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The Basics Of Opnet It

Paper Type: Free Essay Subject: Information Technology
Wordcount: 5313 words Published: 12th May 2017

Reference this

In this lab we have followed the instructions that were given in the tutorial from the help menu. We built two networks as the first network that which is having 30 nodes and an internet server those are connected with Optical Fibre cables, and the second network that is having 15 nodes and it was connected to the first network with Optical fibre as well. And we will observe the results like LOAD and DELAY for the first network and We will repeat the same after connecting the second network to the same router. And we can observe in the graphs.

Comparisons and review of the networks:

All the circuit is been built by placing two networks one in first floor and second in the other floor. And we can observe it in the graph clearly.

Figure 1 Both the networks in both first and second floors

By the below figure we can notice the delay and Load on the server. When it was not connected to the second network the DELAY and LOAD are as shown in the figure

Figure 2 Ethernet Delay (in sec) and Ethernet load (bits/sec) on the server node

When the delay is observed in the server there is considerable delay , because server can receive all these nodes at the same time but the nodes are above the limit then there is a chance of delay in the server.

Figure 3 This is the compared result of delay between First floor and expansion

When the delay is observed in the server there is LOAD, According to this analysis we can say that the distance increased in the network can increase the load . As well as the more number of nodes also increases the load on server.

Figure 5 this is the load (bit/sec) for First floor and expansion

Conclusion:

After this lab we can learn the basics of the OPNET IT GURU .I faced some problems with the terminology and with registration of the softwares whiles installing .This lab helped me in designing the small networks and linking them and comparing the results especially the load and delay

Lab 5_ATM

ASYNCHRONOUS TANSFER MODE

A Connection-Oriented, Cell-Switching Technology

Introduction:

The goal of this lab is to analyse and examine the effect of Asynchronous Transfer Mode ATM adaptation layers and service classes on the performance of the network. There are different layers such as AAL that will discuss in this lab and will provide five service classes that can give a lot of useful information.

Objective:

To examine the effect of Asynchronous Transfer Mode ATM. And provide QoS capabilities through its five service classes: CBR, VBR-rt, VBRnrt, ABR, and UBR. With CBR (constant bit rate). And support all sorts of services, including voice, video, and data by using ATM. To study how the choice of the adaptation layer as well as the service classes can affect the performance of the applications.

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Procedure:

As given in the manual create a new project after completing configured the network; initialized the network, configured the applications, followed by profiles were done. While in the subnets part first configure northeast subnet was completed and add remaining subnets was added. After that choose the statistics was tested and configure the simulation was fixed. Next duplicate the new scenario was duplicated and name it UBR_UBR. Finally run the simulation was run and the view results and analyse.

Figure 1 this the CBR_UBR scenario

Figure 2 this the design of north east subnet

Figure 3 & 4 indicate the run simulation.

Figure 3

Figure 4

View the Results

Figure 5 this is the voice diagram that indicate the different delay between the CBR and UBR

Questions and Answers

1) Analyse the result we obtained regarding the voice Packet Delay Variation time. Obtain the graphs that compare the Voice packet end-to-end delay, the Email download response time, and the FTP download response time for both scenarios. Comment on the results.

Sol

When we observe the voice packet delay variation in the above shown figure 5, it indicates the UBR makes delay for voice because of the service class as UBR is using for all applications for ATM Adaption layer AAL5 . While CBR is using AAL2 and we can observe a very smooth service. So we can say that CBR service class is good for Voice applications and UBR service class is good for EMAIL and FTP applications.

Figures 6, 7 & 8 show the graph which compares the Voice packet end-to-end delay ,the Email download response time, and the FTP download response time for both scenarios.

Figure 6 in Voice Packer End_ to End Delay (sec)

Figure 7 Email Download Response Time (sec)

Figure 8 the FTP Download Response Time (sec)

By the voice packet end to end indicates that the CBR service is having higher quality when compared to UBR service.

By Email download response time when compared responses from both the scenarios.

From FTP responses when observed UBR_UBR the responses are beter when compared to CBR_UBR scenario. So as stated before from his graphs UBR is good for Email and FTP but not good for Voice, CBR service is good for Voice.

