Technology and employee attitude, Motivation, Job satisfaction and Health

ABSTRACT

While creating this report we tried to present technology from different point of view. We can see that the technology has both a positive and negative side in society. Positive in a sense that people's life cycle is changing. They are motivated to do work. Even the companies can expand their business and can be connected by network with the other branches. Technology development is also seen beneficial for health. New equipments are invented that is causing various maladies to be cured. Technology has a huge impact on performance of people. They are enthusiastic to do any kind of job which is related to the technology. So the help of technology in our life is countless yet since it leads to deskilling. An effect on worker who once needed a skill but no longer needed as it has been taken up by new technology. Technology has made people idle as well as made the work easier and time consuming for the people. In this whole report we basically focused on how technology has impact on individual segment like employee attitude, motivation, job satisfaction and health. A study investigated the effects of new technologies, specifically visual display units, on psychosomatic complaints and job satisfaction. Attention was focused on the influences of the work situation (job contents, employee participation), of attitudes and individual differences. The report contains the effect of technology in different sector and how the researchers differentiated those. Here we have added fifteen abstract on the different segments of technology and also discussed those in our own language that what actually we would be able to understand from those abstracts. We also recommended what should be done to enhance technological use more.

INTRODUCTION

1. Are the employees satisfied with the new technology?

2. How new technology motivate employee to do their work more?

3. How new technology increase employee motivation?

4. What are the employee attitudes toward new technology?

5. How close new technology change employee attitude toward organization?

6. What are the employee attitudes toward new technology)?

These are the question which helps us to doing this report. Our main purpose is to know how the new technology satisfied the employee. How new technology motivate employee to do their work more. How new technology increase employee motivation. What are the employee attitudes toward new technology? What are the employee attitudes toward new technology? This question basically gives new answers and ideas as well. Answers of these questions will increase organization's productivity as well as will reduce the rate of turnover. When we will enter in our job sector or in the corporate world being as a HR manager it will be easy for us to take the big decisions whether my employees are motivated by the new technology or not, whether they are satisfied with the technological change or not. How employees react with the new technology? This research is not the final as practical experience and the theoretical assessment is totally two different scenarios.

METHOD

To begin the report, we needed to at fast found some specific question on technology. From there we found some key word. For example technology's relation with motivation, satisfaction, attitude performance, and health .from this topic we found some more to the point questions. Then by browsing through several website like INFORMA WORLD, GOOGLR we found some related abstract of this question. We acknowledged the knowledge of researchers. This is how we made this report.

RESULT

1. Science and technology for wealth and health in developing countries

Author: T. Acharya a

Publication Frequency: 6 issues per year

Published in: Global Public Health, Volume 2, Issue 1 January 2007 , pages 53 - 63

Subjects: AIDS & HIV; Behavioral Medicine; Development - Soc Sci; Globalisation; Health Geography; Health Policy; Medical Sociology; Public Health - Medical Sociology; Risk; Third World Studies;

Formats available: HTML (English) : PDF (English)

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Abstract

It is now widely accepted that the developing world needs to invest in science and technology or risk falling behind as the technology gap between the North and South widens. However, these investments must be balanced by continued investment in basic population-wide services, such as healthcare and water supply and sanitation. Achieving this balance is a matter of ongoing debate in policy circles, and leaders and policy-makers in developing countries often have to make difficult decisions that pit investment in new technologies and capacity-building in science and technology against basic population-wide services such as healthcare and water supply and sanitation. The tension is underscored by evidence which suggests that rapidly industrializing economies, like in China, India and Brazil, are actually experiencing a rise in economic and health disparities among their populations. This article shows that science and technology can make an important and vital contribution to development, using public health as an example. It suggests the need to focus investments in science and technology in such a way that they can have a positive impact on public health. For instance, the use of simple, hand-held molecular diagnostic tools can help unskilled health workers rapidly and accurately diagnose diseases, thus helping to reduce healthcare costs due to delayed or incorrect diagnoses. Recombinant vaccines can mitigate the risk of infection associated with live or attenuated vaccines, while needle-less delivery methods can help contain the spread of blood-borne infections.
Critical to making technology investments work for population health are government policies and strategies that align public health goals and technology priorities. Such policies can include cross-sectoral training programs to improve dialogue between the technology and health sectors, setting up technology transfer cells to increase commercialization of health research relevant to local needs, and leveraging the phenomenon of low-margin high-volume marketing for health products.

