Perfectionistic High Quality Conscious Consumer Marketing Essay

1029 words (4 pages) Essay

1st Jan 1970 Marketing Reference this

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Perfectionistic or high-quality conscious consumer searches carefully for the best quality in products or services and shopping more systematically (Sproles and Kendall, 1986). It could be related to Hofstede’s (2001) cultural dimension of power distance, which deals with inequality in prestige, wealth and power. People who are more concerned with hierarchy among people in society, and this may translate into a perception of hierarchy amongst products or services of varying quality, particularly if high quality is associated with people who hold higher positions in society. Therefore, cultures with higher power distance like Thais would be more likely to engage in the quality conscious decision-making style and spend more time on searching for higher quality products or services.

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2.4.3.2. Brand conscious, “price equals quality” consumer

Brand conscious decision-making measures a consumer’s orientation to buying the more expensive and well-known brands (Sproles & Kendall, 1986). They have positive attitudes toward department and specialty stores, where brand names and higher prices prevail. They also appear to prefer best selling, and receive more attention through advertising outlets.

Brand conscious refers to Hofstede’s (1980) cultural dimension of power distance and uncertainty avoidance. Eastern cultures having high power distance, perceive social status and prestige as important (Hofstede, 2001). So Asian consumers are higher brand conscious and expected to have a higher need to maintain prestige and status (Ho, 1976, Leo et al., 2005).

Brands help consumers to minimize effort and provide a sense of familiarity that reduces the risk involved in purchasing (Lehmenn and Winer, 1997) and appeals to consumers who have high uncertainty avoidance. Thus, Thais are more brand consciousness, as Thailand culture is high uncertainty avoidance.

2.4.3.3. Novelty/fashion consciousness consumer

Novelty/fashion consciousness is a characteristic that identifying consumers who appear to like new and innovative products to gain excitement from seeking out new things. It is also called innovative decision-making (McAlister and Pessemier, 1982) and is related to the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions of individualism, masculine, and long-term orientation. Novelty consciousness consumers were found to be long-term oriented (Steenkamp, Hofstede and Wedel, 1999), they possess variety-seeking tendencies due to the cultural assumption that choice is indicative of an act of self-expression (Kim and Droplet, 2003). Furthermore, novelty conscious consumers are more individualistic and masculine (Steenkamp et. al., 1999), so they less likely to be concerned with the image they act to others and they value new things. Thus, Thai people could be less Novelty/fashion conscious.

2.4.3.4. Recreational, hedonistic consumer

Recreation consciousness is a characteristic measuring the degree to which a consumer finds shopping is a pleasant, fun (Sproles and Kendall, 1986), curiosity and exploration (Scarpi and Dall’Olmo-Riley, 2006). Those who score lower tend to spend less time and energy shopping. According to Leo et. al (2005), there’s not different between eastern and western cultures on recreation consciousness. However, Noobanjong (2003) stated that Thai people are hedonism habitually.

2.4.3.5. Price consciousness, “value-for-money” consumer

Price conscious is a characteristic identifying a buyer’s “unwillingness” to pay a higher price for a product and/or “the exclusive focus” on paying low prices (Lichtenstein, Ridgway & Netemeyer, 1993, p. 235), that items are bought for less and thus, more material goods can be accumulated. Gong (2003) postulates that lower masculine orientated Chinese consumers have a lower price limit for value, compared to Westerners. Based on this, Thais are expected to record lower price for value because of their femininity culture (Hofstede, 2001, p.286). Thus, Thais are presumed high price conscious.

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2.4.3.6. Impulsive, careless consumer

Impulse buying identifying those unplanned purchases (Rook and Hoch, 1985), who tend to be unconcerned about how much they spend or about the “best buys”. Besides, Kacen and Lee (2002) found that consumers from collectivist societies engaged in less impulse buying than individualist consumers. Culture as Thailand that high in uncertainty avoidance and collectivist would expect to be less inclined to impulse buy.

2.4.3.7. Confused by over choice consumer

Consumers who perceive too many brands and stores from which to choose, and experience information overload in the market and have difficulty making decisions (Leo et. al., 2005, p. 41). Those who score higher on this dimension feel overwhelmed by many choices, whereas those who score lower are like to utilize information to make the best choice for them (Grable, Archuleta, and Nazarinia, 2011, p. 294).

According to Cowley (2002) and Nisbett (2003), people from high uncertainty avoidance cultures take a more holistic view of products on a broader contextual view, and less focused on specific objects. Furthermore, due to Thais’ collectivistic nature, they search more and rely on social networks for information. Cultures that score highly on the Hofstede (2001) dimension of uncertainty avoidance may feel stressed by the ambiguity that too many choices present.

2.4.3.8. Habitual, brand-loyal consumer

Brand loyal is a characteristic indicating consumers who have favorite brands and stores, and remain with their favourite brands or stores (Sproles and Kendall, 1986), which is consistent with Hofstede’s (2001) cultural dimension of uncertainty avoidance as uncertainty avoidance increases risk aversion (Yau, 1988; Lehmenn et. al., 1997). Consumers high in uncertainty avoidance such as Thais prefer to avoid uncertainty and are likely to use the familiarity of brands to reduce ambiguity. Thus Thais tend to more brand loyalty.