2) Create another scenario as a duplicate of the CBR_UBR scenario. Name the new scenario Q2_CBR_ABR. In the new scenario you should use the ABR class of service for data, i.e., the FTP and Email applications in the data stations. Compare the performance of the CBR_ABR scenario with that of the CBR_UBR scenario.

Hints:

– To set ABR class of service to a node, assign ABR Only to its ATM Application Parameters attribute and ABR only (Per VC Queue) to its Queue Configuration (one of the ATM Parameters).

– For all switches in the network (total of 6 switches), configure the Max_Avail_BW of the ABR queue to be 100% and the Min_Guaran_BW to be 20%.

Sol

Figure 9, the delay variation for both CBR_UBR and Q2_CBR_ABR is similar that means ABR and CBR services are good quality service that uses for voice.

Figure 9 this diagram of voice that indicates the delay variation

Figure 10, the down load for CBR service is more than ABR service.

Figure 10 this is time average for email

Figure 11, CBR and ABR services are having same FTP download response time.

Figure 11 FTP

3) Edit the FTP application defined in the Applications node so that its File Size is twice the current size (i.e., make it 100000 bytes instead of 50000 bytes). Edit the EMAIL application defined in the Applications node so that its File Size is five times the current size (i.e., make it 10000 bytes instead of 2000 bytes). Study how this affects the voice application performance in both the CBR_UBR and UBR_UBR scenarios. (Hint: to answer this question, you might need to create duplicates of the CBR_UBR and UBR_UBR scenarios. Name the new scenarios Q3_CBR_UBR and Q3_UBR_UBR respectively.)

Sol:

When we decrease the size of the file the QoS will improve, as the traffic congestion will decrese as in fig.13 and 14, the delay of voice time variation is same and the time average voice packet end to end is also same. And we can say as the decreasing of packet size can decrease traffic congestion.

Figure 12

Figure 13

Figure 14

Concolusion:

After this lab analysing the of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and ATM adaption layers and service classes and their effect on the performance of the network. And it taught me how to deal with different layers like ATM adaption layers(AAL).

Laboratory_6 (RIP)

RIP: Routing Information Protocol

Objective: In this lab we can analyze and configure the Routing Information protocol. R.I.P

Overview: Router has to check the packets destination address and determine which output ports is the best choice to the address. By seeing the forwarding table router do the decision. And these algorithms are needed to build routing tables and the forwarding tables. Basic problem of the routing to find the lowest-cost path between two nodes,” Where the cost of a path equals to the sum of costs of all edges that make the path”. In this laboratory, we will build a network that utilizes RIP as its routing protocol. We will examine the routing tables generated in the routers, and also check that how RIPS is affected by link failures.

Procedure:

At the first the scenario named as NO_Failure was created.

Network was build by using ethernet4_ slip8_gtwy and 100BaseT_LAN objects along with bidirectional 100BaseT_LAN links.

After completion router configuration, remaining LANs were added.

Then the statistics were chosen to realize the performance of the RIP protocol.

Then simulation process was performed. The designed figure is given below :

Figure-1 RIP Network (No_Failure)

And we have to design a Failure scenario for that duplicate the of scenario 1, with inclusion of link node failure simulations as shown in figure-2.

Figure-2 Rip Network (Failure)

And after editing the attributes , which develop a link failure between Router 1 and Router 2. Then simulation process was performed.

Figure-3 Comparison of number of updates in failure and No_Failure scenario.

The above figures shows the number updates those are sent by the router to its routing table and when there is a failure to any other node connected to it as compared to the situation when there is no failure in any of the link.

From the obtained graphs we can observe that for NO_Failure the number of updates decrease from 13 to 4 with time by approximately , because the routing table has already gathered information about neighboring nodes and after that only the information is updated that means updates being sent are less. The scenario is similar for failure in starting, but with time when the router senses link failure it again starts updating information in it’s routing table, the intensity of which is a little bit less then the time when it sensed the failure.

RIP Trafic in No_Failure and Failure scenarios

Figure-4 Comparison of RIP traffic sent in Failure and NO_Failure.

