for finding patterns in numbers later on.
  • Sorting will help children’s understanding of numbers, they should have opportunities to sort as many different materials as possible and in many different ways as they can.
  • Counting and ordering children will need to be come familiar with the number system, they will need to do this through counting and ordering numbers and group of numbers with the same criteria.
  • Recording they will start to record numbers and patterns. They have found out in simple ways, through pictures and simple charts and tallies.
  • When I was observing children there was a child that knew the numbers and knew how to make 3 colours the same. This child is very intelligent, last day we were playing with blocks and I told him to tell me how many reds there are and he told me that there are 10 in all. Then I told him to put 4 block together that are the same colour and he did them without any help. In maths the boy is at a higher level, he knows how to count and to join 4 blocks together
  • I was playing with a boy and we were saying numbers and I told him to count the clothes that there are suspended and he started to count but he didn’t knew the numbers well. He begin to count but he forgot what numbers comes after 1 and he had some problem to remember them so I tried to help him by saying him the beginning of the numbers but he couldn't remember the number that comes after 1. This child needs help in numbers, he need someone to teach him the numbers at home. I think that their parents are not helping him and teaching him the numbers. His level is low and he needs to improve more.
  • The children built their confidence when they have someone who understands them and who play with them. They be confident with people that they have attachment with. When children know things like numbers they feel more confident of saying them. If they are confident their self- esteem will be more high.
  • For children to be fruitful in working with others, and in explanation their own sympathies, they must develop the mathematical language vital to help them express what they believe. Conversation amongst themselves and with a teacher, offers children with chances for social message, and for shared understandings to be exchanging and developed. To do this children need to have self-assurance and don’t be shy of saying the answers or asking a question. If they don’t understand they can’t learn math's well so they need to be confident and ask.
  • Yesterday I was doing an activity with 2 children that are the same age. They are different from each other because one is very confident and likes to do the activities and she is very motivated of doing them. Her self esteem is very high and she is very confident. The other child is very shy and he don’t like to interact with others. He don’t like to do activities because he knows that I'm going to ask him questions for example which color he like most so he need to built some confidence with himself and with others because his self-esteem is very low. He need to communicate more with others even at home his parents need to interact more with him.
  • As with all others areas of learning one will need to build children’s confidence when working on mathematical ideas. From an early age , children should be presented with positive and fun methods of working with mathematical tasks in ways that engage all learners. Adults should take care to ensure that tasks are introduced in a way that stimulates children so that they do think of mathematics as difficult. Occasionally concepts may be difficult to grasp, and children will find new ideas challenging. They should be given plenty of opportunities to use games, investigations and other forms of mathematics, which will develop their skills while also encouraging them to be independent.
  • Last day we were playing, and in the class we have a number line. I was playing with Christian and I asked him to count the numbers. He was very shy at the beginning because he don’t believe in himself and he don’t have confidence with others. Then I helped him by praising him and told him that he is able to count them and I knew that he know them so he began to count them. He needed some support and courage to built confidence and to feel comfortable talking to me.
  • I'm going to talk about the theories that are involved in mathematical development. I’m going to talk about Piaget and his conservation of numbers according to his constructivist theory.
  • Constructivism, first developed by Piaget, views learning of mathematics as the building of meaning and understanding based on the modeling of reality, the examination of pattern, and the gaining of a mathematical nature. Though I have chosen conservation in mathematics as the test case the account Piaget provided is expected to apply more usually to his entire composition, and I believe is further genuine by changes in his thought he also draw upon other examples to make his case. He make no effort to define the different stages of Piagetian development but make position to them when necessary; that wasn't his focus. More, he use Skinner as the exemplar of behaviorism even though there are other varieties. The reasons for doing so rest with his supremacy among instructors of all punishments and the potential benefits to justifying the wide-spread mistake of his work, too.
  • Language and hearing processing shortfalls affect ability to learn language and math concepts and solve problems. Students may have amenable or communicative language problems that can considerably affect their learning and ability to express what they do not comprehend or show how they solved problems. They can help them by teaching them those things:
  • Partner with Teachers to Manage Language and Auditory Processing Deficits.
  • Use Hands-on Materials to Improve Your Child's Math Comprehension
  • Re-Write Word Problems to Enhance Auditory Comprehension
  • Provide Step-by-Step Models of Problem Solving
  • We were doing an activity about math's and I was explaining them sum and what they need to do some of the children couldn't understand the concept of the sum so I needed to explain it again and more in detail. If I didn’t explained it again and more in detailed they wouldn't understand and learn the sum.
  • When I was doing the activity some of the children didn’t understood the vocabulary because was a little bit hard for them so I asked them where they didn’t understood and I explained it better.

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