Strategies for Dealing with Challenging Behaviour

9101 words (36 pages) Assignment in Assignments

06/06/19 Assignments Reference this

Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work produced by our Assignment Writing Service. You can view samples of our professional work here.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays.

Staff handbook

Strategies for dealing with challenging behaviour

Positive behaviour management– Positive behavioural support is a person-centred approach to people who show or at risk of showing behaviours which are challenging. It involves understanding reasons why an individual may be showing certain challenging behaviours and considering the person which includes their life history, physical needs, emotional needs and any other factors which can have an impact on their behaviour. PBM involves assessing broad social and physical context in which the behaviour occurs and planning and implementing ways of supporting and assisting the person to ensure that their behaviour is improved and to enhance the quality of life for themselves and those around them. An example of this can be that staff in any profession such as teachers may choose to react to challenging behaviour with praise. This encourages the individuals to focus on the good and positive aspects of their behaviour which they may then be more likely to repeat to receive more praise and admiration. As a carer I have the responsibility of ensuring my residents are kept safe and protected so because my resident who suffers from Alzheimer’s has begun in engaging in behaviour which is harmful and self-destructive I would use positive behaviour management as a way of dealing with this. This would include thoroughly assessing the factors which could be impacting my resident which therefore makes them hurt themselves as a result, this can be something which has happened to them in the care home or something which happened in the past which is the reason behind it. As my resident suffers from Alzheimer’s disease, this has many symptoms such as confusion, personality changing such as becoming more aggressive, hallucinations so seeing and hearing things that aren’t there and being delusional so they believe things that aren’t true as well as low mood or anxiety. All these symptoms can be factors impacting my resident which causes them to therefore harm themselves. This could be out of frustration of not being able to express themselves properly. This strategy is effective when dealing with my resident who’s engaging in self-destructive and harmful behaviour. This is because, positive behaviour management involves thoroughly understand why an individual may be showing certain behaviours or actions, this is useful as by knowing what may be impacting them, you can focus on vital needs they may have to help encourage them to stop engaging in such behaviour. Also, by understanding, it may also encourage the resident to therefore feel comfortable and confident in me as their carer as they will know that my job is to help and protect them. This can then better my relationship with the resident and I can ensure that my resident understands engaging in self-destructive behaviour is dangerous and makes things worse. However, this strategy may not be useful when dealing with my resident. This is because, my resident may not wish to cooperate with me which makes it more difficult to understand why my resident may be engaging in self-destructive behaviour. This strategy would then be ineffective as if I don’t understand what my resident is going through I won’t be certain as to what methods can be used to support and assist the resident. It may also be ineffective as my resident may choose to keep personal things private such as pervious traumas, family history, emotional needs etc which means the help I provide my resident with may not be the help they require, which therefore means it’s a waste of money and time as it may not positively impact my resident due to them not needing it. ”

Person-centred planning- This provides a way of helping an individual plan all aspects of their life to ensure that the individual remains central to the creation of any plan that will affect them to make sure that their needs are properly met and to ensure that they aren’t getting care they don’t require or want. Person centred planning is about making changes in a person’s life and planning for the future to make sure that their future is bright and is properly planned. PCB ensures that the individual stays in control of their life, the plans made, who is involved in them, whose help they will need to make the plans happen as well as many other things. Those managing an individual’s planning will need to ensure that it is revisited often as an individual’s plan can change and vary naturally overtime. Person-centred planning can have many positives effects on an individual for instance: this may help improve their social skills, having a positive mind-set, help with budgeting, pursuing personal interests, being comfortable in social environments and many more. As a carer I would use person-centred planning as a way of dealing with my resident harming themselves and engaging in self-destructive behaviour. I would ensure that I regularly updated my residents planning as individual’s future plans can change overtime, by doing this my resident will also feel respected as it conveys that I care for their future and their life does have a value. By focusing on the resident and solely what they want and need, this ensures that their requirements are met and fulfilled so that they do not have to worry about this. By having less stress and less things to worry about, my resident may feel a lot more relaxed and confident, therefore they may then stop harming themselves as a result. An example of this can be: setting up a timetable of different activities to help keep my resident fit and healthy, this can include different activities everyday such as yoga, Zumba, swimming and many more. This can be person-centred planning as exercise may be what my resident needs to be healthier. This therefore may keep my residents mental and emotional health well, as exercise may relieve stress and worries. This strategy can be effective for many reasons, one being that focusing on my resident’s needs and requirements means that my resident is not getting help they don’t require so then money and time won’t be wasted. Person-centred planning consists of focusing solely on what my resident requires to maintain a healthy physical, emotional and mental well-being. For example, to improve my residents mental state, as a carer I would ensure that I am aware of any of their thoughts and what they want to do to ensure that they are still in control of their life and their decision. For instance, setting up a fixed day where my resident can see their friends and family, whether it’s within the care home or elsewhere, this is effective as it can encourage my resident to stop engaging in self-destructive behaviour as by seeing their family and friends regularly can ensure that they are content. However, this strategy isn’t effective as this strategy requires good communications skills and as my resident suffers from Alzheimer’s it can mean that my resident has communication problems. There may then be a speech barrier which makes this strategy ineffective. This is because my resident may not be able to express any worries and opinions they have which can make it difficult to plan for my resident’s future as I may not be sure whether my resident is happy with these plans or not.

