Pre-Primary 5 day Instructional Delivery 

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Over the last five days, I have had the pleasure of creating and teaching centers in Mrs. Katie Westvig’s preschool classroom. Her school preschool resides in a small community of about 1600 people. The school is a public school in a rural area that has 300 students in grade’s pre-k through 8th grade. Of those students, 57% receive free or reduced lunch (NICHE 2018). In Mrs. Westvig’s preschool classroom, she services 16 children between the ages three and five, all of whom have IEP’s. In Mrs. Westvig’s classroom is an inclusive classroom, with students ranging from general-education children to children with Down syndrome, as well as children who need speech therapy or social skills. For this week of instructional planning, I planned a week of spring summer activities for the children to do inside the classroom. I started day one with the dramatic play center, where I created an ice cream shop where the children played and created their version of an ice cream person and a cashier we also worked on shapes in this area.

On the second day, I did a sensory table center for the children that contained water beads and bugs. What goes better with Ice Cream then bugs? I also chose this center because the children were experiencing ants in the classroom so it was a big topic the week before. I wanted to find out what they remembered about the bugs and work on their counting and other math skills.

On the third day, I created a math and manipulatives area. In this, area the children worked on making ice cream cones out of paper, tape and pom poms. Then we worked on counting and shape identification. I also included matching activities in this area for the children to work on matching and patterns. This was a goal the teacher had for them in their outcomes.

On the fourth day, I did a storytime book and an activity for Mat Man who is a character in the classroom curriculum. For this activity, I read mat man shapes with the children, and then I broke the children into groups of two to create Mat Man with the curriculum pieces. This also worked on their math skills.

Lastly, on the fifth day, I created a block center. In this block center, we worked on measurements. To do this, I had the children each build a tower as high as they could, and we measured it against the wall. Then we counted the blocks, which were all different shapes. We also talked about what shapes they used. As you can see most of my centers revolved around math, shapes, and counting, which is a low area for these children. I choose to work on the area of math, based on conversations with the lead classroom teacher and what the children needed to work on. I felt that working on counting, shapes, patterns, matching, and measurements were right on target for the children to reach their needed outcomes for the year. Throughout this week with the children, I was able to do a lot of different things. I was able to plan and design meaningful learning environments that were healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging. I was also able to facilitate my role as teacher and deliver my lessons, as well as, assess what areas the children achieved and fell behind in over the course of the week.

I feel that throughout this week I was able to use my developmental knowledge to create a healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environment. Each day I created a lesson plan that was developmentally appropriate according to NAEYC, and each lesson met Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards. According to NAEYC, “good preschool teachers maintain appropriate expectations, providing each child with the right mix of challenge, support, sensitivity, and stimulation. With their knowledge, skill, and training, teachers—in collaboration with families—can ensure that programs promote and enhance every child’s learning (NAEYC. N.d.). I feel that the expectations that I set going into each of these lessons were developmentally appropriate. I know this because the expectations I set were based on Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards. Each goal I chose I considered what each child needed to work on based on classroom outcomes and then compared them to the standards to write my expectations for each lesson.

Planning

In regard to planning my centers, I think that they had a positive impact upon the children’s learning. According to Elizabeth Jones’ five dimensions of a learning environment, the first dimension is the hard/soft dimension. This dimension refers “to the sensory responsiveness and physical comfort of the environment” (Jones & Prescott 2008).  I feel that in this area I covered both hard and soft to create a positive environment.  I feel that in creating the dramatic play environment, I made it very colorful and inviting. It had a good combination of both hard and soft to create a relaxing use it how you want to environment. The flooring in this area was carpeted so it decreased fatigue. The furniture in this area was hard as well. However, the materials within the area were both hard and soft making this area a great combination. In the sensory table area, I also incorporated both hard and soft materials. The water beads were colorful and softened the environment while the table itself was hard, as well as the floor. The bugs that I included were rubbery and bendable giving the children to opportunity to move them into different positions before they drew them. This area also gave them a wet/dry feel to their day. In the math and manipulatives center I feel that this area was harder then soft. The soft things were the flex seating that is used in the classroom. It is not just regular chairs. There are also cushioned stools to sit on. I used those in this area. The other soft thing was the pom poms. These were colorful as well. The hard things would have been the table, the paper, and the tile floor. For story time, this gathering was on the carpet. I used it as an introduction to small-group activity. The carpet in this area gave children the opportunity to sit. However, they felt comfortable. Although they had been taught that criss-cross applesauce was how we sit during a story. Afterword, they could sit however they wanted. The materials for this activity were both hard and soft as I used wood and foam to build Mat Man. In the block area, this environment was both a combination of hard and soft. The blocks that I used were foam blocks of different shapes and colors. The floor was carpeted, and the wall that we used were brick. The children stood, laid, and sat upon the floor to build their towers.

