Managing Health and Safety in Facilities Management

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FM4.05

Managing Health and Safety in own area of Facilities Management

1. Understanding the legal requirements for the management of health and safety and environment in the workplace 

1.1 Identify specific legislation, regulations, guidelines and codes of practice relating to health and safety and environment

There is a UK government body that is responsible for making sure all health and safety legislation are enforced. That body is called The Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The HSE plays a major role in producing advice on health and safety issues, and guidance on relevant legislation. They also conduct research into the effectiveness of regulations and other health and safety issues; consults with employers and employees representatives, and advises legislators and government on health and safety.

Health and Safety at Work Act 1974

This body is often referred to as HASAW or HSW, and is the main piece of UK health and safety legislation. It places a duty on all employers to have towards their employees “to ensure, as far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work” of all their employees and members of the public.

The ACT informs us the term ‘so far as is reasonably practicable’ implies an employer does not have to take measures to avoid or reduce the risk if they are technically impossible or if the time, trouble or cost of the measures would be grossly disproportionate to the risk.

What the law requires here is what good management and common sense would lead employers to do anyway: that is, to look at what the risks are and take sensible measures to tackle them.

Among its requirements are:

  • Safe operation and maintenance of the working environment, plant and systems
  • Maintenance of safe access and egress to the workplace
  • Safe use, handling and storage of dangerous substances
  • Adequate training of staff to ensure health and safety
  • Adequate welfare provisions for staff at work

Employers must also keep and revise a written record of health and safety policy and consult with employees or their representatives on such policies.

Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (the Management Regulations) places a duty on employers to assess and manage risks to their employees and others arising from work activities. This explores what employers are required to do to manage health and safety under the Health and Safety at Work Act.

The main requirement on employers is to carry out a risk assessment. Employers with five or more employees need to record the significant findings of the risk assessment.  Employers must also make arrangements to ensure the health and safety of the workplace, including making arrangements for emergencies, adequate information and training for employees, and for health surveillance where appropriate.

Employees must work safely in accordance with their training and instructions given to them. Employees must also notify the employer or the person responsible for health and safety of any serious or immediate danger to health and safety or any shortcoming in health and safety arrangements.

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995

Known as RIDDOR, these regulations require employers, the self-employed and people in control of premises, to report work-related deaths, major injuries, work-related diseases and dangerous occurrences.

Incidents can be reported:

Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992

These regulations are concerned with the working environment. They place a duty on employers to make sure that the workplace is safe and suitable for the tasks being carried out there, and that it does not present risks to employees and others.

The regulations cover all aspects of the working environment, including:

  • maintenance of the workplace, equipment, devices and systems
  • ventilation
  • temperature in indoor workplaces
  • lighting
  • cleanliness and waste materials
  • room dimensions and space
  • work stations and seating
  • condition of floors and traffic routes
  • falls or falling objects
  • windows and transparent or translucent doors, gates and walls
  • windows, skylights and ventilators
  • ability to clean windows, etc. safely
  • organisation, etc. of traffic routes
  • doors and gates
  • escalators and moving walkways
  • sanitary conveniences
  • washing facilities
  • drinking water
  • accommodation for clothing
  • facilities for changing clothing
  • facilities for rest and to eat meals.

Guidance

The main purposes of guidance are:

  • to interpret – helping people to understand what the law says including for example how requirements based on EC Directives fit with those under the Health and Safety at Work Act
  • to help people comply with the law
  • to give technical advise

Approved Codes of Practice

Approved Codes of Practice offer practical examples of good practice.  They give advice on how to comply with the law by, for example, providing a guide to what is ‘reasonably practicable’. For example, if regulations use words like ‘suitable and sufficient’, an Approved Code of Practice can illustrate what this requires in particular circumstances.  Approved Codes of Practice have a special legal status. If employers are prosecuted for a breach of health and safety law, and it is proved that they have not followed the relevant provisions of the Approved Code of Practice, a court can find them at fault unless they can show that they have complied with the law in some way.

1.2 Explain why health and safety in the workplace is important.

My Organisation acknowledges its legal responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and associated legislation and Codes of Practice, and gives its full commitment to doing everything practicable to protect the safety, health and welfare of all its employees, clients and any other persons whose health and safety may be affected by the Company’s business.

To this end, my Organisation ensures that its plan for the management of health and safety is communicated to all employees and volunteers and put into effect by management.