Effective communication-Effective communication is about understanding emotion and the intention behind the information and data. For communication to be effective, you need to be able to clearly convey a message and be able to listen to what is being said and makes the other individual feel heard and understood. Effective communication can include using words which everyone can properly understand, in a suitable tone of voice and body language and considering the context of communication improves its effectiveness. Effective communication combines a set of 4 skills: engaged listening, nonverbal communication, managing stress and asserting yourself in a respectful way. An example of effective communication can be that in a school, a teacher may use effective communication when speaking to parents about their child’s progress. They will use words that can be understood, use a suitable tone of voice and have a straight posture in order to be formal and professional. To care for my resident, I would use effective communication to properly get my point across. By having effective communication, this can ensure that communication between my resident and I are clear and effective, this way we can both understand each other’s point of view and make sure that there are is no confusion or miscommunication. This may be useful to care for my resident as by having clear conversations where we understand each other, I can ensure that my resident isn’t stressed or worried due to not understanding me. This may then mean that my resident won’t resort to self-destructive behaviour as a way of dealing with this due to their frustration. However, if I did not use effective communication it could mean that my client is frustrated and irritated due to not understanding me well, this can lead to my resident becoming stressed trying to understand what I meant which can lead to them harming themselves as a way of coping with the tension and the confusion. This strategy is effective as having effective communication ensures that there is no confusion between my resident and I, this is useful as there won’t be any confusion or miscommunication. Not understanding each other can lead to my resident being confused and stressed. Therefore, as there is no miscommunication, my resident will thoroughly understand me and will be able to reply back to what I say properly. Another reason why it is effective is because having effective communication between my resident and I makes sure that my resident is confident and comfortable with speaking to me about their issues or any worries they have. This can then encourage them to stop any challenging behaviour. However, effective communication may be ineffective too. This is because, effective communication could be seen as over explaining certain things to ensure that they thoroughly understand the point I am trying to make. This is ineffective as this could confuse my resident further which is a problem as they may then misunderstand my points due to over thinking it. This means that effective communication may not be a two way thing, I may believe that I am using correct and effective communication but my resident may disagree. Also, my resident has Alzheimer’s which has symptoms of words with speaking and writing and memory loss. This may be ineffective due to these symptoms as everything I say to my resident, they may not be aware of it as they may forget it which means they won’t thoroughly understand me which then makes communication difficult. As my resident also may struggle with communication due to this disease, communication may be hard as I may not understand what my resident is trying to say or my resident may be unsure as to how to communicate certain points which can cause frustration leading to my resident engaging in self-destructive behaviour as a coping mechanism.

Appropriate body language-Body language is a type of non-verbal communication in which physical behaviour, as opposed to words, are used to express or convey information. Body language includes facial expressions, body posture, gestures, eye movement, touch and the use of space. Using correct and appropriate body language may mean information is properly communicated so that it’s understood successfully. An example of body language can be that someone who is feeling down and miserable may have a frown on their face, may be slouching and may also have their face in their hands. From this, those around the individual which understand and knowledge that they may feeling sad or down. Another example can be that staff in hospitals, schools, care homes and many more may make eye contact and have a straight posture to show the individuals they are listening, paying attention and understanding what the individual is saying. To care for my resident, I would use appropriate body language to convey that I am listening to my resident and paying attention as showing them that I am listening to what they must say may encourage them to stop with the self-destructive behaviour. My resident may do this due to the feeling that they aren’t listened to or paid attention to. When an individual is pushed to the side and their opinions and feelings are disregarded, they may become frustrated so these negative feelings can lead to wanting to carry out self-destructive and harmful acts. This strategy is effective because it ensures that there is good communication between my resident and I, this is useful as having good communication ensures that we don’t misunderstand any points made. It also makes sure that my resident feels respected and feels as though they aren’t a burden to me. As a carer, I would need to ensure that I have a correct posture to ensure that my resident knows that I am listening to what she has to say and any opinions or worries. For instance, when my resident is speaking to me I would need to make sure to have a straight posture and not slouch, also ensure that my arms aren’t crossed or leaning on my cheek, this can make my resident believe I am not interested or I am getting bored. Appropriate body language is useful in encouraging my resident to stop engaging in self-destructive behaviour this is because my resident will see that I’m worried about her and do care for her. However, appropriate body language may not be effective and this is because not all individuals understand body language properly, this can then cause misunderstanding and cause both staff and residents to get a wrong message. It is also ineffective as the resident may be paying attention to what I have to say so the resident may not notice my positive body language.