The next dimension is open/closed. “This refers to the level to which the program, material, storage, and educators restrict or allow children to make choices about what they will do” (Jones & Prescott 2008). I feel that my environment was more open than closed. Children were able to play with material as they saw fit. They were able to create art their way, for example, when they created Mat Man and drew their version of the bug. It was theirs not something they recreated to the T. They each also got to choose what center they wanted to play in. I did not make them play at my center but wanted to see how many would come and play each day. I was successful in that I got all the children to get involved. The only area that I think might have been a little closed was the block area and the math and manipulatives area. These two areas had activities that were planned. However, I let the children take the wheel after I showed them what to do. If it did not come out the way, I had hoped it was okay.

The third dimension in Elizabeth Jones’ five dimensions of a learning environment is intrusion/seclusion. This dimension “refers to the presence of both welcome and unwelcome stimuli; seclusion refers to privacy, wither welcome or unwelcome” (Jones & Prescott 2008).  For the centers I created, I think that they fit both areas. Children were able to do the activities with other children or do them alone. It was up to them. However, this classroom did not have space for children to be alone that was specifically for this reason.

The next dimension is low mobility/high mobility. In this dimension, Elizabeth Jones “refers to the level of muscular involvement and movement” (Jones & Prescott 2008). I believe in this dimension, I created more of a low mobility environment because we were inside. We used more small-muscle and sedentary activities then gross motor activities. Not that this is a bad thing, but I could have created a movement activity to go with my book at story time.

The last dimension that Elizabeth Jones identifies in her five dimensions of a learning environment is the simple/complex/super dimension. This dimension “refers to the ways that materials and equipment hold children’s interest” (Jones & Prescott 2008). I think in all areas, I achieved super level. I had three or more materials for the children to use. This, in turn, held their interest longer than if I had had just one or two items. Also if I notice that a child was losing interest, I tried to add a material or accommodate the lesson to challenge the student. Jone’s tells us that “complex toys hold children’s interest 4 times longer than simple toys; super toys hold children’s interest 8 times longer than simple toys” (Jones & Prescott 2008). This to me says that the more control over their creativity they have, the longer they will be attentive to a center.
Speaking of control over their creativity that leads me to my next subject and that is how I planned my centers to support children’s autonomy. Autonomy to me means giving children the power and opportunity to make their one decisions on how to do something without an adult telling them how to do it. It’s letting them figure out what works, what doesn’t and letting it go if they do not get it exactly the way you would have done it, even if they make a mistake. I planned each of my centers so that children could be introduced to the activity that was there. Then they could choose what to do with the materials. I was there in each center playing with the children creating challenges and accommodations as needed. However, I let them play with the materials in ways that they saw fit as long as it was not harmful to them, like putting things in their mouth or throwing things.

During my planning, I was able to design meaningful learning environments for each child. I also was able to integrate literacy, math, science, and arts into the curriculum. When planning my lessons I had to consider the differences between each of the children as this was an inclusive classroom. I had to take all of the different verbal and non-verbal accommodations as well as motor skills accommodations into account. For children with different non-verbal skills, I used picture cues as well as had the teacher use her sign language to help me out. For children who needed motor skills accommodations like scissors, I used the hand over hand method for this activity because that was what was in their IEP.  I also tried to integrate two or more content areas into each center I planned. To do this, I thought of an activity that I would like to do with the children. Then I looked through the learning standards and content areas and choose ones that would fit into my lesson. This enabled me to make sure that my lesson was appropriate for the age group, and that I was not expecting too much from them.

Lastly, for this area, I feel that my prior observations of play and non-play behaviors played a major role in what I chose to implement as far as centers go. I chose centers that I knew children would be interested in as well as watched what was going on in the classroom. For example, the children were fascinated by the ants that came into the classroom. So I knew from this, that putting the bugs in the water beads would be a big hit, and it was.

Instructional Delivery

     I think that instructional delivery was my best area. I feel that I did an excellent job in my roles and communication with children to facilitate their meaningful learning and play. I took on the roles of facilitator, model, coach, storyteller, observer, and questioner. I do not think that any one of these roles is more important than the other. I was the model in that I started the activity by showing the children how to use or do something. I even started by being the cashier in the dramatic play area. This got the ball rolling, and the children had a blast. I was the coach. Cheering them on by telling them that they could do it or one more piece. I was the storyteller when I created or read a story to go with what we were doing. I was the observer when I watched what they were doing and took notes as to whether it was achieved or still needed to be worked on at a later time. I was the questioner. As you will see in the video attached to this document. I asked children all kinds of questions. How are they different, what else could you use, what shape is this, can you tell me what you do with that, is that cold or hot, why is it cold? I could go on and on with questions I asked. One of the comments I received all week from my host teacher was that I was very good at asking open-ended questions. She also told me that she enjoyed that I played with the children not just observed the whole time.