2. A theoretical model of health information technology usage behavior with implications for patient safety

Authors: Richard J. Holden ab; Ben-Tzion Karsh a

Publication Frequency: 6 issues per year

Published in: Behaviour & Information Technology, Volume 28, Issue 1 January 2009 , pages 21 - 38

First Published: January 2009

Subjects: Behavioral Psychology; Health & Safety Aspects of Computing; Human Computer Interaction; Human Performance Modelling; Social Aspects of Computing & IT; User Interface; Web Usability;

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Abstract

Primary objective: Much research and practice related to the design and implementation of information technology in health care has been atheoretical. It is argued that using extant theory to develop testable models of health information technology (HIT) benefits both research and practice. Methods and procedures: several theories of motivation, decision making, and technology acceptance are reviewed and associated theory-based principles of HIT usage behaviour are produced. Main outcomes and results: the case of medical error reporting technology is used to support the validity of the proposed HIT usage behaviour principles. Further, combining these principles produces a testable, theoretical multilevel model of HIT usage behaviour. The model provides an alternative to atheoretical research and practice related to HIT. Conclusions: developing, testing, and revising models of HIT like the one presented here is suggested to be beneficial to researchers and practitioners alike.

3. The Effect of New Technologies on Job Satisfaction and Psychosomatic Complaints

Authors: James P. Guthrie a; Patrick C. Flood b; Wenchuan Liu c; Sarah MacCurtain

Publication Frequency: 12 issues per year

Published in: The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Volume 20, Issue 1 January 2009 , pages 112 - 125

Subject: Personnel and Human Resource Management;

Formats available: HTML (English) : PDF (English)

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Abstract

This study investigated the effects of new technologies, specifically visual display units, on psychosomatic complaints and job satisfaction. Attention was focused on the influences of the work situation (job contents, employee participation), of attitudes and individual differences. A partly longitudinal research design was used to study 171 employees of seven companies (involved in construction, office work, and simple services). Measurements were taken 2 months before and 12 months after the conversion to new technologies. Job contents and employee participation were measured by objective instruments. New technologies increased psychosomatic complaints and changed job satisfaction, but the degree of change in these two variables depended on job contents, level of employee participation, and gender. Interactions between type of activity, participation, and gender were found and discussed as typical signs of the work situation with new technologies. Furthermore, effects of work with new technologies were interrelated with attitudes and individual differences. While the implementation of new technology as such made no significant contribution to the explanation of strain variables, a reasonable model fit was achieved when implementation characteristics were taken into account. The data suggest that negative effects of implementations must be expected if (1) adaptational demands do not include the enhancement of employee qualifications, (2) character-based user interfaces are not replaced, and (3) employees have few or no opportunities to participate in the implementation process.

4. Employee attitudes toward new technology in a unionized manufacturing plant

Authors: Laszlo A. Pook a; M. Ellen Pook; Jaacutenos Fuumlstoumls b (Show Biographies)

Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year

Published in: Journal of East-West Business, Volume 6, Issue 3 March 2001 , pages 93 - 110

Formats available: PDF (English)

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Abstract:

The most important elements that influence how employees view technological change within organizations are formal advance notices of new technology, pre-existing job and power structure differences during the implementation of the changes, and work environment. Employee attitudes toward new technology in the workplace are more strongly affected by organizational rather than technical factors as commonly thought. Labor unions, contrary to popular belief, view technological change positively, and can be a contributing factor to the facilitation of change within the firm.