  • To provide and maintain equipment and systems of work that are safe and without risks to health
  • To ensure safety and the absence of risks to health in connection with the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances.
  • To provide such information, instruction, training and supervision as is necessary to ensure the health and safety at work of employees and volunteers.
  • To maintain all places of work under our control, including means of access and egress, in condition that is safe and without risk to health.
  • To provide and maintain a working environment that is safe and without risk to health, and to provide appropriate facilities for welfare.
  • To ensure the progressive identification and assessment of all risks, and their elimination or control.
  • To make arrangements for effective joint consultation with employees and volunteers on health and safety.
  • To comply with the statutory requirements as a minimum standard for health, safety and welfare of employees and volunteers at work, and all others, in particular our clients towards whom we have statutory obligations.
  • To ensure that effective arrangements exist to deal with any emergency.
  • To ensure that the responsibilities of management are assigned at all levels and their roles are defined.
  • To recognise the link between efficiency, safety and health, and to minimise the costs, losses and disruption which arise from accidents, ill-health and dangerous occurrences.
  • To ensure that employees and volunteers are aware that they are required to work safely and to co-operate with management in all matters that affect their health and safety at work.
  • To supply equipment that is safe to use.

1.3 Describe the minimum legal requirements for the management of health and safety.

Besides the Health and Safety at Work legislation Act itself, the following apply across the full range of workplace:

  • Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require employers to carry out risk assessments, make arrangements to implement necessary measures, appoint competent people and arrange for appropriate information and training
  • Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992: cover a wide range of basic health, safety and welfare issues such as ventilation, heating, lighting, workstations, seating and welfare facilities.
  • Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992: set out requirements for work with Visual Display Units (VDUs).
  • Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992: require employers to provide appropriate protective clothing and equipment for their employees.
  •  Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998: require that equipment provided for use at work, including machinery, is safe.
  • Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992: cover the moving of objects by hand or bodily force.
  • Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981: cover requirements for first aid.
  • The Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations 1989: require employers to display a poster telling employees what they need to know about health and safety.
  • Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969: require employers to take out insurance against accidents and ill health to their employees.
  •  Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR): require employers to notify certain occupational injuries, diseases and dangerous events.
  • Noise at Work Regulations 1989: require employers to take action to protect employees from hearing damage.
  • Electricity at Work Regulations 1989: require people in control of electrical systems to ensure they are safe to use and maintained in a safe condition.
  • Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH): require employers to assess the risks from hazardous substances and take appropriate precautions. In addition, specific regulations cover particular areas, for example asbestos and lead.
  • Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 2002: require suppliers to classify, label and package dangerous chemicals and provide safety data sheets for them.
  • Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994: cover safe systems of work on construction sites.
  • Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1994: cover safe installation, maintenance and use of gas systems and appliances in domestic and commercial premises.
  • Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999: require those who manufacture, store or transport dangerous chemicals or explosives in certain quantities to notify the relevant authority.
  • Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002: require employers and the self­employed to carry out a risk assessment of work activities involving dangerous substances.

1.4 Explain the roles and responsibilities as outlined in an organisation’s health and safety policy.

In my organisation’s Health and Safety Policy, there are the responsibilities of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), the Head of Operations and the responsibilities of all Employees and Volunteers.

The CEO has overall responsibilities for the organisation’s activities and practical responsibility for the health and safety management. He provides the final authority on matters concerning health and safety at work.

The CEO has the overall responsibility for ensuring that the health and safety policy is effectively implemented and that proper resources are made available in order to achieve this. He plans ahead as necessary to make human, financial and other resources available to secure a high standard of health and safety management, taking competent advice on matters of health and safety where relevant.

The CEO has the specific responsibility for co-ordinating the management of health and safety and ensures that the Health and Safety Policy is reviewed annually and, if necessary, revised. He makes decisions on health and safety issues based on a proper assessment of any risks to health and safety, and will ensure the control of those risks in an appropriate manner.

The CEO also has the responsibility for the following matters which may be delegated to the Head of Operations or other competent employees and/or volunteers:

  • The arrangements for emergencies, including the fire precautions and emergency evacuation plans
  • The ongoing maintenance and testing and associated records for the building services and equipment, e.g. heating, electricity, gas, fire equipment and the specific work based equipment
  • Liaison with contractors to ensure health and safety in respect of their activities on site
  • Risk assessment or working with external health and safety consultants to achieve risk assessment, and maintaining the records of assessments
  • The co-operation of first aid arrangements and accident recording and reporting, including compliance with the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995

The Head of Operations is responsible for health and safety supervision and safe systems of work on a day-to-day basis plus specific tasks delegated by the CEO, some tasks may be further delegated to responsible employees, but the Head of Operations has the overall responsibility, and these may include the following:

  • Providing trained first aid services and looking after first aid equipment
  • Carrying out and recording the weekly test of the fire alarm call points
  • Carrying out checks of the fire access routes, fire doors, extinguishers in place and checking for fire hazards
  • Checking emergency lights
  • Acting as Fire Warden
  • Carrying out and recording regular machinery and plant safety inspections
  • Ensuring that machinery and equipment is maintained and serviced appropriately
  • Ensuring that general health and safety training and guidance is given to all employees and volunteers
  • Supervising the workplace to ensure safety procedures are followed at all times

Responsibilities of all Employees and Volunteers – the law make it a duty of everyone at work to take reasonable care for their own health and safety and that of others and employees’ and volunteers’ duties include:

  • Co-operation with management to ensure that safe and healthy working practises and workplace are maintained
  • Reporting promptly to the Head of Operations or CEO any hazardous situation or defect
  • Making full and proper use of any safety equipment, and keeping such equipment in a clean condition and in good order
  • Following any instructions  and training given in respect of any activity involving risk o health and safety
  • Acting responsibly and refraining from reckless behaviour at work
  • Co-operating with the Organisation in the implementation and observation of all statutory requirements placed upon the Organisation

1.5 Produce a report which outlines compliance with issues within own area of responsibility.

This is an executive summary of the full report within my own area of responsibility in my organisation’s 2016 Fire Risk assessment report. The objective of the Fire Risk Assessment was to evaluate the existing fire safety arrangements for the premises and to make recommendations for improvement.

The overall fire risk rating for the church has been assessed as MEDIUM. There are recommended actions to address for some areas of the premises to ensure the fire risk within the premises is suitably managed.

(See appendix I.5)

2. Understand personal responsibilities for health and safety in the workplace  

2.1 Explain an individual’s responsibilities and liabilities under health and safety legislation.

The law make it a duty of everyone at work to take reasonable care for their own health and safety and that of others and employees’ and volunteers’ duties include:

The CEO has overall responsibilities for the organisation’s activities and practical responsibility for the health and safety management. He provides the final authority on matters concerning health and safety at work.

The CEO has the overall responsibility for ensuring that the health and safety policy is effectively implemented and that proper resources are made available in order to achieve this. He plans ahead as necessary to make human, financial and other resources available to secure a high standard of health and safety management, taking competent advice on matters of health and safety where relevant.

The CEO has the specific responsibility for co-ordinating the management of health and safety and ensures that the Health and Safety Policy is reviewed annually and, if necessary, revised. He makes decisions on health and safety issues based on a proper assessment of any risks to health and safety, and will ensure the control of those risks in an appropriate manner.

The CEO also has the responsibility for the following matters which may be delegated to the Head of Operations or other competent employees and/or volunteers:

  • The arrangements for emergencies, including the fire precautions and emergency evacuation plans
  • The ongoing maintenance and testing and associated records for the building services and equipment, e.g. heating, electricity, gas, fire equipment and the specific work based equipment
  • Liaison with contractors to ensure health and safety in respect of their activities on site
  • Risk assessment or working with external health and safety consultants to achieve risk assessment, and maintaining the records of assessments
  • The co-operation of first aid arrangements and accident recording and reporting, including compliance with the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995

2.2 Explain the resources required and ways of providing health and safety information, induction and training for a team.

The Organisation recognises that people are a vital resource and priority will be given to the effective control of risks, in doing so, the support of all employees and volunteers is needed in avoiding accidents and ill health and the associated cost and disruption.

It also recognises the importance of suitable and effective induction training in the development and safety of their employees. The CEO working in consultation with the Head of Operations organises an induction procedure for staff that is appropriate to their working needs.

A record is kept of all training in health and safety matters undertaken by employees and volunteers whether external or internal

The Head of Operations will inform the CEO of any revealed training needs, and where necessary, external advice or training will be secured.

Induction training will take the following format:

  • The Organisation’s statement of Health and Safety and Safety Policy and the individual responsibilities of all concerned.
  • Procedures for the reporting of hazards and near misses.
  • Details of hazards specific to the task, e.g. Machinery safety, Manual Handling, Display screen equipment.
  • Procedures to follow in the event of a fire: means of escape, assembly areas and the use of fire extinguishers.
  • Current first aid arrangements
  • Sources of health and safety information available
  • Correct use of personal protective equipment where provided

If an employee requires specialist training, the Head of Operations or CEO undertakes the training of employees and volunteers in health and safety matters necessary to their work. They ensure that adequate information is available, using suppliers’ information or advice and government publications are necessary.