During the instructional delivery of each lesson, I offered quite a lot of praise and encouragement. During clean up time, I always offered encouragement as to how well they were doing it on their own. I praised the children who cleaned up all the pieces without missing any. During the center time, I encouraged a child to use a glove and touch the bead because they scared him. I told him that “even though it looks scary it feels really neat, and I bet with this glove you won’t even know it’s wet. Let’s try it together.” I also praised children when they were able to write their names by telling them “look you did it by yourself. Now you can show your friends.” I think because of my use in both children were more eager to show me that they could complete of doing something on their own, especially with cleaning up at the end of centers.
Assessment

Child 1 work samples

C:UsersAnyoneDesktop1527211693601.jpgC:UsersAnyoneDesktopChild 1002.jpgMat Man                                                                          Bug from sensory table

Completed work at Math and Manipulatives table

C:UsersAnyoneDesktop�523180937.jpgC:UsersAnyoneDesktop�523180937c.jpg

Child 2 work samples

C:UsersAnyoneDesktopChild 1003.jpgMat Man                                                                          Bug from sensory table

C:UsersAnyoneDesktop�523180955.jpg

C:UsersAnyoneDesktop�523180936.jpgC:UsersAnyoneDesktop�523180937a.jpgCompleted work at Math and Manipulatives table

During my instructional delivery, I had my host teacher take a Video with both children during center time participating. The first video is me reading Mat Man and the children responding to questions about the story. The second video is of my two focus children working together to create Mat Man on the carpet. I have uploaded these to my Google drive you can retrieve them from:

Story/ Circle time interaction https://drive.google.com/file/d/1SvSqdjnP9XxtrUdDPYOKf5xSaWJC9eWD/view?usp=sharing

Child 1 and 2 building Mat Man together

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1w2rV0mncFPz32xLh4eZoBl0eM2KGWMA2/view?usp=sharing

The work samples that I collected for each child correlate with things that were going on in the classroom during the week. I had a really hard time collecting data during center time as far as pictures go because the school does not allow cell phone use in the classroom. I did manage to get a camera on the second day and got pictures of Mat Man, their bugs, and math matching sheets that they completed as well as video from the story time day.

I started following child ones progress by playing with him in dramatic play. We worked on language skills as he struggles with speech. Especially the TH sound. During this time I observed child 1 meet the learning objectives of engage in dramatic play materials, participating in cooperative play with other students, using his gross motor skills by moving tables, chairs and other items during play, and fine motor skills by using smaller items such as money and pom poms during play as well as increase his language and problem-solving skills as he played in this area with his peers and work out play scenarios with me. In this area, he completed five of the goals I had set.

I also observed child 2 in the same area during a different time. During my observation, I noted that she met all the goals in this area. She was able to express her creativity by developing themes to play out based on materials given. She participated in cooperative play with other students within the class by being the customer at the shop. She also increased her language and problem-solving skills as she played in this area with their peers and work out play scenarios. When she interacted being the customer. She developed her socio-emotional skills by playing out situations from her own life or from pretend theme situations, which help her learn more about herself, her friends and the world around her. She developed her gross motor skills by moving tables, chairs and other items during play as well as her fine motor skills by using smaller items such as money, pom poms, utensils, etc.

The second day I observed the children at the sensory table. I observed child 1 meeting the learning objectives of using prediction and questioning to tell me what he thought I might feel like. As well as sharing and taking turns, using hand-eye coordination, enhancing science concepts and number concepts. I also observed him drawing his interpretation of a bug he found in the water beads. I observed child 2 meeting the learning objectives of enhancing her observation skills, using prediction and questioning to tell me what she thought I might feel like. She also increased her verbal expression skills by expressing her feelings and thoughts about what she would find. I observed her taking turns and sharing, and using hand-eye coordination. She also predicted cause and effect with what will happen if I, type of questions. She increased her science concepts as well as her number concepts during this center activity.

On day three, I observed the children at the math and manipulative center. During this time, I observed children 1 and 2 meet the learning objectives of developing fine motor skills by using smaller items and expressing their creativity by developing their own types of ice cream. Muddy, grape is the new flavor of the year. Lastly, the both enhance their math skills by counting and matching pom poms and worksheets as pictured above.

Day four was the day for story time. During story time, I set the objectives that I wanted the children to meet as interacting with peers during story time, develop comprehension skills, sharpen listening skills, and increase vocabulary by using rhyming words and following directions. During the reading, both children participated and showed growth in these areas. The activity at the end showed that both children were able to work together and that they had developed their shape concepts.

On the last day, it was block center day. On this day, I observed the child 1 using his fine motor skills and gross motor skills. He also classified blocks by shape, size, and color. He experimented with balance and tested out ideas as to how to make the tallest tower. Counting is still hard for him. Child 2 met all the same goals but also met recognizing quantity and understanding number concepts in this center.

I tried to do observations that produced no intrusion into the activities with the children. So the types of informal assessment that I chose to use were natural observations, collecting data, checklists, and children’s work samples for portfolios. I did this by taking notes, pictures, and video when I remembered. I was able to use this material for Portfolios that I could share with parents.

Challenges that I faced observing and recording were remembering to do it. I got so wrapped up in teaching and playing that I think that it would have been easier to record all five days. However, I had to go out and buy a camcorder as phones were not allowed into the classroom per school policy. I think that had I been able to use my phone, data recording would have been easier. I was trying to do my observations and recording doing work samples, but that is really hard some things just need to be videotaped. I think that this should be a requirement for all teachers to have. So I would have to say that I was very bad in this area. I could have gotten more.