5. Effects of the implementation of information technology on employees' strain and job satisfaction

Authors: Christian Korunka; Oliver Vitouch

Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year

Published in: Work & Stress, Volume 13, Issue 4 October 1999 , pages 341 - 363

Subjects: Behavioral Medicine; Health Psychology; Occupational/Industrial Health & Safety; Office & Workplace; Work & Organizational Psychology;

Formats available: PDF (English)

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Abstract

The effects on staff of the implementation of new office information technology were investigated in ten companies in Vienna using a longitudinal design. Strain and satisfaction of 331 employees (implementation sample: n = 212; control sample: n = 119) were measured at five points in time over a period of 22 months. The study is based on a context-dependent approach. Personal factors (individual differences, external load) were assessed by questionnaires and situational factors (job design, implementation content and implementation context) by objective measures. The impact of these factors on employees' strain responses was tested using structural equation modeling (SEM). While the implementation of new technology as such made no significant contribution to the explanation of strain variables, a reasonable model fit was achieved when implementation characteristics were taken into account. The data suggest that negative effects of implementations must be expected if (1) adaptation demands do not include the enhancement of employee qualifications, (2) character-based user interfaces are not

6. The effects of new technology adoption on employee skills in the prosthetics profession

Authors: H. Wagner a; A. Dainty b; R. Hague a; C. Tuck a; M. H. Ong a

Publication Frequency: 24 issues per year

Published in: International Journal of Production Research, Volume 46, Issue 22 November 2008 , pages 6461 - 6478

First Published: November 2008

Subjects: Logistics; Manufacturing Engineering; Manufacturing Industries; Manufacturing Technology; Operations Management; Production & Quality Control Management; Production Research & Economics; Production Systems; Production Systems & Automation;

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Abstract

Rapid manufacturing (RM) is an emerging technology that is set to revolutionize how products are manufactured. Past research has centred on processes, materials and costing, neglecting the vital issue of how the implementation of this new technology will affect the skills of workers. This work aims to evaluate how the skills of professionals working in the field of prosthetics are likely to be affected by the introduction of RM. Currently a highly skilled, manual process, this paper explores the hypothesis that the manufacture of prosthetic sockets would change fundamentally with the introduction of RM technology. This was evaluated through the use of the job characteristics model, which assesses the skills change and job satisfaction implications of applying new technology to traditional manufacturing processes. Conclusions showed that RM would have a significant impact on job roles in the prosthetics industry. Analysis found a positive outlook for the prosthetist, with the new technology increasing computer-based skills, and traditional prosthetic skills continuing to be used. The prosthetic technician bears the major impact

7. Risks in new product development and the satisfaction of Employees through technology

Author: O. Joseph Akomode

Published in: Production Planning & Control, Volume 10, Issue 1 January 1999 , pages 35 - 47

Subjects: Engineering Project Management; Manufacturing Engineering; Operational Research; Operations Management; Production & Quality Control Management; Production Systems; Quality Control & Reliability;

Abstract

quately determined, poorly structured, under evaluated and vaguely expressed, problems may be increased in the subsequent risk management programme. This paper discusses the evaluation of risk elements associated with the development ofnew products/servicesand proposes a risk assessment method/ model for: (a) selecting potential products/services as a When risk factors associated with the development of a new product/service and customers' satisfaction are inade tive mechanism; and (b) monitoring and measuring customers' satisfaction. The main aims are to assist managers and other professionals with an analytical framework based on the potential of Information Technology (IT) for: (i) effective evaluation of business risks relating to the prediction and development of new products/services; and (ii) monitoring, measurement, feedback and control of customers' satisfaction. The proposed method and models include the application of: (a) multicriteria decision making involving the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP); (b) statistical computation involving Cronbach's reliability coefficient; and (c) survey validity. The proposed framework may support business risk evaluators concerned with the development of new products/services and the assessment of customers' satisfaction in effective decision making, especially when attempting to improve a firm's competitiveness and increase its profitability.

Keywords: Risk; Evaluation; New; Product; Development; Analytic; Hierarchy; Process; Measuring; Customers'; Satisfaction; Reliability/validity

8. The intention behavior gap in technology usage: the moderating role of attitude strength

Authors: A. Bhattacherjee a; C. Sanford b

b Department of MIS, College of Commerce, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan

Published in: Behaviour & Information Technology

First Published on: 29 January 2009

Subjects: Behavioral Psychology; Health & Safety Aspects of Computing; Human Computer Interaction; Human Performance Modelling; Social Aspects of Computing & IT; User Interface; Web Usability;