Promoting self-esteem-Self-esteem shows an individual’s view of themselves and their self-worth. It is their attitude to themselves so what they think of themselves. This can be either negative or positive so if someone had a negative view of themselves such as they thought of themselves as unworthy they are likely to have a low self-esteem where as someone who regards themselves as worthy and important, they are likely to have a high self-esteem. An individual’s surroundings can also have an impact on their self-esteem. This is because, those around them may help either raise their self-esteem through praises, compliments and respect shown to them or can lower it by not respecting them or their choices, being negative towards such as calling them names which causes them to feel insecure or upset. An example of this can be that staff in a care home may encourage the residents to be independent which helps raise an individual’s self-esteem as its proof to them that they can do something without assistance from others, this could make the individual proud of themselves which then leads to their self-esteem improving. As a way of dealing with my resident harming themselves I would use this strategy to encourage my resident to stop this challenging behaviour. Promoting self-esteem can include me complimenting my resident and praising their positive behaviour for instance if my resident had got themselves dressed and ready and I had praised them saying well done this may encourage my resident to continue with this behaviour and may also feel good about themselves which then raises self-esteem. Raising my resident’s self-esteem and their self-confidence may lead to them being confident and comfortable with themselves which may then lead to them no longer feeling the need to harm themselves as this could have been done due to them feeling insecure about themselves. A low self-esteem and low confidence could lead to an individual being in a dark and lonely place so by ensuring that they are happy with themselves may encourage them to stop with this behaviour. Promoting self-esteem could be effective. This is because promoting self-esteem means raising my resident’s self-confidence. This is vital as it’s a possibility that by using this strategy and making my resident feel good about themselves, it may encourage my resident to no longer engage in self-destructive behaviour. It is effective because my resident may no longer feel low about themselves or feel anything negative so they may then stop engaging in this behaviour. However, this strategy may not be effective for many reasons. It is likely that by raising my resident’s self-confidence, it may be raised too high which means they may become blind to their faults or anything negative about them. This is not useful because this could make communication between my resident and I very difficult. Another reason why it may be ineffective is because my resident may notice that I am trying to raise her self-esteem which she may not be happy about. My resident may believe that I am trying to change her instead of accepting her for who she is. This may then lead to my resident engaging in self-destructive behaviour due to her thinking that I am not accepting her for who she is.

Anti-Discriminatory Practice – This means treating a person or group unfairly because of a characteristic, such as gender, disability, age, ethnic origin, skin colour, nationality, sexuality and/or religious belief. Discrimination has been described as putting prejudices into practice. All organisation which people work for must have policies which give guidance on the anti-discriminatory practice to ensure that anyone is not getting discriminated against at work. Employers should provide training sessions about the anti-discriminatory practice to raise awareness and to inform people about how they could prevent and deal with discrimination. As a way of dealing with my resident harming themselves and engaging in self-destructive behaviour, I would use this anti-discriminatory practice. By using this strategy, I can ensure that my resident is treated with respect and dignity and ensure that they are treated equally so that they don’t feel like they are the odd one out or as if they are less important and significant compared to others. This is useful as it may encourage my resident to no longer engage in harmful behaviour as negative feelings such as feeling less important and feeling like you don’t belong may cause you to feel self-conscious and doubt yourself which is why this strategy is useful. By treating all the residents equally, I can ensure my resident feels as though they are important and they aren’t the odd one out. This strategy is effective for many reasons, for instance it makes sure that all individuals within the care home feels equally as important and no one is left feeling lonely. This is effective as it can ensure that my resident does not engage in self-destructive behaviour. This is because I’ll be treating her the same as other residents, with care compassion and respect. This means that my resident won’t be worried about what individual’s think of her or even feeling like she doesn’t belong. It is effective also because this practice ensures that all individuals are given equal chances and opportunities. This is effective as my resident may then feel more like an individual and have opportunities to do what she wants, such as any goals or ambitions she has which won’t be dismissed due to her age, gender, ethnic background etc. This is useful as this may encourage my resident to stop engaging in self-destructive behaviour as she will be given equal rights and opportunities so she won’t feel like the odd one out. However, this strategy may not be effective when dealing with my resident who is showing self-destructive behaviour. This is because, in some circumstances there may be times where as a carer I would need to choose one resident over the other, such as if there was an argument I may have to choose a side and get the other individual to apologise. This may then cause my resident to feel as though they are being discriminate against which can lead to her engaging in harmful and self-destructive behaviour as a way of coping with this.