Perfectionistic or high-quality conscious consumer searches carefully for the best quality in products or services and shopping more systematically (Sproles and Kendall, 1986). It could be related to Hofstede’s (2001) cultural dimension of power distance, which deals with inequality in prestige, wealth and power. People who are more concerned with hierarchy among people in society, and this may translate into a perception of hierarchy amongst products or services of varying quality, particularly if high quality is associated with people who hold higher positions in society. Therefore, cultures with higher power distance like Thais would be more likely to engage in the quality conscious decision-making style and spend more time on searching for higher quality products or services.

2.4.3.2. Brand conscious, “price equals quality” consumer

Brand conscious decision-making measures a consumer’s orientation to buying the more expensive and well-known brands (Sproles & Kendall, 1986). They have positive attitudes toward department and specialty stores, where brand names and higher prices prevail. They also appear to prefer best selling, and receive more attention through advertising outlets.

Brand conscious refers to Hofstede’s (1980) cultural dimension of power distance and uncertainty avoidance. Eastern cultures having high power distance, perceive social status and prestige as important (Hofstede, 2001). So Asian consumers are higher brand conscious and expected to have a higher need to maintain prestige and status (Ho, 1976, Leo et al., 2005).

Brands help consumers to minimize effort and provide a sense of familiarity that reduces the risk involved in purchasing (Lehmenn and Winer, 1997) and appeals to consumers who have high uncertainty avoidance. Thus, Thais are more brand consciousness, as Thailand culture is high uncertainty avoidance.

2.4.3.3. Novelty/fashion consciousness consumer

Novelty/fashion consciousness is a characteristic that identifying consumers who appear to like new and innovative products to gain excitement from seeking out new things. It is also called innovative decision-making (McAlister and Pessemier, 1982) and is related to the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions of individualism, masculine, and long-term orientation. Novelty consciousness consumers were found to be long-term oriented (Steenkamp, Hofstede and Wedel, 1999), they possess variety-seeking tendencies due to the cultural assumption that choice is indicative of an act of self-expression (Kim and Droplet, 2003). Furthermore, novelty conscious consumers are more individualistic and masculine (Steenkamp et. al., 1999), so they less likely to be concerned with the image they act to others and they value new things. Thus, Thai people could be less Novelty/fashion conscious.

2.4.3.4. Recreational, hedonistic consumer

Recreation consciousness is a characteristic measuring the degree to which a consumer finds shopping is a pleasant, fun (Sproles and Kendall, 1986), curiosity and exploration (Scarpi and Dall’Olmo-Riley, 2006). Those who score lower tend to spend less time and energy shopping. According to Leo et. al (2005), there’s not different between eastern and western cultures on recreation consciousness. However, Noobanjong (2003) stated that Thai people are hedonism habitually.

2.4.3.5. Price consciousness, “value-for-money” consumer

Price conscious is a characteristic identifying a buyer’s “unwillingness” to pay a higher price for a product and/or “the exclusive focus” on paying low prices (Lichtenstein, Ridgway & Netemeyer, 1993, p. 235), that items are bought for less and thus, more material goods can be accumulated. Gong (2003) postulates that lower masculine orientated Chinese consumers have a lower price limit for value, compared to Westerners. Based on this, Thais are expected to record lower price for value because of their femininity culture (Hofstede, 2001, p.286). Thus, Thais are presumed high price conscious.

2.4.3.6. Impulsive, careless consumer

Impulse buying identifying those unplanned purchases (Rook and Hoch, 1985), who tend to be unconcerned about how much they spend or about the “best buys”. Besides, Kacen and Lee (2002) found that consumers from collectivist societies engaged in less impulse buying than individualist consumers. Culture as Thailand that high in uncertainty avoidance and collectivist would expect to be less inclined to impulse buy.

2.4.3.7. Confused by over choice consumer

Consumers who perceive too many brands and stores from which to choose, and experience information overload in the market and have difficulty making decisions (Leo et. al., 2005, p. 41). Those who score higher on this dimension feel overwhelmed by many choices, whereas those who score lower are like to utilize information to make the best choice for them (Grable, Archuleta, and Nazarinia, 2011, p. 294).

According to Cowley (2002) and Nisbett (2003), people from high uncertainty avoidance cultures take a more holistic view of products on a broader contextual view, and less focused on specific objects. Furthermore, due to Thais’ collectivistic nature, they search more and rely on social networks for information. Cultures that score highly on the Hofstede (2001) dimension of uncertainty avoidance may feel stressed by the ambiguity that too many choices present.

2.4.3.8. Habitual, brand-loyal consumer

Brand loyal is a characteristic indicating consumers who have favorite brands and stores, and remain with their favourite brands or stores (Sproles and Kendall, 1986), which is consistent with Hofstede’s (2001) cultural dimension of uncertainty avoidance as uncertainty avoidance increases risk aversion (Yau, 1988; Lehmenn et. al., 1997). Consumers high in uncertainty avoidance such as Thais prefer to avoid uncertainty and are likely to use the familiarity of brands to reduce ambiguity. Thus Thais tend to more brand loyalty.

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