2.3 Explain how and when to consult with other people on health and safety issues within own area of responsibility

Employers have a duty to consult with their employees, or their representatives, on health and safety issues. It is necessary as it informs and ensures employers are complying with health and safety laws. In my organisation, employees and volunteers are consulted in good time about matters relating to their health and safety at work. Those matters include:

  • Any measures at the workplace which may substantially affect their health and safety
  • Arrangements for competent persons nominated for the purposes of health and safety management or emergency procedures
  • Information about risks to health and safety
  • The planning and organising of any health and safety training
  • The health and safety consequences for them of any new technology planned to be introduced to the workplace

Consultation within one’s own area of responsibility involves not only giving information to the employees but also listening to them and taking account of what they say before making any health and safety decisions. The law sets out how employees must be consulted in different situations and the different choices employers have to make. There are two different regulations that require employers to consult their workforce about health and safety:

  • the Safety Representatives and Safety Committees Regulations 1977 (as amended); and
  • the Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 (as amended).

In workplaces where the employer recognises trade unions and trade unions are recognised for collective bargaining purposes, the Safety Representatives and Safety Committees Regulations 1977 (as amended) will apply. In workplaces, as in my organisation, where employees are not in a trade union and/or the employer does not recognise the trade union, or the trade union does not represent those employees not in the trade union, the Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 (as amended) will apply.

However, depending on the circumstances within one’s own workplace, they may have to consult under one set of regulations, or if they have an already existing consultation arrangement that satisfy health and safety laws, there might not be any requirement to change them, as long as those requirements are reviewed on a regular basis.

2.4 Explain why and how health and safety should inform planning and decision making

The Church acknowledges its legal responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and associated legislation and Codes of Practice, and therefore gives its full commitment to doing everything practicable to protect the safety, health and welfare of all its employees, clients and any other persons whose health and safety may be affected by the Company’s business.

To this end, the Church ensures that there is a committee to spearhead the plan; a committee that meets a few times and constantly discuss health and safety issues.

  • Appoints a committee that makes decisions
  • Highlights what actions are needed, if any
  • Records the actions
  • Recommends the agreed action, and reviews the action at a later date.

Health and Safety informs planning and decision making in so many ways:

  • increased productivity – businesses with good workforce involvement in health and safety tend to have a better productivity rate;
  •  improvements in overall efficiency and quality;
  •  higher levels of workforce motivation. Consulting employees about health and safety can result in:
  •  a healthier and safer workplace – employees can help to identify hazards, assess risks and develop ways to control or remove risks;
  •  better decisions about health and safety – these could be based on the input and experience of a range of people, including employees who have extensive knowledge about their own job and the business;
  •  a stronger commitment to implementing decisions or actions – as employees have been actively involved in reaching these decisions;
  •  greater co-operation and trust – employers and employees who talk to each other and listen to each other, gain a better understanding of each other’s views;

2.5 Explain ways of providing health and safety information, induction and training for team in own area of facilities management responsibility.

A record is kept of all training in health and safety matters undertaken by the facilities team.

The Head of Facilities informs the team on any relevant training needs, and where necessary, external advice or training is also secured.

Health and Safety Induction training for the Facilities team usually will take the format illustrated below:

  • The Church’s statement of Health and Safety and Safety Policy and the individual responsibilities of all concerned.
  • Procedures for the reporting of hazards and near misses.
  • Details of hazards specific to the task, e.g. Machinery safety, Manual Handling, loose electrical wirings, fire exit blocks.
  • Procedures to follow in the event of a fire; means of escape, assembly areas and the use of fire extinguishers.
  • Current first aid arrangements.
  • Sources of health and safety information available.
  • Correct use of personal protective equipment where provided.

In my Facilities management team, we provide our team with the information necessary to enable them fulfil their functions. The Information includes any risks arising from employee work activities, the measures in place or proposals to control these risks, and what they should do if they are exposed to a risk, including emergency procedures. We already have the relevant information needed for our team as part of our health and safety management system, such as copies of risk assessments or accident records.

 

 

 

3. Understand how to communicate and record workplace health and safety hazards and risk assessments

3.1 Explain how to communicate the written health and safety policy statement to people who work in own area of responsibility and other relevant parties

My Organisation acknowledges its legal responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and associated legislation and Codes of Practice, and gives its full commitment to doing everything practicable to protect the safety, health and welfare of all its employees, clients and any other persons whose health and safety may be affected by the Company’s business.