Empowering and Involving Individuals- Empowerment for health is a process in health promotion through which people gain greater control over decisions and actions affecting their health. Empowerment may be a social, cultural, psychological or political process through which individuals and social groups are able to express their needs, present their concerns, devise strategies for involvement in decision-making, and achieve political, social and cultural action to meet those needs. By empowering people and giving them the power and authority to do or say things, this may encourage individuals to be more independent and determined. Involving individual’s means that you are involving the individual in things that involve them such as decision making about their health and wellbeing. As a carer I would use this strategy as a way of dealing with my resident harming themselves and showing self-destructive behaviour. By empowering my resident and involving them in things that involve them such as decisions about their medication, visits, small decisions such as diet and exercise etc, this may encourage my resident to stop with these types of behaviours and harming themselves. This is because it is likely that my resident may decide to show these types of behaviours and harm themselves out of frustration and anger due to not having control over their life and not being able to decide for themselves what’s most suited for them etc. By empowering my resident and giving them power, they may feel as though they do have control and their life is still theirs which can then overtake any negative emotions they had, eventually stopping the self-destructive behaviour. This strategy is effective because empowering my resident teaches them that they can be independent and do the things they wish to do with the help of myself and other carers. This is useful as by giving them control over their life, this will help them understand that although they are living in a residential, she still has control over their lives. Empowering and involving the individual in all activities will make them feel as though they belong and they will also be included. This may then encourage my resident to stop engaging in self-destructive behaviour as they won’t feel left out or feel as though they aren’t wanted. Having no negative feelings may not lead to wanting to engage in self-destructive behaviour. However, this strategy may not be effective, this is because my resident may believe that I am trying to change them which could cause them to worry about the way they are leading to self-destructive behaviour as a way of coping with these negative feelings of my resident doubting themselves.

Risk Assessment- This means thinking about what might cause harm to people and decide whether you are taking reasonable steps to prevent that harm, t is something you are required by law to carry out. A risk assessment includes identifying sensible measures to control the risks in your workplace. There are many ways to assess the risks in a workplace: identify the hazards, decide who might be harmed and how, evaluate the risks and decide on precautions, record your significant findings and review your assessment and update if necessary. To deal with my resident showing self-destructive behaviour and harming themselves, I would do a risk assessment of my resident’s surroundings such as their bedroom, toilet, lounge area etc to ensure that there are no items which can be used by my resident to cause themselves harm. An example of this can be: forks and knives in the dining room may be placed out of reach from my client to ensure that this cannot be used to hurt themselves. Risk assessments are vital to do this is because this can help protect my resident’s life. This is vital to do as if my resident was triggered for any reason such as an argument with another resident or a disagreement with a staff which can cause her tension and frustration leading her to hurt herself as a coping mechanism. If a risk assessment was not done, it would be easier for my resident to hurt herself which is what we want to stop. Risk assessments can be effective when dealing with this challenging behaviour. This is because, this can essentially stop my resident engaging in self-destructive behaviour. It will help me keep my residents safe and protected from any danger or hazards. Another reason why it is effective is because risk assessments may limit the rate of accidents and incidents within the care home which is important as it will make the environment safer for all individuals. However, this strategy may not be effective as although risk assessments are useful, they don’t always stop accidents from happening. Accidents and incidents can occur at all times due to anything within the residential house. Also, things within the care home may not always go the way expected, for instance although risk assessments may be done, it is possible a new situation occurs which no one is prepared for. This is ineffective as you cannot always be prepared for it.