Next Steps

Throughout the week I learned that all of these children vary on their learning scale. Some of them are on point for kindergarten readiness and some of them still have a long ways to go. I also noticed that age played a part in their skill levels. I also learned that they do not like to have planned activities but rather just have things set out and use them as they like. So if I want to have them create something. I am better off just putting out the materials and letting them use their imaginations because getting them to create say an ice cream cone. Will turn into whatever they are thinking of at the time. However, I also learned that they are eager to do the worksheet. Especially the ones that are interactive with a piece like a puzzle. They really liked them. As far as instructional delivery goes I feel that they were very responsive to the information that I presented. As you can see even during story time they say and interact with the book even though they have probably heard it one hundred times.

The one learning objective that I had a hard time meeting was language development. I think that this will come with time and intentionality. Another objective that the group struggled with was counting. Most of the students are low in this area. The ones that are advanced I thought they were on board. So I would definitely incorporate higher numbers and more advanced counting activities for them. For the ones still struggling I think working more on one to one correspondence and just plain finger counting might help.

Lastly, I think to enrich, enhance and expand opportunities for learning in the centers I could make them more curriculum-based, rather than theme based. I could include more of the Mat Man curriculum that they use in this classroom. I feel that this would help the children increase their skill abilities in all areas. I also feel that if each center had specific activities for the children to accomplish that this would increase their knowledge base. For example in the block area instead of their just being block to build with, including books of famous buildings so that the children can recreate or in the science center instead of just looking at items making it more purposeful by giving them something to compare or do with the items. I also think that their needs to be more accommodations thought out when planning centers for the children with disabilities. Some of the toys are difficult for them to play with so having different options for all children is a better idea.

In conclusion from planning and delivering instructions to pre-primary children, I learned that you have to look at all aspects of planning and each child when creating a lesson plan. I also learned that sometimes things do not go as planned and that is okay. Just go with the flow, the kids have no idea what you are supposed to be doing. Just make it fun and meaningful. Second, after this teaching experience, I do feel that my philosophy of learning and teaching changed a little. I still believe that the role of a teacher is to be the coordinator of learning and that children learn best when they are in their least restrictive environment. As well as that the main purpose of education is to develop a student’s ability to use critical thinking skills. The part that has changed for me is that is that I also believe that my role as a teacher is to also make the necessary changes and accommodates to the classroom so that learning for everyone is at the level it needs to be not just what the curriculum tells me. This fieldwork has also given me more confidence in my ability to write developmentally appropriate plans for children to achieve the desired outcome. I feel that the feedback from the host teacher was most valuable because I was slightly unsure of myself during the beginning. Lastly, the thing that I take away from this experience that will impact me professionally is that there are a lot of ways to document observations. It might not always be what you need but it can be used in some aspect of proving outcomes were met. I also learned that children do not care what they are doing as long as you make it fun and play with them. They just want your attention all of the time. I also learned that teachers love to have people come in and take over their classroom it gives them a break to just sit back and watch what is going on. I need to remember this if I ever get asked. The most important thing though is my love for children with disabilities. I grew a greater appreciation and understanding working with the students in this classroom.

Lesson Plan Template

Name: Melissa Christoffel     Date: 05/21/2018

Grade Level: Pre-K      Subject: Dramatic Play

Topic/Theme: Ice Cream Shop                            Time Allotted: 45Min for centers

  1. State Adopted, Common Core, or National Standards

Learning Standard 5.A: Demonstrate growing interest and abilities in writing.

5.A.ECa: Experiment with writing tools and materials.

5.A.ECb: Use scribbles, letter-like forms, or letters/words to represent written language.

Learning Standard 15.D: Explore concepts about trade as an exchange of goods or services.

15.D.ECa: Begin to understand the use of trade or money to obtain goods and services.

Learning Standard 19.A: Demonstrate physical competency and control of large and small muscles.

19.A.ECa: Engage in active play using gross- and fine-motor skills.

19.A.ECd: Use eye-hand coordination to perform tasks.

19.A.ECe: Use writing and drawing tools with some control.

Learning Standard 31.B: Use communication and social skills to interact effectively with others.

31.B.ECa: Interact verbally and nonverbally with other children.

31.B.ECb: Engage in cooperative group play.

31.B.ECc: Use socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing, and taking turns.

Learning Standard 31.C:Demonstrate an ability to prevent, manage, and resolve interpersonal conflicts in constructive ways.

31.C.ECa: Begin to share materials and experiences and take turns.

  1. Learning Objectives Associated with the Standards
  • Children will engage in dramatic play materials
  • Children will participate in cooperative play with other students
  • Children will develop socio-emotional skills by playing out situations from their own life or from pretend theme situations, which help them learn more about themselves, their friends and the world around them.
  • Children will develop gross motor skills by moving tables, chairs and other items during play.
  • Children will develop fine motor skills by using smaller items (such as money, pom poms utensils etc.) during play.
  • Children will Increase their language and problem-solving skills as they play in this area with their peers and work out play scenarios.
  • Children will express their creativity by developing themes to play out.

C. Language Objectives:

Learning Standard 1.A: Demonstrate understanding through age-appropriate responses.

