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Referendum for Scottish Independence

Info: 1921 words (8 pages) Essay
Published: 3rd Oct 2017 in Politics

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The referendum for the Scottish independence will take place on the 18th of September 2014. This would most definitely lead to the breakup of the United Kingdom. There have been a series of arguments supporting the break up, and other not supporting the break up. The independence of Scotland is mainly supported by the Scottish National Party. According to this party, achieving independence from the United Kingdom is beneficial to Scotland, because the Scottish will be able to implement policies that are of great concern to them[1]. On this basis, Scotland will be able to achieve self-determination. The Scottish National Party believes that by achieving independence, the people of Scotland will be able to make the right policies, concerning their economy, and society at large. The Scottish National Party further believes that the government situated in Westminster is not a representation of the Scottish people, and this is because the many of the Scots did not vote for the government under consideration. Despite this factor, this government makes major decisions concerning issues that affect the Scottish families, and communities[2].

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The Scottish National Party finds this situation unacceptable. On this basis, proponents of independence argue that with an independent government, the country can focus on issues that affect the Scottish people, and also one that would protect the interests of the Scots, and anybody living in Scotland. Furthermore, the Scottish National Party believe that the policy initiated by the UK government reducing taxes on the wealthiest is not of the Interest of the Scots, and on this basis, it aims at reversing such laws, and initiating a universal tax system that would serve the entire Scottish population. However, there are counter arguments developed by people who are strongly opposed to the independence of Scotland[3]. One reason advanced is that a strong Scottish parliament, entrenched within the political structures of the United Kingdom enables Scotland to experience the very of both world. That is the ability to make decisions in Scotland, as well as the ability to play an important role in creating a secure and strong United Kingdom.

On this basis, people who do not support independence argue that Scotland is strong when it is entrenched withi8n the political structure of the United Kingdom and the United Kingdom is strong and secure with Scotland as its member. Furthermore, anti-independence proponents argue that important British institutions such as BBC and the Bank of England were created by Scotsmen[4]. On the other hand, the UK pension system was developed by a Briton, while the NHS was created by a Welsh man. On this basis, if the Scots and other members of the Kingdom work together, then chances are high that they would make the Kingdom a better place to stay. To accelerate the strength of the unity, the Scots, together with other members of the union fought together to destroy Nazism, fascism, and other ideologies that were a danger to the unity and prosperity of other members of the Kingdom. These proponents further argue that the Scots are justifying independence on the basis of protecting their social welfare and interests. However, this is difficult, when the Scots leave the British connection[5].

This is because chances are high that there will be barriers to trade, uncertainties, and political and economic instability. To protect themselves from these uncertainties, the best method is to maintain the British connection. This would ensure more prosperity, more jobs, and more economic growth in Scotland. Furthermore, the world is moving to regional integrations, and examples include ASEAN, and the European Union[6]. This therefore proves that states needs to corporate in the international system, and negotiate as one community, for purposes of protecting their interests. This would prove virtually be impossible if Scotland decides to gain independence. For instance gaining membership in the European Union is a very difficult process that normally takes so many years. Furthermore, the economy of UK is strong, stable, and very big. This is a very big advantage to various business organizations in Scotland, and this is because they can easily access this market, without facing any barriers. Furthermore, the Currency of the United Kingdom is the most successful and oldest in the world, and on this basis, it is a good currency for trading with[7].

These proponents further argue that it would be very difficult for Scottish organization to competitively conduct business in the international arena. This is because other countries are negotiating as a block, and on this basis, Scotland needs to be under the UK in order to compete effectively in these foreign markets. Under United Kingdom, Scottish businesses will be able to find new markets, and improve on their existing ones[8]. Scotland security will further be strong, and this is because they will be under the protection of the British armed forces. Lon this note, the Scots will have a say in the UN Security Council, as well as NATO. These anti-independence proponents further denote that Scotland and English have interacted with each other, for many years. This interaction amongst each other promotes multi-ethnicity, and it is therefore strength for Scotland. These proponents argue that thousand of Scots, and the English have intermarried with each other, they have formed families, and are neighbors. On this basis, voting for independence is not a wise decision, and this is because the disadvantages of independence outweigh the advantages of independence[9].

In conclusion, Scotland should not vote for independence. This is because the arguments brought forth by the Scottish National Party are not sincere. For instance, the British political system is democratic, and everybody is responsible for electing the person they want. On this basis, the Scots also had a chance to participate in the elections and elect their representatives. Arguing that the government at Westminster is not representation is there undemocratic and not sincere. Furthermore, the decision to gain independence from UK is not wise, and this is because Scotland will lose many trading opportunities that they enjoyed while under the UK. This would make the economy of Scotland vulnerable to manipulations from the international community, and other powerful economies. On this basis, arguments brought forth by anti-independence proponents are valid.

Bibliography:

BBC News. “Salmond calls for independence referendum in 2014.” BBC News. BBC, 1 Oct.

2012. Web. 28 Apr. 2014. <http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-16478121>.

Crawford, R., Bannockburns: scottish independence and the literary imagination, 1314-2014..

S.l.: Edinburgh Univ Press, 2014. Print.

Gordts, E., “Scotland’s Secession Vote: Indecisive Independence.” The Huffington Post.

TheHuffingtonPost.com, 5 Sept. 2013. Web. 28 Apr. 2014.

<http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/05/scotland-secession–

vote_n_3876007.html>.

Market, J., The economic implications for the United Kingdom of Scottish Independence: 2nd

report of session 2012-13. London: The Stationery Office, 2013. Print.

Saunders, B., “Scottish Independence and the All-Affected Interests Principle.” Politics 33.1

(2013): 47-55. Print.

     

[1] J, Market., The economic implications for the United Kingdom of Scottish Independence: 2nd report of session 2012-13. London: The Stationery Office, 2013. P. 44

[2] B, Saunders., “Scottish Independence and the All-Affected Interests Principle.” Politics 33.1 (2013): 49

[3] J, Market., The economic implications for the United Kingdom of Scottish Independence: 2nd report of session 2012-13. London: The Stationery Office, 2013. P. 32

[4] BBC News. “Salmond calls for independence referendum in 2014.” BBC News. BBC, 1 Oct. 2012. Web. 28 Apr. 2014. <http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-16478121>. P. 7

[5] BBC News. “Salmond calls for independence referendum in 2014.” BBC News. BBC, 1 Oct. 2012. Web. 28 Apr. 2014. <http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-16478121>. P. 4

[6] E, Gordts., “Scotland’s Secession Vote: Indecisive Independence.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 5 Sept. 2013. Web. 28 Apr. 2014.<http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/05/scotland-secession–vote_n_3876007.html>. p. 6

[7] Saunders, B., “Scottish Independence and the All-Affected Interests Principle.” Politics 33.1 (2013): 51.

[8] R, Crawford., Bannockburns: scottish independence and the literary imagination, 1314-2014.. S.l.: Edinburgh Univ Press, 2014.

[9] E, Gordts., “Scotland’s Secession Vote: Indecisive Independence.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 5 Sept. 2013. Web. 28 Apr. 2014.<http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/05/scotland-secession–vote_n_3876007.html>. p. 8

 

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