To this end, the Organisation will ensure that its plan for the management of health and safety is communicated to all employees and volunteers and put into effect by management.

The Organisation recognises that people are a vital resource and priority will be given to the effective control of risks, in doing so, the support of all employees and volunteers is needed in avoiding accidents and ill health and the associated cost and disruption.

All employees and volunteers are reminded of their persona; legal responsibilities and asked to do everything they can to prevent injury to themselves and to others, and for our part, the Organisation will provide all necessary training, information and instruction to all our employees and volunteers.

Adequate financial, human and other resources will be made available to ensure the effective implementation of this policy, and proper monitoring procedures will be established to monitor health and safety performance and ensure good communication and co-ordination.

3.2 Explain how to develop a culture which puts health and safety first, within own area of facilities management responsibility

The Church recognises that an effective culture that puts health and safety first is a culture where everyone is trained regularly and monitoring put in place.

We monitor the way the church’s health and safety is managed, and make sure the plans put in place are implemented. The training will take the format illustrated below:

  • The Church’s statement of Health and Safety and Safety Policy and the individuals responsibilities of all concerned
  • Procedures for the reporting of hazards and near misses
  • Details of hazards specific to the task, e.g. Machinery safety, Manual Handling, Display screen equipment
  • Procedures to follow in the event of a fire; means of escape, assembly areas and the use of fire extinguishers
  • Sources of health and safety information available.

Monitoring will be done in a systematic way, in accordance with a plan co-ordinated by the CEO, the Head of Operations and the committee. The purpose of the monitoring will be to review regularly the arrangements in place for the management of health and safety, in order to determine whether they are adequate and effective and whether further measures are required in order to meet a proper level of health and safety management

3.3 Explain how the risk assessment record should be communicated to ensure control measures are implemented in the workplace

There are legal duties and obligations around Risk Assessment

The Management of Health and Safety at Work (MHSW) Regulations 1999 require all employers and the self-employed to assess the risks from their work on anyone who may be affected by their activities.

The Regulations require employers to carry out a systematic examination of their work activities and record the significant findings of the Assessment. If an employer has five or more employees, the findings must be recorded in writing.

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 places a duty on employers to assess and manage risks to their employees and others arising from work activities.

Employers must also make arrangements to ensure the health and safety of the workplace, including making arrangements for emergencies, adequate information and training for employees and for health surveillance where appropriate.

Employees must work safely in accordance with their training and instructions given to them. Employees must also notify the employer or the person responsible for health and safety of any serious or immediate danger to health and safety or any shortcoming in health and safety arrangements.

As well as the assessment of general work activities, there are a number of pieces of legislation that look for a specific Risk Assessment including:

  • Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002
  • The Manual Handling Operations Regulations
  • The Control Of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2002
  • The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992
  • The Display Screen Equipment Regulations

 

4. Understand the five step process for risk assessment 

4.1 Describe the five steps of carrying out a risk assessment

There are no hard and fast rules as to how Risk Assessments should be carried out, as every organisation is different and may require a slightly different approach. It’s important that Risk Assessments are carried out systematically and all of the foreseeable risks considered.

In order to assess risks it is important to be aware of the distinction between hazard and risk.

The following definitions are usually applied to these terms:

  • Hazard: Anything with the potential to cause harm, electricity, hazardous substances and noise are examples of typical hazards.
  • Risk: The likelihood that damage, loss or injury will be caused by a hazard and how severe the outcome may be.

The Health and Safety Executive recommend an approach where we carry out the process in five steps:

  • identify the hazards associated with work activities
  • identify who could be harmed by those hazards
  • identify how you manage the risks at present and what further steps might be required to reduce the risks further. These are your control measures.
  • record the findings of your assessment and inform those at risk of the controls
  • review the risk assessment on a regular basis, e.g. if the staff, the activity, or the equipment used change.

In my organisation, we have a plan in place where we review our assessments at least annually. We look at each activity as critically as possible, observing how it is carried out, and checking the existing guidelines and information.

We also check accident reports and inspection and maintenance records to see if anything can be learned from existing records.

4.2 Undertake a risk assessment of health and safety hazards in own workplace

 

(See appendix 4.2a & 4.2b)

4.3 Select effective elimination or control methods and explain how they meet legal requirements and sector standards

The Control measures / methods adopted and how they meet legal requirements are as follows:

Controlling risks

When deciding on control measures the following principles are applied:

  • can the risk be avoided or eliminated?
  • can the risks be contained at source?
  • can the work be adapted to suit the individual? e.g. layout of workplace, choice of equipment and methods of working
  • can engineering or technical controls be used?