Workforce training-Workforce training is a widespread group of programs focussed towards producing workers whose skills match with economic demands. This ensures that the staff and the workforce are getting the best quality presentation. Workforce training also makes sure that they are keeping them motivated and reducing turnover. ETI ensures the organisation knows certain and effective training so that the organisations investment increases productivity and employee satisfaction. This helps to improve and develop the skills of existing employees or members of any organisation. As a carer I would use this strategy to prevent my resident from engaging in self-destructive behaviour. This is because by having training I can teach other staff members to cope with certain situations effectively and ensure that they are doing their best to prevent residents from harming themselves. This also shows residents that our main aim to keep all residents safe and protected which can help them understand and encourage themselves to not engage in challenging behaviour as we don’t want them to get hurt. Work force training is an effective strategy because it will help me learn new techniques of dealing with residents who may be showing challenging behaviours. This may help the residents stop engaging in challenging behaviours as they may realise that I am interested in their safety and that I am putting effort into caring for them by trying to develop my skills. Another reason as to why workforce training is effective is that it may encourage staff to continue working and they won’t be worried about any harm. This is useful as they may then be positive and confident in how to deal with all situations. Also, work force training means that there will be fewer accidents as the staff will know how to prevent these accident from occurring. However, the work force training strategy could be ineffective as staff may never need to apply what they took away from the training while they are working with their residents as not all situations which are addressed in training will happen in real life so then this means a large amount of money may be spent for training that will never be used and a lot of valuable time will also be lost. This is another reason why it’s not useful as training is usually very long which means the staff could lose concentration throughout training so then they won’t exactly take in any information.

Providing Active Support- Active support is a person-centred approach to providing direct support. The main reason behind active support is to ensure that people with even the most significant disabilities have a constant, daily support to be involved in a variety of life activities and opportunities of their choice. The main results of active support are to provide more control, improve confidence and increase independence. As a carer I would use this strategy to deal with my resident harming themselves and showing self-destructive behaviour. By providing my resident with active support this would ensure that my resident is able to do things those around them may be doing and have opportunities to do things which they never got to do etc. By doing this, my resident may feel more ordinary, like everyone around them and be able to do everyday things, whether it is on their own or with support. It is likely that my resident felt frustrated with themselves due to not being able to do certain things so by providing active support, they may feel more able and feel quite proud of themselves for accomplishing certain things which can then encourage them to not harm themselves. Active support consists of utilising activities that need to be done e.g: shopping, tidying the bedroom, gardening etc. This strategy is effective when dealing with my resident engaging in self-destructive behaviour. This strategy could help change my residents view of themselves and see them in a more positive light. This is effective when dealing with challenging behaviour as if my resident is more confident which may lead to them no longer wanting to engage in self-destructive behaviour. It also effective as my resident will learn new skills and techniques which is effective as this can help develop my resident’s intellectual development and make her feel prouder of herself which is useful when trying to stop her from engaging in self-destructive behaviour. However, this strategy could also be ineffective because some residents may decide that active support is not what they wish to have. As they don’t want this, it may be hard to assist them in daily things which can then lead to them engaging in self-destructive behaviour as their needs may not be met. Another reason as to why it is an ineffective strategy is that residents may decide that they would prefer to depend on the carer so then they aren’t doing anything for themselves. This isn’t effective as the resident won’t be learning anything or being independent. This could teach them to depend on staff at all times even when it isn’t suitable so this can cause the resident stress when they can’t depend on anyone.

Medication- People accessing care services often require assistance with medication. Organisations such as a care home have the responsibility to ensure the correct, safe and proper use of medication and the staff that are responsible for the management of medication are suitably trained and are competent.  As my resident suffers from Alzheimer’s disease, the main medication may be: donepezil (Aricept), rivastigmine (Exelon) and galantamine (Reminyl) which could all be used to treat Alzheimer’s and all work the same way. To care and deal with my resident showing harmful and destructive behaviour I would ensure that my resident’s medication intake is correct so the correct medication which has been prescribed to them, the correct dosage and at the time recommended. This is because, not providing the correct medication can cause problems to my resident which can therefore impact my resident’s behaviour causing them to harm themselves due to any side effects. Also, my resident may be in pain and unwell which can include having an infection or in discomfort. This can result in my resident harming themselves as a way of coping with the pain, so a carer I would ensure that correct medication is given to help ease the pain and ensure that they aren’t hurting so they no longer feel the need to harm themselves out of frustration. Medication could be a very effective strategy to use for my residents. This is because medication is a fast treatment and a quick way for my residents to feel better and their health to improve. Therefore, if medication helps them feel better, it is likely that they won’t engage in challenging behaviour anymore. Another reason as to why medication is an effective strategy is that it could change a person’s mind-set. For example, placebo which is a fake drug may be used to help the resident feel better. If they think the medication is making them feel better, they may be encouraged to do things and be more active due to believing that the painkiller helped, in fact they did it themselves without medication. However, this strategy could also be ineffective as medication is not a long term problem solver. This may help the symptoms at the time but it won’t get rid of the whole condition or illness.  Another reason as to why this strategy could be ineffective is that medication they need to be handled well. Patients with dementia related illnesses could overdose or not take their medication on time so staff will be required to assist with them. This can cause the resident to engage in challenging behaviour as of frustration due to not being able to take medication without help.