1.A.ECb: Respond appropriately to questions from others.

Learning Standard 1.B: Communicate effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.

1.B.ECa: Use language for a variety of purposes.

1.B.ECb: With teacher assistance, participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners (e.g., peers and adults in both small and large groups) about age-appropriate topics and texts.

1.B.ECc: Continue a conversation through two or more exchanges.

Learning Standard 1.E: Use increasingly complex phrases, sentences, and vocabulary.

1.E.ECb: Exhibit curiosity and interest in learning new words heard in conversations and books.

Key Vocabulary in Lesson:

The oral language used by people in Ice Cream Shop:

Shopkeeper:

“How may I help you?”                                           “That will be …..dollars.”

“What kind would you like?”                                  “Thank you for coming.”

“Have a great day.”                                                  “Can I get you anything else?”

“What kind of topping would you like?”

Customer:

“I would like 3 scoops of ice cream.”                      “Here is the money.”

“I think I will have strawberry.”                              “Thank you.”

“Do you have any drinks?”                                       “Yes please.”

Content vocabulary (source for definitions http://www.wordcentral.com/home.html):

Flavors: The blend of taste and smell sensations caused by a substance in the mouth. The way something tastes.

Ice cream cone: a crisp cone-shaped wafer for holding ice cream.

Shop: A place of business

Cashier: An employee of a store or restaurant who receives and records payments made by customers.

Scoop: A round utensil with a handle for dipping out soft food (as ice cream)

Cherries: the fruit of a cherry tree.

Total: Making up the whole. The sum of things added.

Enjoy: To take pleasure from

Big: Large in size

Huge: Of great size or area

Toppings: A food served on top of another to make it look or taste better

D.  Prior Learning and Requisite Skills Needed for this Lesson

  • Children need to have an idea of what an Ice Cream Shop looks like.
  • Children need to know what Ice cream looks like.

E.  Instructional and Learning Tasks

I will introduce the dramatic play center at the beginning of center time. The center will be set up and inviting. I will explain to the student what they can do in this center. I will also show them the clipboards so that they may order and take orders for their ice cream, as well as how to pay for it. I will also show them how to get the money out of the register and how to use the order forms. Then I will start by playing the cashier at the store and have the children role play with me. After they start to really play, I will step back and let the children play in their own way as I observe and help facilitate and prompt as necessary. At the end of center time, we will sit in a circle and discuss what they did in the center.

F.  Extension

In order to extend this area if I have time, I will add different kinds of community workers that could come into order.

G.  Formal and Informal Assessment

I will observe and record students as they engage in dramatic play. I will look at how they interact with other students, what materials they use, and how they use them. I will document this with antidotal notes to be put in their outcomes.

 

H. Instructional Resources and Materials

For this area, I will need:

a refrigerator, stove, dishes, cups, utensils, different types of fake frozen treats, bowls, spoons, aprons, bowls, as well as play food, a table and chairs, play telephones, dolls, clothes for the dolls, puppet stand for cashier counter, signs, menus, and order forms, clip boards, small pom poms, large pom poms, ice cream scooper, empty ice cream containers, play cash register, play money, tongs, spoons, containers, counting books, item tags for shelfs

Lesson Plan Template

Name: Melissa Christoffel     Date: 05/22/2018

Grade Level: Pre-K      Subject: Manipulatives

Topic/Theme: Ice Cream manipulative area  Time allotted: 45Min for centers

A: State Adopted, Common Core, or National Standards

Learning Standard 5.A: Demonstrate growing interest and abilities in writing.

5.A.ECa: Experiment with writing tools and materials.

5.A.ECb: Use scribbles, letter-like forms, or letters/words to represent written language.

Learning Standard 6.A: Demonstrate a beginning understanding of numbers, number names, and numerals.

6.A.ECa: Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in small sets up to 5.

Learning Standard 8.A:Explore objects and patterns.

8.A.ECa: Sort, order, compare and describe objects according to characteristics or attribute(s).

Learning Standard 19.A: Demonstrate physical competency and control of large and small muscles.

19.A.ECd: Use eye-hand coordination to perform tasks.

19.A.ECe: Use writing and drawing tools with some control.

Learning Standard 31.B: Use communication and social skills to interact effectively with others.

31.B.ECa: Interact verbally and nonverbally with other children.

31.B.ECc: Use socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing, and taking turns.

31.C.ECa: Begin to share materials and experiences and take turns.

B. Learning Objectives Associated with the Standards

  • Children will develop fine motor skills by using smaller items (such as money, pom poms utensils etc.) during play.
  • Children will Increase their language and problem-solving skills as they play in this area with their peers and work out math problems.
  • Children will express their creativity by developing their own types of ice cream.
  • Children will enhance their math skills by counting and matching pom poms.

C. Language Objectives:

Learning Standard 1.A: Demonstrate understanding through age-appropriate responses.

1.A.ECb: Respond appropriately to questions from others.

Learning Standard 1.B: Communicate effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.

1.B.ECa: Use language for a variety of purposes.