Information, instruction and training, and providing personal protective equipment should always be considered as a last resort after the above controls have been considered.

Employers should, wherever possible, give priority to those controls that best protect everyone exposed to the risk.

Additional controls may be required to protect vulnerable groups, such as young people or pregnant workers.

The control methods used in different areas may include:

 ELECTRICAL

  • Portable appliance testing is carried out in line with HSE guidance
  • Fixed wiring to be frequently physically inspected at least once every month to make sure no wires are exposed or people at risk.

WORKING ENVIRONMENT

  • Ventilation, heating, and cooling are well controlled
  • Lighting is suitable and adequate for the activities carried out
  • Noise is not a hazard in this environment

WORKPLACE

  • Carpets are generally in good condition
  • Spillages cleaned up to minimise slipping risks
  • Cleaning operations take place outside work periods
  • Trailing cables are generally avoided
  • Access routes are kept away
  • All the facilities are kept in a clean state
  • Light fittings are changed by contractors so staff do not work at height
  • Doors have vision panels

WORK EQUIPMENT

  • Photocopiers and other office equipment in good condition and with clearly indicated areas where user adjustments may be safely made
  • General display screen equipment / workstations appear suitable, with flat screens, adjustable chairs, good lighting

DSE assessments are completed by all users

5. Understand how to monitor and review workplace health and safety policies and systems.

5.1 Explain how and when to review the written health and safety policy statement

In my organisation, we look at each activity as critically as possible, observing how it is carried out, and checking existing guidelines and information.

We check accident reports and inspection and maintenance records to see if anything can be learned from existing records.

The Policy must be brought to the attention of those who might be affected by it; the employees, sub contractors and volunteers. If there are roles/functions that are delegated responsibility for certain things within our Policy we make sure that those people are aware of what they are responsible for. We also make copies available to all new starters and also put a copy on the notice board.

We must review the Policy at least annually or more often if something changes that could affect people.

We know the Policy is a legal document; therefore, we only include things that we will actually do. For example we don’t say you will carry out monthly inspections if we only do them every 3 months; if something goes wrong and an HSE inspector looks at our policy and asks to see the monthly inspection reports we will raise their suspicions about other things that we probably haven’t done.

5.2 Explain how to establish systems for monitoring, measuring and reporting on health and safety performance within own area of responsibility

My Organisation has a clear commitment to monitor the way health and safety is managed.

Monitoring is carried out in a systematic way, in accordance with a plan co-ordinated by the CEO and Head of Operations.

The purpose of monitoring is to review regularly the arrangements in place for the management of health and safety, in order to determine whether they are adequate and effective and whether further measures are required in order to meet a proper level of health and safety and safety management.

The monitoring plan will normally encompass the following:

  • Weekly and daily checks carried out by the Head of Operations and reported to the CEO
  • Any accident and incident records will be reviewed by the CEO on a regular basis
  • Risk assessments will be reviewed annually or when the risks are known to have changed

5.3 Explain how to keep up-to-date with health and safety risks, issues and developments which affect own industry or sector.

Training is vital; all appointed safety representatives must constantly undergo training in their areas of function. We must ensure that elected representatives receive the training they need to carry out their roles, as is reasonable in the circumstances.

Planning also is the key to ensuring our health and safety arrangements work. It helps us think through the actions we have set out in our policy and work out how they will happen in practice. We consider:

  • what we want to achieve, i.e. how we will ensure that our employees and others are kept healthy and safe at work
  • how we will decide what might cause harm to people and whether we are doing enough or need to do more to prevent that harm
  • how we will prioritise the improvements we may need to make
  • who will be responsible for health and safety tasks, what they should do, when and with what results
  • how we will measure and review whether we have achieved what we set out to do

Planning is essential for the implementation of health and safety policies. Adequate control of risk can only be achieved through co-ordinated action by all members of the organisation. An effective system for health and safety management requires organisations to plan to:

  • control risks
  • react to changing demands
  • sustain positive health and safety attitudes and behaviours

Overall word count: 5,986

 

 

APPENDIX

JESUS HOUSE

Health & Safety Risk Assessment

 

Assessment carried out by:

 

 

Okey Nkere

Facilities Officer

Risk Assessment

 

RA1
Date of Assessment

 

 

 

 

27 June 2014

17th August 2015 Reviewed and amended

12th Sept. 2016 Reviewed and amended

Area assessed

 

Offices/admin. 1st floor. nursery
Subject of assessment

 

 

General Risks e.g. machinery, electrical,

general working environment.