Seeking Help- This is looking for support and guidance when struggling with something. For instance from friends and family or professionals. Health and social care settings such as G.P surgeries, dentists, and walk in centre are all services that give people help when they require it. As a carer I would ensure if I required help when dealing with the resident, I ask for it. This is because I may struggle coping by myself when caring for my resident so by having someone with me, I can make sure that residents are getting the best care possible. Also, if a resident needed help and they asked me, I would make sure I give them help or guide them to someone that can offer the help they require. Seeking help is an effective strategy as it could help me and my residents at difficult situations. For example, if I was struggling to cope and I didn’t ask for help, I would put my life in danger as well as the residents and other staff members. By asking for help I can ensure that the resident’s needs are met and I am content too.  Another reason as to why seeking help is an effective strategy is that residents may feel more confident asking me for help if I offer help and show them that I’m here for them. This is a positive as this ensures that my resident and I have a good relationship. However, this strategy could also be ineffective. This is because there may be a chance that my resident is too embarrassed or shy to ask for help due to being worried that I won’t offer any help. This is ineffective as this could cause my resident to overthink which can then lead to self-destructive behaviour. Another reason as to why this strategy could be ineffective is that the resident could be worried their identity won’t be kept hidden and everyone may find out about their problems which can cause them to not trust staff members and no longer ask for help which can lead to self-destructive behaviour as worrying can cause stress.

Psychotherapy-This is a type of therapy used to treat emotional problems and mental health conditions. It involves talking to a trained therapist either one-to-one, in a group or with your partner. It allows you to look deeper into a person’s problems and any worries they may have and deal with habits and a wide range of disorders such as depression or schizophrenia. This usually involves talking but other methods can be used such as art, music, drama and more to help someone express themselves. To deal with my resident showing self-destructive behaviour I would use this strategy. I would encourage my resident to take part in either group therapy or one to one, this is because by allowing them to express themselves may help release any feelings of anger or frustration, and this may then lead to them no longer feeling the need to harm themselves. As psychotherapy involves art, music, drama etc, this may help my resident express themselves more also, by focusing on this, they may not think about harming themselves or have any worries which may then lead to self-destructive behaviour. This strategy can be effective because this means that my resident may learn how to properly express themselves such as their emotions and their worries. Psychotherapy may also teach my residents how to cope with their emotions and turn their negative ones into positive which is also another reason why it is effective as this can teach them to be more positive in negative situations. This could help them stop engaging in challenging behaviour as they may feel stressed or worried anymore. Another reason as to why this is an effective strategy is that it could help raise their self-esteem and their confidence. This will help them fully express themselves and be content with themselves which may mean they no longer feel the need to engage in self-destructive behaviour.  However, this strategy could also be ineffective as it may take a long time to fully learn how to cope with overwhelming emotions and how to change the negatives into positives. Another reason as to why this strategy could ineffective as that the residents may choose not to take part in this as they think it’s useless or a waste of time. This is ineffective as if they choose not to take part then this strategy can’t be used to help them.

Managing the Aftermath- Managing the aftermath may mean dealing with the results of an individual’s actions. An example of this can be a student has become aggressive due to a fight with another student leading to them physically abusing those around him. The teacher would then ensure that all students are safe and well, they may then separate the children from each other and contact their parents and ensure that they are aware of what has happened. To deal with my resident’s self-destructive behaviour I would use this strategy. I would ensure that I help them manage the aftermath well to help improve their life and change for the better. For my resident I would ensure that I manage the situation well and I don’t lash out or show any negative feelings towards them. By remaining calm I can ensure that they feel protected and they understand that my job is to help and assist them and that I aim to make sure that they don’t feel the need to engage in self-destructive behaviour. Managing the aftermath is an effective strategy. This is because it will help the residents understand that our job is to ensure that their needs are met and they are protected. If they know and understand this, they may choose not to engage in self-destructive behaviour due to having supportive carers. It is also effective as it may help prevent the same situations from happening or however if the same problems did occur, staff members would know to deal with it. However, this could also be an ineffective strategy because if the resident continues showing this behaviour, staff would have to think of other ways to prevent this, this can take time to do which means if this challenging behaviour continues to occur, it won’t be dealt with properly. Also residents may not learn from previous challenging behaviour or may decide that they don’t want to change their behaviour which is a problem as they’ll continue with the self-destructive behaviour.