1.B.ECb: With teacher assistance, participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners (e.g., peers and adults in both small and large groups) about age-appropriate topics and texts.

1.B.ECc: Continue a conversation through two or more exchanges.

Learning Standard 1.E: Use increasingly complex phrases, sentences, and vocabulary.

1.E.ECb: Exhibit curiosity and interest in learning new words heard in conversations and books.

Key Vocabulary in Lesson:

The oral language used by people for math:

Count them for me?    Can you add more?

How many do you have?     Do you think that is too many?

I have….

Show me how to use the tape?

Content vocabulary (source for definitions http://www.wordcentral.com/home.html):

Add: to combine (numbers) into a single number that has the same total value

Many: amounting to a large number

Count: to add one by one so as to find the total number of a group of things

Flavors: The blend of taste and smell sensations caused by a substance in the mouth. The way something tastes.

Ice cream cone: a crisp cone-shaped wafer for holding ice cream.

Shop: A place of business

Big: Large in size

Huge: Of great size or area

Toppings: A food served on top of another to make it look or taste better

  1. Prior Learning and Requisite Skills Needed for this Lesson
  • Children need to have an idea of idea of counting.
  • Children need to know what Ice cream looks like.
  1. Instructional and Learning Tasks

I will introduce manipulatives center at the beginning of center time. The center will be set up and inviting. I will explain to the student what they can do in this center. Then I will invite the students to help me make pretend ice cream cones. I will show them how to fold the brown paper into a cone, cut off the excess, and tape ends together. Then I will have them place a large pom pom on top to act as the ice cream. I will then sit with them and help them count. At the end of center time, we will sit in a circle and discuss what they did in the center. The children will get take their cones and a baggy with pom poms in it home to use and practice counting. At end of centers, I will read a book about counting and have the children count out loud with me so that I can see which ones picked up more numbers.

  1. Extension

In order to extend this area if I have time, I will add interactive worksheets that the children can complete. These will have pieces to Velcro onto the page.

  1. Formal and Informal Assessment

I will observe and record students as they count. I will make on a checklist for the teacher what number the child can count to on their own before missing a number.

 

H.  Instructional Resources and Materials

For this area, I will need:

Small and large pom poms, brown paper, markers, scissors, tape and glue sticks, counting books, interactive worksheets

Lesson Plan Template

Name: Melissa Christoffel     Date: 05/23/2018

Grade Level: Pre-K      Subject: Sensory table

Topic/Theme: Summer/ bugs                                              Time Allotted: 45Min for centers

A.  State Adopted, Common Core, or National Standards

Learning Standard 11.A:  Develop beginning skills in the use of science and engineering practices, such as observing, asking questions, solving problems, and drawing conclusions.

11.A.ECa: Express wonder and curiosity about their world by asking questions, solving problems, and designing things.

11.A.ECf : Make meaning from experience and information by describing, talking, and thinking about what happened during an investigation.

Learning Standard 12.A: Understand that living things grow and change.

12.E.Eca: observe and describe earth, water, and air.

Learning Standard 13.A: Understand rules to follow when investigating and exploring.

13.A.ECa: understand safety practices.

Learning Standard 30.A:  Develop positive relationships with peers and adults.

30.A.ECb: use communication skills

30.A.ECe: Respect for materials

30.C.ECD: Demonstrate engagement and attention

Learning Standard 31.B:  Use communication and social skills to interact effectively with others.

31.B.ECa: Interact with peers

Learning Standard 31.C:Demonstrate an ability to prevent, manage, and resolve interpersonal conflicts in constructive ways.

31.C.ECa: Begin to share materials and experiences and take turns.

B.  Learning Objectives Associated with the Standards

  • Children will enhance observation skills by looking through the bin.
  • Children will use prediction and questioning to tell me what item may feel like to the touch.
  • Children will increase verbal expression skills by expressing feelings and thoughts.
  • Children will increase their emotional skills by taking turns and sharing.
  • Children will increase fine motor skills by using hand-eye coordination.
  • Children will predict cause and effect with what will happen if I, type of questions.
  • Children will increase their knowledge of science and number concepts

C.   Language Objectives:

Learning Standard 1.A: Demonstrate understanding through age-appropriate responses.

1.A.ECa: Follow simple directions

1.A.ECb: Respond appropriately to questions from others.

Key Vocabulary in Lesson:

The oral language used by people at the sensory table:

“How does it feel?”                                    “How many do you see?”

“Is it wet?”                                                 “What do you think you will find?”

Content vocabulary (source for definitions http://www.wordcentral.com/home.html):

Wet: containing, covered with, or soaked with liquid

Dry: free or nearly free from liquid and especially water

Soft: having a pleasing, comfortable, or soothing effect

Hard: not easily penetrated, cut, or divided into parts

Insect: any of a class of arthropods (as butterflies, true bugs, two-winged flies, bees, and grasshoppers) with the body clearly divided into a head, thorax, and abdomen, with three pairs of jointed legs, and usually with one or two pairs of wings

Arthropods: any of a phylum of invertebrate animals (as insects, arachnids, and crustaceans) having a segmented body, jointed limbs, and a shell of chitin that is shed periodically

D. Prior Learning and Requisite Skills Needed for this Lesson

  • Children need to have an idea of what bugs they might find in our area.
  • Children need to know what safety rules in the science area.