 

Details of workplace/activity
This assessment will consider the risks associated with the offices used by employees and volunteers on the first floor. This also includes the ministries office and the nursery.
Hazards and Risks
1. ELECTRICAL

  • Shock, burns, fire
  • Damage to cables underneath desks from feet

2. WORKING ENVIRONMENT

  • Ventilation, heating and cooling, if inadequate can lead to discomfort and stress
  • Lighting, if not suitable and sufficient, can lead to eye strain, headaches, accidents
  • Noise is not a hazard in this environment

 

3. WORKPLACE

  • Tripping over any trailing cables, damaged carpeting, damaged floor-boxes etc
  • Any obstructed access routes
  • Lack of cleanliness, particularly of washing facilities and kitchens, could give rise to disease/ infection
  • Glazing panels being clear and potentially hazardous
  • Access to light fittings/falls from height
  • Risks of injury by doors opening, particularly if carrying hot drinks etc.

 

4. WORK EQUIPMENT

  • Display screen equipment if not ergonomically set up, is associated with musculoskeletal  problems, headaches, eyestrain
  • Equipment such as photocopiers could injure if misused

(Appendix 4.2a)

 

JESUS HOUSE

Health & Safety Risk Assessment

 

Assessment carried out by:

 

 

Okey Nkere

Facilities Officer

Risk Assessment

 

RA2
Date of Assessment

 

 

 

 

27 June 2014

17th August 2015 Reviewed and amended

12th Sept.2016 Reviewed and amended

Area assessed

 

Reception area, ground floor.
Subject of assessment

 

 

General Risks e.g. machinery, electrical,

general working environment.

 

Details of workplace/activity
The reception area comprises a reception desk and foyer which is manned by a security guard.
Hazards and Risks
 

1. ELECTRICAL

  • Shock, burns, fire

2. WORKING ENVIRONMENT

  • Ventilation, heating and cooling, if inadequate can lead to discomfort and stress
  • Lighting, if not suitable and sufficient, can lead to eye strain, headaches, accidents

 

3. WORKPLACE

  • Tripping over any trailing cables, damaged carpeting, damaged floor-boxes etc
  • Any obstructed access routes

 

4. INTRUDER/UNWANTED GUEST

  • Risk of physical assault or injury from an unwanted guest.
Persons at risk
 

Employees, volunteers, visitors, contractors

Control measures in place / available
 

1. ELECTRICAL

  • Portable appliance testing is carried out in line with HSE guidance
  • Fixed wiring was inspected in June 2014

 

2. WORKING ENVIRONMENT

  • Ventilation, heating, and cooling are well controlled
  • Lighting is suitable and adequate for the activities carried out

 

3. WORPLACE

  • Carpets are generally in good condition
  • Spillages cleaned up to minimise slipping risks
  • Cleaning operations take place outside work periods
  • Trailing cables are generally avoided
  • Access routes are kept away

4. INTRUDER / UNWANTED GUEST

  • There is a security guard present at reception 24/7
  • CCTV is in operation
  • There is a signing in procedure and passes are issued
  • Unidentified persons present in the building are challenged, visitors are issued with passes

 

Overall assessment of risk
 

ELECTRICAL

The overall risk is MEDIUM. See recommended control measures

WORK ENVIRONMENT

The overall risk is LOW. Good controls are in place

WORKPLACE

The overall risk is LOW. Good controls are in place.

INTRUDER / UNWANTED GUEST

The overall risk is LOW. Good controls are in place.

Further control measures recommended
 

ELECTRICAL

Complete the outstanding actions from the fixed wiring inspection, if not done already.

The priority for action is HIGH

 

Action completed by:

 

Okey Nkere
Signature

 

 
Date

 

 
Proposed review date

 

June 2017

(Appendix 4.2b)

(Appendix 1.5)

                          FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT

                                 ACTION PLAN

 

The plan collates all of the recommendations derived from the fire risk assessment. The organisation uses this plan to ensure all recommended actions are noted, dated when completed and highlighted if they are not acted upon. The action plan includes the date, which the consultant has included should be attributed to a recommendation relating to the action priority level. The fire risk assessment is reviewed annually or sooner if there is a significant change.