Abstract

Extant theories of information technology (IT) usage present users' behavioural intention as the primary predictor of their IT usage behaviour. However, empirical evidence reveals only a low-to-medium effect size for this association. We call this inconsistency the ‘intention-behaviour gap', and argue that a clearer understanding of this gap requires a deeper theoretical examination of the conditions under which intentions may or may not influence behaviour. Drawing on recent attitude theoretic research in social psychology, we distinguish between two types of attitudes - strong versus weak - and suggest that the intention-behaviour association may hold for users with strong attitudes but is likely to be weaker for those with weak attitudes. Using the elaboration-likelihood model, we propose two dimensions of attitude strength relevant to the IT usage context - personal relevance and related expertise - and theorise them to moderate the intention-behaviour association in a positive manner. Results from a longitudinal field survey of document management system usage among governmental employees at L'viv City Hall, Ukraine support our theoretical hypotheses. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings are discussed.

9. The Influence of Technology-Enabled Customer Relationship Management on Customers' Attitude toward Service Quality and Loyalty

Authors: Hee “Andy” Lee a; Carolyn U. Lambert b

b Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Published in: Journal of Foodservice Business Research, Volume 11, Issue 4 December 2008, pages 363 - 381

Abstract

The main objective of this study was to test empirically the Paraguayan and Growl's quality-value-loyalty chain model (2000) in a restaurant context. The quality-value-loyalty chain model integrates the importance of relationships between technology and customers, employees, and the company. Survey participants were asked to evaluate scenarios describing a restaurant experience where customized services were provided through information technology and without customized services. The principal finding was that participants evaluated service quality in the customized service setting higher and the assurance factor had a positive linear relationship with attitude toward personal information utilization by a service provider.

Keywords: Customer relationship management (CRM); loyalty; service quality; perceived value; quality-value-loyalty chain model

10. Office Technology and Employee Attitudes

Authors: Ronald Graef a; Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi a; Susan McManama Gianinno a

Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year

Published in: Leisure Studies, Volume 2, Issue 2 1983 , pages 155 - 168

Subjects: Leisure Studies; Social Geography;

Formats available: PDF (English)

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Abstract

The relationship between office computerization and employee gender and organizational level remains relatively unexplored. Based on earlier findings, this study predicted that individual attitudes towards technology would differ according to social background variables and the type of technology used. A survey of 81 office employees confirmed this and found that personal computers had effects statistically different from word processors and mainframe terminals. The implications for researchers as well as practitioners are discussed

11. Measuring intrinsic motivation in everyday life

Authors: Urs E. Gattiker, Barbara A. Gutter ,Dale E. Berger

Publication Frequency: 3 issues per year

SUBJECT: Office Technology and Employee Attitudes

Published in: International Journal of Production Research, Volume 46, Issue 22

November 2006 , pages 461 - 478

First Published: November 2006

Abstract

The question of motivation — of what makes people behave the way they do — has always been a primary concern. Since Thorndike's Law of Effect was published in 1911, the reasons for and the prediction of human (and animal) behavior has been extensively researched. The purpose of this paper is to expand motivational research by applying a newly developed research technology to an area of human behavior that has so far not been studied systematically, namely, everyday experiences. Specifically, we are interested in exploring two basic questions about motivation: 1. how often do people describe their everyday experiences as being free and intrinsically motivating; and 2. what is the relationship between intrinsically rewarding experiences and psychological well-being, or the overall sense of satisfaction with one's life

12. Task technology fit and individual performance

Author : Dale L. Goodhue

Information and decision sciences

University of Minnesota

Subject: Task Technology Fit and individual performance

Minneapolis. MN 55455

U.S.A

Abstract

A key concern in information system research has been to better understand the linkage between information system and individual performance. The research reported in this study has two primary objectives. (1) To propose a comprehensive theoretical model that incorporates valuable insights from two complementary streams of research and (2) To empirically test the core of the model. At the heart of the new model is the assertion that for an information technology to have a positive impact on individual performance

13. Technologist-entrepreneurs versus non-entrepreneurial technologists: analysis of motivational triggering factors

Authors: Erkko Autio a; Ilkka Kauranen a

Published in: Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Volume 6, Issue 4 October 1994 , pages 315 - 328

Subjects: Economic Geography; Entrepreneurship; Regional Geography - Human Geography;