E. Instructional and Learning Tasks

I will introduce the sensory table at the beginning of center time. The center will be set up and inviting. I will explain to the student what they can do in this center. There will be a sensory table with water beads in it. I will place various bugs in the beads for the children to find. I will instruct the two children in this area to find two bugs, place them on a paper towel and bring them to the table. Once the children have sat down we will talk about what they found. They will then use markers, crayons or pencils to draw their bugs. These pictures will then be put in their portfolios.

F.   Extension

In order to extend this area if I have time, I will add a search and find all the bugs in the bin. The children would work together to find all of the bugs on the picture chart board and place them in the squares.

G.   Formal and Informal Assessment

I will observe and record students as they engage in finding and drawing. I will look at how they interact with others, what materials they use, and how they use them. I will document this with work samples for their portfolios.

 

H.  Instructional Resources and Materials

For this area, I will need:

Water beads, water, plastic bugs, paper, crayons, gloves, bug chart board, markers, pencils, portfolios, sensory table, paper towels,

Lesson Plan Template

Name: Melissa Christoffel    Date: 05/24/2018

Grade Level: Pre-K     Subject: Large Group/Small Group

Topic/Theme: Story Time activity   Time allotted: 45Min for centers

A.  State Adopted, Common Core, or National Standards

Learning Standard 1.B: Communicate effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.

1.B.ECa Use language for a variety of purposes.

Learning Standard2.B: Recognize key ideas and details in stories.

2.B.ECa: With teacher assistance, ask and answer questions about books read aloud.

Learning Standard 4.C: Demonstrate an emerging understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).

4.C.ECb: With teacher assistance, recognize and match words that rhyme.

Learning Standard 9.A: Recognize, name, and match common shapes.

9.A.ECa: Recognize and name common two- and three-dimensional shapes and describe some of their attributes (e.g., number of sides, straight or curved lines).

Learning Standard 19.A: Demonstrate physical competency and control of large and small muscles.

19.A.ECd: Use eye-hand coordination to perform tasks.

Learning Standard 31.B: Use communication and social skills to interact effectively with others.

31.B.ECa: Interact verbally and nonverbally with other children.

31.B.ECc: Use socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing, and taking turns.

31.C.ECa: Begin to share materials and experiences and take turns.

B.  Learning Objectives Associated with the Standards

  • Children will identify common shapes.
  • Children will work in pairs.
  • Children will listen to the story and answer questions.

C. Language Objectives:

Learning Standard 1.A: Demonstrate understanding through age-appropriate responses.

1.A.ECb: Respond appropriately to questions from others.

Learning Standard 1.B: Communicate effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.

1.B.ECa: Use language for a variety of purposes.

1.B.ECb: With teacher assistance, participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners (e.g., peers and adults in both small and large groups) about age-appropriate topics and texts.

1.B.ECc: Continue a conversation through two or more exchanges.

Learning Standard 1.E: Use increasingly complex phrases, sentences, and vocabulary.

1.E.ECb: Exhibit curiosity and interest in learning new words heard in conversations and books.

Key Vocabulary in Lesson:

The oral language used by people for books and shapes:

How many sides?         Can you add more?

How many do you have?          Are you missing any pieces?

Can you show me what Mat Man looks like?     How many sides does a circle have?

What else might he need?

Content vocabulary (source for definitions http://www.wordcentral.com/home.html):

Square: an instrument having at least one right angle and two straight edges used to draw or test right angles

Circle: a line segment that is curved so that its ends meet and every point on the line is equally far away from a single point inside

Moon: a figure or thing that represents or resembles the moon in the earth’s sky.

Star: a figure or thing (as an asterisk or badge) with five or more points that represents or resembles a star

Shapes: to take on or approach a definite form

Mat Man: Character in our classroom

D.  Prior Learning and Requisite Skills Needed for this Lesson

  • Children need to have an idea of idea shapes.
  • Children need to know what Mat Man looks like.

E.  Instructional and Learning Tasks

I will call children to the carpet and have them sit crisscross applesauce. I will ask them what they think the book I am holding is about. Then I will read the book Mat Man Shapes to them. During the reading, I will stop and ask questions on every page as to what shape Mat Man will be. Then when the reading is done I will break the children into groups and have them use pieces of foam and wood to build Mat Man.

F.  Extension

In order to extend this area if I have time, I will add different pieces such as yarn hair and bows to make Mat Man, Mat Girl. I will also add inner parts such a stomach to see if the children know where it goes, as well as clothes and shoes so they can dress him.

G.  Formal and Informal Assessment

I will observe and record students using video format. This can be shared at parent-teacher conferences and put into their online portfolio section or webpage for the classroom.

 

H.  Instructional Resources and Materials

For this area, I will need:

Mat Man shapes book, all pieces of Mat Man, extra pieces for Mat Man such as hair, bows, clothes and inter parts.