Figure-5 Comparison for RIP sent traffic in failure and No Failure Scenarios.

The above two graphs shows the comparison of RIP sent traffic in Failure and No_failure scenario. The above graphs the first represents overlaid comparison and second one is stacked comparison. The failure introduced into the RIP system changes the traffic sent signals and also the traffic received signals.

Conclusion:

By observing the results we can say that both No_failure and Failure scenarios are having different results and as the time taken for updating the Routing Information protocol is more for Failure scenario compared to NO_Failure scenario .Because the system require acknowledgement and discard the packet and resend it that takes lots of time to updating

LAB 7_OSPF:

Open Shortest Path First

A Routing Protocol Based on the Link-State Algorithm

Introduction:

This lab lets us to know the working method of OSPF(Open Shortest Path First Protocol). By some analysis and steps in order to know more about this.

Aim:

To introduce the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol. And analyse the performance of the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol. Then set up a network that utilizes OSPF as its routing protocol. Analyse the routing tables generated in the routers. And observe how the resulting routes are affected by assigning areas and enabling load balancing.

Procedure:

By following the steps in the maual we can create the new project is done as we can see in the figure 1

Figure 1 create a new scinario

After Creating, Configure the Network, Initialize the Network, Configure the Link Costs, Traffic Demands and figure the Routing Protocol and Addresses were completed. After that Configure the Simulation was the obtained results of the run was put it in the figure 2 & 3.

Figure 2 run three simulation

Figure 3 the result of simulation

After getting the simulation result duplicate the present scenarios (Areas and Balanced Scenarios) and observe the results as shown in the figures 4,5&6

Results

Figure 4 No_Areas Scenario paths from router A to router C

Figure 5 No_Areas Scenario paths from router B to router H

Figure 6 Area scenario

Figure 7 the Balanced Scenario

Answer the Question

1) Explain why the Areas and Balanced scenarios result in different routes than those observed in the No_Areas scenario, for the same pair of routers.

Sol

As the A and C router link is created as a traffic congestion in No_Areas, the packets go to other shortest path A,D,E and C are smaller as compared to A and C. And the cost is also more for A and C when compared to A,D,E and C , those are like 15 for A,D,E and C and A and C is 20.By OSPF protocol the shortest path is chosen. As the loop back interface allows a server and client to communicate on same host by using TCp/Ip the traffic packets between router A and C in the Areas scenario are expanded ,the packet will pass through link router A and C.And as per the load building option the Path cost for A,C,E,G and H and path cost for B,A,D,F and H are equal, So the packet may choose any one.

2) Using the simulation log, examine the generated routing table in Router A for each of the three scenarios. Explain the values assigned to the Metric column of each route.

Hints:

– Refer to the View Results section in Lab 6 for information about examining the routing tables. You will need to set the global attribute IP Interface Addressing Mode to the value Auto Addressed/Export

and rerun the simulation.

– To determine the IP address information for all interfaces, you need to open the Generic Data File that contains the IP addresses and associated with the scenarios.

sol

No_Areas

Campus Network.RouterA,Campus Network.RouterC,163.64,0,RouterA –> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterA, Network.RouterA <-> RouterD,Campus Network.RouterD,Campus Network.RouterD <-> RouterE,Campus Network.RouterE,Campus Network.RouterE <-> RouterC

Campus Network.RouterB,Campus Network.RouterH,168.59,1,RouterB –> RouterH,Campus Network.RouterB,Campus Network.RouterC <-> RouterB,Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE <-> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE,Campus Network.RouterG <-> RouterE,Campus Network.RouterG,Campus Network.RouterH <-> RouterG

Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterA,169.09,2,RouterC –> RouterA,Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE <-> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE,Campus Network.RouterD <-> RouterE,Campus Network.RouterD,Campus Network.RouterA <-> RouterD

Campus

COMMON ROUTE TABLE snapshot for:

Router name: Campus Network. (Router A)

at time: 600.00 seconds

ROUTE TABLE contents:

Dest. Address Subnet Mask Next Hop Interface Name Metric Protocol Insertion Time

————— ————— ————— ————— —— ——– ————–

192.0.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.1 IF0 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.3.1 IF1 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.4.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.4.1 IF2 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.12.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.12.1 Loopback 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.3.2 IF1 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.11.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 35 OSPF 36.496

192.0.14.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.17.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.6.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.7.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.15.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.8.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 25 OSPF 36.496

192.0.19.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.9.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.16.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 5 OSPF 36.496

192.0.5.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.18.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

Areas scenario

Campus Network.RouterA,Campus Network.RouterC,163.64,0,RouterA –> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterA,Campus Network.RouterA <-> RouterC

Campus Network.RouterB,Campus Network.RouterH,168.59,1,RouterB –> RouterH,Campus Network.RouterB,Campus Network.RouterC <-> RouterB,Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE <-> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE,Campus Network.RouterG <-> RouterE,Campus Network.RouterG,Campus Network.RouterH <-> RouterG

Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterA,169.09,2,RouterC –> RouterA,Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE <-> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE,Campus Network.RouterD <-> RouterE,Campus Network.RouterD,Campus Network.RouterA <-> RouterD

COMMON ROUTE TABLE snapshot for:

Router name: Campus Network. Router A

at time: 600.00 seconds

ROUTE TABLE contents:

Dest. Address Subnet Mask Next Hop Interface Name Metric Protocol Insertion Time

————— ————— ————— ————— —— ——– ————–

192.0.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.1 IF0 0 Direct 0.000

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192.0.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.3.1 IF1 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.4.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.4.1 IF2 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.12.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.12.1 Loopback 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.16.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 5 OSPF 36.496

192.0.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.5.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.18.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.9.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.17.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.3.2 IF1 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.11.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.4.2 IF2 40 OSPF 36.496

192.0.3.2 IF1 40 OSPF 36.496

192.0.14.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.4.2 IF2 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.6.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.7.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.19.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.8.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 25 OSPF 36.496

192.0.15.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 39.238

Balanced scenario

Campus Network.RouterA,Campus Network.RouterC,163.64,0,RouterA –> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterA,Campus Network.RouterA <-> RouterD,Campus Network.RouterD,Campus Network.RouterD <-> RouterE,Campus Network.RouterE,Campus Network.RouterE <-> RouterC

Campus Network.RouterB,Campus Network.RouterH,168.59,1,RouterB –> RouterH,Campus Network.RouterB,Campus Network.RouterC <-> RouterB,Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE <-> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE,Campus Network.RouterG <-> RouterE,Campus Network.RouterG,Campus Network.RouterH <-> RouterG

Campus Network.RouterB,Campus Network.RouterH,168.59,1,RouterB –> RouterH,Campus Network.RouterB,Campus Network.RouterA <-> RouterB,Campus Network.RouterA,Campus Network.RouterA <-> RouterD,Campus Network.RouterD,Campus Network.RouterD <-> RouterF,Campus Network.RouterF,Campus Network.RouterF <-> RouterH

Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterA,169.09,2,RouterC –> RouterA,Campus Network.RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE <-> RouterC,Campus Network.RouterE,Campus Network.RouterD <-> RouterE,Campus Network.RouterD,Campus Network.RouterA <-> RouterD

COMMON ROUTE TABLE snapshot for:

Router name: Campus Network. Router A

at time: 600.00 seconds

ROUTE TABLE contents:

Dest. Address Subnet Mask Next Hop Interface Name Metric Protocol Insertion Time

————— ————— ————— ————— —— ——– ————–

192.0.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.1 IF0 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.3.1 IF1 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.4.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.4.1 IF2 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.12.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.12.1 Loopback 0 Direct 0.000

192.0.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.3.2 IF1 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.11.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 35 OSPF 36.496

192.0.14.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.17.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.6.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.7.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.15.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 20 OSPF 36.496

192.0.8.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 25 OSPF 36.496

192.0.19.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.9.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 15 OSPF 36.496

192.0.16.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 5 OSPF 36.496

192.0.5.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

192.0.18.0 255.255.255.0 192.0.1.2 IF0 10 OSPF 36.496

When we observe the tables both No_Area and Balanced are having same tables but they are different in Area scenario. And this occurs by some reasons like no traffic in between A and C and the area identifier ,the path will pass as per the identifier and table will be different .