Abstract

Here the motivational characteristics of technologist-entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurial technologists are compared. A factor analysis divides entrepreneurial motivations into four groups: exploitation of environmental opportunities, internal personal motivations, technology push motivations, and market pull motivations. The analysis suggests that, of these, internal personal motivations may be decisive for the decision to establish a new firm. While non-entrepreneurial technologists stress the importance of environmental, opportunities, technologist-entrepreneurs stress the importance of internal personal motivations. Technology push motivations and market pull motivations do not seem to distinguish technologist-entrepreneurs from non-entrepreneurial technologists. These findings have implications for the efforts to encourage the formation of new, technology-based firms in research communities. It is recommended that, in addition to designing support programmes aimed at encouraging researchers to establish new firms, increased effort should be directed at attracting potential entrepreneurs to research institutions. This aim can be achieved, for example, by working conditions in the research institutions emulating those of the science park.

14. The Influence of Technology-Enabled Employee Relationship Management on Employees' Attitude Toward Service Quality and Loyalty

Authors: Hee “Andy” Lee a; Carolyn U. Lambert b

Published in: Journal of Foodservice Business Research, Volume 11, Issue 4 December 2008 , pages 363 - 381

Subjects: Behavioral Psychology; Health & Safety Aspects of Computing; Human Computer Interaction; Human Performance Modelling; Social Aspects of Computing & IT; User Interface; Web Usability;

Abstract

The main objective of this study was to test empirically the Parasuraman and Grewal's quality-value-loyalty chain model (2000) in a restaurant context. The quality-value-loyalty chain model integrates the importance of relationships between technology and customers, employees, and the company. Survey participants were asked to evaluate scenarios describing a restaurant experience where customized services were provided through information technology and without customized services. The principal finding was that participants evaluated service quality in the customized service setting higher and the assurance factor had a positive linear relationship with attitude toward personal information utilization by a service provider.

15. The Intention-behavior gap in technology usage: the moderating role of attitude strength

Authors: Laszlo A. Pook a; M. Ellen Pook; Jaacutenos Fuumlstoumls b (Show Biographies)

Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year

Published in: Journal of East-West Business, Volume 6, Issue 3 March 2001 , pages 93 - 110

Formats available: PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

Abstract

Extant theories of information technology (IT) usage present users' behavioral intention as the primary predictor of their IT usage behaviour. However, empirical evidence reveals only a low-to-medium effect size for this association. We call this inconsistency the ‘intention-behaviour gap', and argue that a clearer understanding of this gap requires a deeper theoretical examination of the conditions under which intentions may or may not influence behaviour. Drawing on recent attitude theoretic research in social psychology, we distinguish between two types of attitudes - strong versus weak - and suggest that the intention-behaviour association may hold for users with strong attitudes but is likely to be weaker for those with weak attitudes. Using the elaboration-likelihood model, we propose two dimensions of attitude strength relevant to the IT usage context - personal relevance and related expertise - and theorise them to moderate the intention-behaviour association in a positive manner. Results from a longitudinal field survey of document management system usage among governmental employees at L'viv City Hall, Ukraine support our theoretical hypotheses. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings are discussed.

DISCUTION

1. Developing world needs to improve technology to compete with the developed countries and getting the facility of work as well. This article shows that science and technology can make an important and vital contribution to development, using public health as an example. It suggests the need to focus investments in science and technology in such a way that they can have a positive impact on public health\

This study explained the topic dividing it into 4 parts, (1) Primary objective, (2) . Methods and procedures, (3) Main outcomes and results, (4) Conclusions. Using these three points much research and implication has been completed. several theories of motivation, decision making, and technology acceptance are reviewed and associated theory-based principles of HIT usage behavior are produced

3. Here the main findings is effects of new technologies, specifically visual display units, on psychosomatic complaints and job satisfaction. Basically it drew the Attention which was focused on the influences of the work situation (job contents, employee participation), of attitudes and individual differences

4. How employees view technological change within organizations are formal advance notices of new technology, pre-existing job and power structure differences during the implementation of the changes, and work environment that is the prime focus in this abstract. Employee attitudes toward new technology in the workplace are more strongly affected by organizational rather than technical factors as commonly thought.