Action

Priority

Level

 

 

                                        Recommendation

 

    Target

    Date For

  Completion

 

   Person

  Responsible

 

     Date

  Completed

HIGH

 

It is recommended that copies of the emergency evacuation plan are widely displayed throughout the premises July 2017 Okey Nkere Feb. 2017
HIGH

 

Complete any remaining actions from the fixed wiring test in June 2015, if outstanding July 2017 Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
HIGH

 

The 5 exits currently available within the main hall (auditorium) are sufficient for the number of churchgoers (congregation) present on any given weekend (1200). During special events this number may exceed this. Based on calculations for the number of people that should occupy the auditorium, there should be no more than 900 people present at one time. Ongoing Okey Nkere  
HIGH The company should train employees to keep fire doors closed at all times especially those protecting escape routes

Repair or replace self-closers in the following areas;

  • Fire door leading to office on west Wing

It is recommended that areas within the premises with compromised

 

                         Recommendation

August 2017 Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
  compartmentation are suitably repaired. The areas noted to have compromised compartmentation at the time of the assessment were:

  • Ministries room, electrical riser cupboards, compartmentation break. Missing ceiling tile in Ministries room creates uninterrupted break from electrical riser cupboard into ministries room
  • Plant room 1
  • IT communications room
  • Electrical riser cupboard, ground floor
  • ‘Hephzibah Room,’ ground floor. The vent on the fire door leading into this room compromises compartmentation
  • Nursery Kitchen – incomplete fire break on partition wall dividing kitchen nursery and children’s play area
     
HIGH Compartmentation breaks resulting from service wiring g travelling through walls should be suitably filled with a suitable fire retardant material.

It is recommended that fire doors fitted with vents should be suitably replaced or the suitable intumescent vents fitted, if not done already.

August 2017 Okey Nkere Feb. 2017
HIGH Ensure that the emergency lighting at the main entrance is suitably repaired. Also ensure the emergency lighting in the electrical riser room on the ground floor adjacent to the facilities room is functioning properly. It is recommended that all other emergency lights within the premises are checked to ensure they are working adequately. June 2017 Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
Action

Priority

Level

 

 

                                        Recommendation

 

    Target

    Date For

  Completion

 

   Person

  Responsible

 

     Date

  Completed

HIGH It is recommended that automated fire detection is installed in the following areas where fires may go unnoticed;

  • “Word Mill” room in reception area – ground floor
  • Facilities Office – Ground floor
  • Radio studio – Ground floor
August 2016 Okey Nkere Feb. 2017
MEDIUM Keep lighting under the stage in the auditorium turned off so as to avoid over heating July 2017 Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
MEDIUM In order to reduce the fire loading within the premises, it is recommended that all redundant combustible materials are removed from the following area and suitably disposed of;

  • Boiler room (1st floor)
August 2017 Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
MEDIUM Ensure that a suitable number of Fire Action Notices are provided around the premises. These should be located close to fire alarm call points and provide information on raising the alarm and evacuating the premises in the event of an emergency September

2017

Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
MEDIUM The following is recommended;

  • Extension leads should be no longer than 15 metres
  • Always check that leads plugs and sockets are undamaged
August 2017 Okey Nkere Feb. 2017
MEDIUM The call point in the comms unit of the Worship Centre requires repairing August 2017 Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
Action

Priority

Level

 

 

                                        Recommendation

 

    Target

    Date For

  Completion

 

   Person

  Responsible

 

     Date

  Completed

LOW  i.e. Foam extinguisher label at bottom of stairwell. July 2017 Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
LOW Ideally, all call points would have appropriate signage over them July 2017 Okey Nkere Jan. 2017
LOW Ensure that all appropriate extinguishers are in place and suitably positioned within the premises. Large 9kg fire extinguishers e.g. water should be hung no higher than 1 metre from the ground or placed on a suitable stand. Smaller 4kg extinguishers should be hung no higher than 1.5 metres from the ground or placed on a suitable stand.

Ensure that all other fire extinguisher points are suitably labelled, this includes removing labels / signs where there are no associated fire extinguishers in place

July 2017 Okey Nkere Feb. 2017
LOW Fire extinguishing media must be serviced annually. This is due and should be suitably arranged. June 2017 Okey Nkere March 2017

References and Bibliography for FM4:05

 

1. http://www.healthyworkinglives.com/advice/Legislation-and-          policy/Workplace-Health-and-Safety/health-safety-legislation Assessed 12th Dec.

2.  http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/hsc13.pdf Assessed 12th Dec.

3. http://www.healthyworkinglives.com/advice/Legislation-and-policy/Workplace-Health-and-Safety/risk-assessment#involving Assessed 6th Jan.

4. https://www.hsdirect.co.uk/free-info/how-to-write-a-safety-policy.html Assessed 5th March

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