3) OPNET allows you to examine the link-state database that is used by each router to build the directed graph of the network. Examine this database for Router A in the No_ Areas scenario. Show how Router A utilizes this database to create a map for the topology of the network and draw this map. (This is the map that will be used later by the router to create its routing table.)

Hints:

– To export the link-state database of a router, Edit the attributes of the router and set the Link State Database Export parameter (one of the OSPF Parameters, under Processes) to Once at End of Simulation.

– You will need to set the global attribute IP Interface Addressing Mode to the value Auto Addressed/Export. This will allow you to check the automatically assigned IP addresses to the interfaces of the network. (Refer to the notes of question 2 above.)

– After rerunning the simulation, you can check the link-state database by opening the simulation log (from the Results menu). The link-state database is available in Classes _ OSPF _ LSDB_Export.

Sol

No_Areas

Link State Database snapshot for:

Router Name: Router A

at time: 600.00

[Router Links Advertisements for Area 0.0.0.0]

Link state advertisement list size: 8

———————————-

LSA Type: Router Links, Link State ID: 192.0.12.1, Adv Router ID: 192.0.12.1 Sequence Number: 47, LSA Age: 3

LSA Timestamp: 22.687

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.12.1, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 0,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.16.1, Link Data: 192.0.1.1, Link Cost: 5,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.1.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 5,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.13.1, Link Data: 192.0.3.1, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.3.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.14.1, Link Data: 192.0.4.1, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.4.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 20,

LSA Type: Router Links, Link State ID: 192.0.13.1, Adv Router ID: 192.0.13.1 Sequence Number: 49, LSA Age: 3

LSA Timestamp: 24.149

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.13.1, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 0,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.12.1, Link Data: 192.0.3.2, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.3.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.14.1, Link Data: 192.0.11.1, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.11.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 20,

LSA Type: Router Links, Link State ID: 192.0.14.1, Adv Router ID: 192.0.14.1 Sequence Number: 50, LSA Age: 3

LSA Timestamp: 24.149

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.14.1, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 0,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.12.1, Link Data: 192.0.4.2, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.4.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.18.1, Link Data: 192.0.10.1, Link Cost: 5,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.10.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 5,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.13.1, Link Data: 192.0.11.2, Link Cost: 20,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.11.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 20,

LSA Type: Router Links, Link State ID: 192.0.17.1, Adv Router ID: 192.0.17.1 Sequence Number: 52, LSA Age: 4

LSA Timestamp: 24.239

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.17.1, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 0,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.16.1, Link Data: 192.0.2.2, Link Cost: 5,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.2.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 5,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.19.1, Link Data: 192.0.6.1, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.6.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.15.1, Link Data: 192.0.7.2, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.7.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 10,

LSA Type: Router Links, Link State ID: 192.0.15.1, Adv Router ID: 192.0.15.1 Sequence Number: 51, LSA Age: 5

LSA Timestamp: 24.239

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.15.1, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 0,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.17.1, Link Data: 192.0.7.1, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.7.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.19.1, Link Data: 192.0.8.1, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.8.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 10,

LSA Type: Router Links, Link State ID: 192.0.19.1, Adv Router ID: 192.0.19.1 Sequence Number: 129, LSA Age: 5

LSA Timestamp: 27.687

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.19.1, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 0,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.17.1, Link Data: 192.0.6.2, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.6.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.15.1, Link Data: 192.0.8.2, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.8.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 10,

Link Type: Point-To-Point, Link ID: 192.0.18.1, Link Data: 192.0.9.2, Link Cost: 5,

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.9.0, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 5,

LSA Type: Router Links, Link State ID: 192.0.16.1, Adv Router ID: 192.0.16.1 Sequence Number: 130, LSA Age: 3

LSA Timestamp: 27.688

Link Type: Stub Network, Link ID: 192.0.16.1, Link Data: 255.255.255.0, Link Cost: 0,

Link Type: Point-To-Po

 

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