This study is basically context dependent approach where there is a survey on ten companies mentioned here and also mentioned the longitudinal design of Vienna. The implementation of new technology as such made no significant contribution to the explanation of strain variables; a reasonable model fit was achieved when implementation characteristics were taken into account.

This was evaluated through the use of the job characteristics model, which assesses the skills change and job satisfaction implications of applying new technology to traditional manufacturing processes. The prosthetic technician bears the major impact, deskilled by the loss of many of the craft skills. However, the new role may appeal to the younger generation, and lowered skill requirements may help increase prosthetics services worldwide.

The proposed framework may support business risk evaluators concerned with the development of new products/services and the assessment of employee satisfaction in effective decision making, especially when attempting to improve a firm's competitiveness and increase its profitability.

Drawing on recent attitude theoretic research in social psychology, we distinguish between two types of attitudes - strong versus weak - and suggest that the intention-behaviour association may hold for users with strong attitudes but is likely to be weaker for those with weak attitudes.

The principal finding was that participants evaluated service quality in the customized service setting higher and the assurance factor had a positive linear relationship with attitude toward personal information utilization by a service provider.

This study predicted that individual attitudes towards technology would differ according to social background variables and the type of technology used

11. The purpose of this paper is to expand motivational research by applying a newly developed research technology to an area of human behavior that has so far not been studied systematically, namely, everyday experiences. Specifically, we are interested in exploring two basic questions about motivation

The research reported in this study has two primary objectives. To propose a comprehensive theoretical model that incorporates valuable insights from two complementary streams of research and To empirically test the core of the model. At the heart of the new model is the assertion that for an information technology to have a positive impact on individual performance.

Technology push motivations and market pull motivations do not seem to distinguish technologist-entrepreneurs from non-entrepreneurial technologists. These findings have implications for the efforts to encourage the formation of new, technology-based firms in research communities.

To test empirically the Parasuraman and Grewal's quality-value-loyalty chain model (2000) in a restaurant context is the main objective of this study. The quality-value-loyalty chain model integrates the importance of relationships between technology and customers, employees, and the company.

15. Drawing on recent attitude theoretic research in social psychology, they distinguish between two types of attitudes - strong versus weak - and suggest that the intention-behaviour association may hold for users with strong attitudes but is likely to be weaker for those with weak attitudes. Using the elaboration-likelihood model, they propose two dimensions of attitude strength relevant to the IT usage context - personal relevance and related expertise - and theorise them to moderate the intention-behaviour association in a positive manner.

CONCLUSION

At the end of this report we have actually gathered a bulk amount of knowledge about the technology and its effect on employee's behavior, attitude, and health. Not only that how basically technology motivates the employees and employees become interested to do their work. Through this research we have also come to know that how the big authors and writers think about the effect of technology on those factors. This is a life time research as when we will enter our practical life in job sector we will be able to covert ourselves through this report.

Recommendation

After going through the whole report we have noticed that there are two kinds of effect one is positive and the other one is negative. Here we will say what employee should do in our language indeed.

We should not be wholly dependent on technology.
We should know the proper use of technology otherwise it will not motivate us to show better performance.
We should be careful about our health as technology has some negative impact on health.
Employee motivation, attitude and job satisfaction should not be all technology oriented other wise if some day technology crash employee satisfaction will go downwards.
Obviously the technology which will be used for employee motivation, attitude, job satisfaction that should be environment friendly.

REFERANCE

1. Author: T. Acharya a Publication Frequency: 6 issues per year

Published in: Global Public Health, Volume 2, Issue 1 January 2007 , pages 53 - 63

Subjects: AIDS & HIV; Behavioral Medicine; Development - Soc Sci; Globalisation; Health Geography; Health Policy; Medical Sociology; Public Health - Medical Sociology; Risk; Third World Studies;

Formats available: HTML (English) : PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

2. Authors: Richard J. Holden ab; Ben-Tzion Karsh a

Publication Frequency: 6 issues per year

Published in: Behaviour & Information Technology, Volume 28, Issue 1 January 2009 , pages 21 - 38

First Published: January 2009

Subjects: Behavioral Psychology; Health & Safety Aspects of Computing; Human Computer Interaction; Human Performance Modelling; Social Aspects of Computing & IT; User Interface; Web Usability;