Communication with Individuals – Communicating with individuals is mainly just speaking and listening and conversing back and forth such as: in person or social media. Communicating with the residents is effective as this can help you understand their side and their opinions and they can understand your thoughts and views. Communicating and listening to a person will help people understand each other well. For example, in a hospital the staff will need to communicate properly to make sure everything is done properly and nothing goes wrong, such as a wrong dosage of medication is given. As a carer I would communicate with my resident to make sure that my residents are happy and content and they don’t have any problems. This would help me do my job well as I will be aware of what my residents need from me and what they aren’t pleased with. An example can be that my resident may not want to attend certain leisure activities or they may want to rearrange a visit. This could encourage my residents to stop engaging in challenging behaviour as they may begin to feel as though they can open up and speak to me about any worries. Communicating with my resident is very effective as by having good communication skills and by communicating well with them I can make sure that I am aware of any worries they may have so then I can aim to resolve this. This is also effective as by being aware of their problems and issues, I can guide them towards what help they require. For instance, if a resident was feeling suicidal or needed someone to speak to about personal problems, I may get a therapist to speak to them daily and ensure that their emotional and mental health is well. However, it can be ineffective too as communication may not always work well. As my resident has dementia which has links to memory loss so my resident may forget everything I said so I’d have to repeat myself or they may not hear properly due to being old. This is a problem as this could mean that my resident doesn’t understand me or they can’t keep what I said in their mind due to memory loss. Another reason why it is ineffective is because my resident may decide that they don’t want to communicate with me which is a problem as I won’t be aware of their worries. This can then lead to self-destructive behaviour as they have no one to share their problems with.

Using Appropriate Physical Restraint- Physical restraints is anything on the body restricts movement. An example of physical restraint is bed rail which is used to keep residents kept to the bed. Physical restrain would be used to ensure that residents are doing something that is harmful to them or to others. If a resident was showing physical abuse to another resident, staff would be required to step in and use physical restraint to keep them two away from each other as they could harm eachother. As a carer I would use appropriate physical restraint against my residents when required. For instance, if a resident tried to hit me due to disagreeing with what I said, I would have to use this strategy and restrain them from doing so. Also, I would try not to make them feel uncomfortable or in pain when doing so as this may encourage my residents to engage in challenging behaviour as I had to physically interfere which can cause them to feel bad. Using appropriate physical restraint could be an effective strategy. This is because it helps me keep my resident safe, as if I saw them engaging in self-destructive behaviour I would interfere and stop them so that they don’t succeed. Another reason as to why it is an effective strategy is that it could reduce the risks of them hurting themselves as well or others around them. This may show them that I care for their well-being which can help them to stop engaging in it, this can encourage them to stop this challenging behaviour. However, this strategy could also be ineffective. This is because it could increase danger to myself and others around us by intervening and trying to restrain them, this can cause more aggression and they could hurt those around them. Another reason to why it could be ineffective is that it could make them feel lonely as having bed rails may mean that they can’t get out whenever they wish so they may not be able to wonder around and socialise.

Behaviour Modification Programmes- This is a treatment approach that aims to change people’s behaviour. The purpose of this is to substitute any undesirable behaviours with changed and positive behaviours. People learn to correct set of responses for given stimulus by using a system of positive and negative consequences. Behaviour modification programmes have been very successful in treating different disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias, autism, disruptive behaviour, hyperactivity disorder, separation anxiety and generalized anxiety disorder. As a carer, I would use behaviour modification programmes to help my residents to stop them from engaging in self-destructive behaviour by helping them change their challenging behaviours and to replace it with positive behaviours. For example, this can help teach them to react more positively to negative news. For instance, instead of hurting themselves when they feel stressed, I can teach them to draw and paint. By learning new methods of behaviour management, they can deal with negative emotions more better. Using behaviour modification programmes could be effective. This is because it teaches my resident how to properly deal with their negative emotions and focus more on the positives. Therefore, it may help them overcome their problems which could encourage them to stop showing challenging behaviours such a harmful and self-destructive behaviours. This will help remove the negativity and not be as stressed. Another reason to why it is effective is that this may be done in a short amount of time so behaviour can be changed within for example, a few weeks if they are constantly encouraged and reminded. However, this strategy could also be ineffective. This is because this strategy tends to only treat the negative behaviours and not the cause. For instance, they may still show negative behaviours due to symptoms such as being in pain. Another reason to why the strategy is in effective is that it is not long term so the same behaviour can be shown whenever the resident wishes.