Lesson Plan Template

Name: Melissa Christoffel    Date: 05/25/2018

Grade Level: Pre-K     Subject: Large Group/Small Group

Topic/Theme: Block Center    Time allotted: 45Min for centers

  1. State Adopted, Common Core, or National Standards

Learning Standard 7A: Measure objects and quantities using direct comparison methods and nonstandard units.

7.A.ECb Use nonstandard units to measure attributes such as length and capacity.

7.A.ECc Use vocabulary that describes and compares length, height, weight, capacity, and size.

Learning Standard 7C: Explore tools used for measurement.

7.C.ECa: With teacher assistance, explore the use of measuring tools that use standard units to measure objects and quantities that are meaningful to the child.

Learning Standard 8A: Explore objects and patterns.

8.A.ECa: Sort, order, compare and describe objects according to characteristics or attribute(s).

Learning Standard 9A:  Recognize, name, and match common shapes.

9.A.ECa: Recognize and name common two- and three-dimensional shapes and describe some of their attributes (e.g., number of sides, straight or curved lines).

9.A.ECb: Sort collections of two- and three-dimensional shapes by type (e.g., triangles, rectangles, circles, cubes, spheres, pyramids).

Learning Standard 9.B: Demonstrate an understanding of location and ordinal position, using appropriate vocabulary.

9.B.ECa Show understanding of location and ordinal position.

Learning Standard 19.A: Demonstrate physical competency and control of large and small muscles.

19.A.ECd: Use eye-hand coordination to perform tasks.

Learning Standard 31.B: Use communication and social skills to interact effectively with others.

31.B.ECa: Interact verbally and nonverbally with other children.

31.B.ECc: Use socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing, and taking turns.

31.C.ECa: Begin to share materials and experiences and take turns.

  1. Learning Objectives Associated with the Standards
  • Children will develop socio-emotional skills by sharing together in small groups.
  • Children will increase their attention span as they build together.
  • Children will develop knowledge of concepts such as length, height, weight and spatial areas.
  • Children will develop cognitive skills such as classifying; sorting by shape, size, color and weight; and counting.
  • Children will develop science process skills such as cause and effect (i.e. how high they can stack blocks before they fall), friction and gravity
  • Children will solve problems as they play (how can we build the tower higher).
  • Children will develop their fine and large muscles (by lifting, grasping, moving and carrying blocks).
  • Children will develop eye-hand coordination by putting blocks in specific orders or patterns.

      C.  Language Objectives:

Learning Standard 1.A: Demonstrate understanding through age-appropriate responses.

1.A.ECb: Respond appropriately to questions from others.

Learning Standard 1.B:Communicate effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.

1.B.ECa: Use language for a variety of purposes.

1.B.ECb: With teacher assistance, participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners (e.g., peers and adults in both small and large groups) about age-appropriate topics and texts.

1.B.ECc: Continue a conversation through two or more exchanges.

Learning Standard 1.E: Use increasingly complex phrases, sentences, and vocabulary.

1.E.ECb: Exhibit curiosity and interest in learning new words heard in conversations and books.

Key Vocabulary in Lesson:

The oral language used by people for in block area:

How many sides?       Can you add more?                       How tall is it?

How many do you have?       What else might he need?             How many can you do?

Content vocabulary (source for definitions http://www.wordcentral.com/home.html):

High: extending to a great distance upward

Short: having little length or height: not long or tall

Tall: having an unusually great height

Many: being one of a large but indefinite number

More: greater in amount, number, or size

 

D.  Prior Learning and Requisite Skills Needed for this Lesson

  • Children need to have an idea of idea shapes.
  • Children need to know what how to count to five.

E.  Instructional and Learning Tasks

I will introduce this center at the beginning of center time. I will explain to the children that I have included today foam block and a measuring tape in the block center on the wall and on the floor. One of the things they can do in this area is to see how tall they can build a tower against the wall. Then how long they can build one on the floor. I will be in this area to talk to them about which was easier and why. I will also be taking pictures of the children building to use in portfolios.

F.  Extension

In order to extend this area if I have time, I will add different types of blocks for the children to see which ones were easier to build with.

 

G.  Formal and Informal Assessment

I will observe and record students using pictures. To go into portfolios.

 

H.  Instructional Resources and Materials

For this area, I will need:

Measuring tape, a bare wall, foam blocks of different shapes and size

References

Jones, E., & Prescott, E. (2008, March/April). Dimensions of Children’s Caring and Learning

Environments [PDF]. Pasadena, CA: Pacific Oaks College. Retrieved May 31, 2018, from http://solr.bccampus.ca:8001/bcc/file/772052ba-de75-4597-87b9-1573a214021b/1 /ELC _121.zip/Module 3/Dimensions of Children’s Caring and Learning Environments.pdf

NAEYC. (n.d.). DAP with Preschoolers, Ages 3-5. Retrieved May 31, 2018, from

https://www.naeyc.org/resources/topics/dap/preschoolers

NICHE. (2018, April 26). Living in Earlville. Retrieved May 31, 2018, from

https://www.niche.com/places-to-live/earlville-lasalle-il/

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