Formats available: HTML (English) : PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

3. Authors: James P. Guthrie a; Patrick C. Flood b; Wenchuan Liu c; Sarah MacCurtain

Publication Frequency: 12 issues per year

Published in: The International Journal of Human Resource Management, Volume 20, Issue 1 January 2009 , pages 112 - 125

Subject: Personnel and Human Resource Management;

Formats available: HTML (English) : PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

4. Authors: Laszlo A. Pook a; M. Ellen Pook; Jaacutenos Fuumlstoumls b (Show Biographies)

Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year

Published in: Journal of East-West Business, Volume 6, Issue 3 March 2001 , pages 93 - 110

Formats available: PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

5. Authors: Christian Korunka; Oliver Vitouch

Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year

Published in: Work & Stress, Volume 13, Issue 4 October 1999 , pages 341 - 363

Subjects: Behavioral Medicine; Health Psychology; Occupational/Industrial Health & Safety; Office & Workplace; Work & Organizational Psychology;

Formats available: PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

6. Authors: H. Wagner a; A. Dainty b; R. Hague a; C. Tuck a; M. H. Ong a

Publication Frequency: 24 issues per year

Published in: International Journal of Production Research, Volume 46, Issue 22 November 2008 , pages 6461 - 6478

First Published: November 2008

Subjects: Logistics; Manufacturing Engineering; Manufacturing Industries; Manufacturing Technology; Operations Management; Production & Quality Control Management; Production Research & Economics; Production Systems; Production Systems & Automation;

Formats available: HTML (English) : PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

7. Author: O. Joseph Akomode

Published in: Production Planning & Control, Volume 10, Issue 1 January 1999 , pages 35 - 47

Subjects: Engineering Project Management; Manufacturing Engineering; Operational Research; Operations Management; Production & Quality Control Management; Production Systems; Quality Control & Reliability;

8. Authors: A. Bhattacherjee a; C. Sanford b

b Department of MIS, College of Commerce, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan

Published in: Behaviour & Information Technology

First Published on: 29 January 2009

Subjects: Behavioral Psychology; Health & Safety Aspects of Computing; Human Computer Interaction; Human Performance Modelling; Social Aspects of Computing & IT; User Interface; Web Usability;

9. Authors: Hee “Andy” Lee a; Carolyn U. Lambert b

b Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Published in: Journal of Foodservice Business Research, Volume 11, Issue 4 December 2008 , pages 363 - 381

10. Authors: Ronald Graef a; Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi a; Susan McManama Gianinno a

Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year

Published in: Leisure Studies, Volume 2, Issue 2 1983 , pages 155 - 168

Subjects: Leisure Studies; Social Geography;

Formats available: PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

11. Authors: Urs E. Gattiker, Barbara A. Gutter ,Dale E. Berger

Publication Frequency: 3 issues per year

SUBJECT: Office Technology and Employee Attitudes

Published in: International Journal of Production Research, Volume 46, Issue 22

November 2006 , pages 461 - 478

First Published: November 2006

12. Author: Dale L. Goodhue

Information and decision sciences

University of Minnesota

Subject: Task Technology Fit and individual performance

Minneapolis. MN 55455

U.S.A

13. Authors: Erkko Autio a; Ilkka Kauranen a

Published in: Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Volume 6, Issue 4 October 1994 , pages 315 - 328

Subjects: Economic Geography; Entrepreneurship; Regional Geography - Human Geography;

14. Authors: Hee “Andy” Lee a; Carolyn U. Lambert b

Published in: Journal of Foodservice Business Research, Volume 11, Issue 4 December 2008 , pages 363 - 381

Subjects: Behavioral Psychology; Health & Safety Aspects of Computing; Human Computer Interaction; Human Performance Modelling; Social Aspects of Computing & IT; User Interface; Web Usability;

15.Authors: Laszlo A. Pook a; M. Ellen Pook; Jaacutenos Fuumlstoumls b (Show Biographies)

Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year

Published in: Journal of East-West Business, Volume 6, Issue 3 March 2001 , pages 93 - 110

Formats available: PDF (English)

Article Requests: Order Reprints : Request Permissions

http://www.informaworld.com

http://www.google.com

http://www.teamtechnology.co.uk/employee-motivation.html