Using Physical Intervention- This is any direct physical contact between a carer and the resident with challenging behaviour, any use of barriers such as locked doors, or use of equipment’s and materials to stop movement. Physical intervention should be minimal force and not cause pain and it should be used with other strategies to help people understand and learn to behave in non-challenging ways. This links to the case study as I would use physical intervention when dealing with my resident when showing self-destructive behaviour. For instance: if my resident was becoming abusive to themselves I would intervene and physically restrict from doing so, this could include holding their hands together or by holding them against the wall to make sure that they don’t harm themselves. I could also lock them in a room when they are becoming agitated and they feel the need to harm themselves, this is because by keeping them away from others it could help them calm down and relax which can help stop this challenging behaviour. This strategy can be effective as using this strategy may mean that the resident’s lives are being protected and they are kept safe from themselves too. By restricting them from hurting themselves, this may teach them that as a carer our job is to help and support them so we won’t allow them to harm themselves which can lead to them no longer attempting this challenging behaviour as they won’t succeed. It’s also useful as this may show other residents that this behaviour won’t be accepted and will help understand that there are other ways of coping with their emotions. However, it may not be effective as some residents may see physical intervention as abuse as staff would have to intervene which could be too harsh for others, the resident may see this abuse and could lead to them harming themselves more. It is also ineffective as it isn’t always possible to physically intervene as we might not always be aware of this behaviour.

Remaining Calm and Controlled When Provoked- This is when you stay calm and collected when someone is testing your patience and trying to cause you to lash out. This can be done by irritating you and being rude. This can occur in many health and social care setting such as a school. A student may try and cause the teacher anger when the student is getting told off their behaviour, the teacher’s patient would be tested and would need to stay professional and came.As a carer, I would try to remain calm and cool if my residents try to provoke me. This is because if I react to them, this would be unprofessional and may also cause conflict as it could to a disagreement or arguments. Also, if I remain calm they will eventually become calm as well. This is because they aren’t getting the reaction they wanted to get. By remaining calm, I can show that although negative behaviour isn’t accepted, I am fine with it and my overall aim is to help them and not argue. This can help my residents understand and we can aim to then move on from this. Remaining Calm and Controlled When Provoked is an effective strategy this is because it will show my residents that I am professional and I aim to assist them and not argue with them. This will help them understand that my job is to ensure their needs are met and that they are content therefore they may stop provoking me as their aim to provoke me is not working. However, this strategy can be ineffective as it is possible that I may get frustrated with the residents which can lead me to lash out. It’s also ineffective as the residents may think that it is okay to cause the staff distress and try to provoke them as they aren’t getting any responses which may make them think this behaviour is acceptable which it isn’t.

Integrated Practice- Delivering integrated practice is when individuals benefit from that is co-ordinated and person-centred in the health and social care setting. In order for care to be integrated it is vital for the care professionals and the organisation to bring together different parts of care that an individual is required. An individual’s care could be provided by a range of different health and social care professionals across different providers. As for this reason health and social care services might not be easily accessible and it might not be based around their requirements and needs. Great integrated practice could minimise repetition, duplication and gaps in service delivery, confusion, delay and people getting lost in the system. It is vital to deliver integrated care in order to better the results for individuals who use the health and social care services. It could also better financial savings as it minimises gaps and inefficiencies in care. This minimises the effects of harmful/ self-destructive behaviour of my resident who is a resident with a quite so severe case of Alzheimer’s. This is because it would allow them to access the services in the residential home easily and it would be based around their requirements and needs so therefore it would allow my resident to easily get her requirements met which would lower her risks of getting confused and help her to feel more accepted and heard which would also minimise the effects of harmful/self-destructive behaviour. Working as an integrated practice can be effective. This is because it will show all staff and residents that we are there to provide support for everyone and we work together to resolve problems. Another reason to why it is an effective strategy is that it allows the residents to have a good relationship with the staff members as they know that all staff are there to support them and help them. However, this strategy can be ineffective. This is because it is likely that not all individuals will agree on certain things, this can cause issues within the care home and may even cause problems Another reason to why it could be ineffective is that the residents may not be happy with everyone being involved in their issues, this can be an issue as they may feel as though everyone is too focused on the individuals issues rather than their own, this can cause them to feel exposed.

References.

https://www.skillsforcare.org.uk/Topics/Learning-disability/Positive-behavioural-support/Positive-behaviour-support.aspx

https://www.skillsforcare.org.uk/Topics/Medication/Medication.aspx

https://inclusive-solutions.com/person-centred-planning/

https://rcni.com/hosted-content/rcn/first-steps/anti-discriminatory-practice

Cite This Work

To export a reference to this article please select a referencing stye below:

Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.

Related Services

View all

DMCA / Removal Request

If you are the original writer of this essay and no longer wish to have the essay published on the UK Essays website then please:

McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams Prices from
£28

Undergraduate 2:2 • 250 words • 7 day delivery

Order now

Delivered on-time or your money back

Rated 4.4 out of 5 by
Reviews.co.uk Logo (37 Reviews)

Get Expert Help with your assignment