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Georgian Victorian And Edwardian Times History Essay

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The Georgian period refers to jewellery made during the successive reigns of four king Georges who ruled Great Britain for over 100 years. Georgian jewellery was created throughout the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century. Much of the jewellery was designed in the very early throes of the industrial revolution, therefore it was entirely hand made by jewellers of incredible skill and patience who were given the time to perfect their craft. Each piece was unique which adds greatly to the charm and value. Themes were close to nature including birds, flowers, leaves, insects and feathers. Pieces were often encrusted with diamonds and gemstones. In this era the type of metal used took second place to the workmanship that went into the cutting by hand of the gemstones. Inevitably, Georgian jewellery is becoming increasingly more difficult to find as many of the great estates have already been auctioned off. As a result, Georgian jewellery is highly collectable around the world. Much exquisite Memento Mori or mourning jewellery is from this period.

Victorian [1837 - 1900] 

The Victorian period began with the Coronation of the barely 18 year old Queen Victoria in June 1837. The Industrial Revolution, now in full swing, led to the growth of the middle class who developed an insatiable desire for jewellery. Use of industrial processes, cheaper alloys, and stone substitutes lead to the development of paste or costume jewellery; however excellent craftsmanship, handed down from generation to generation, was still in abundance and wealthier patrons demanded the use of precious metals and stones as well as the superior artistic and technical work of the leading jewellers of the day. Today, the best pieces of Victorian jewellery are highly collectable and can command high prices. We hope to offer some fine examples of the era. It should not be overlooked that in 1837, the same year as Queen Victoria's coronation, Tiffany's was founded in New York, a firm which put America on the map in terms of exquisite jewellery.

Edwardian [1901 - 1914] 

When Queen Victoria died in 1901, her son Edward VII became king with the Princess of Wales, Alexandra as his queen. Rather like Princess Diana in the 1980's and up until her premature death in 1997, Alexandra was a trendsetter and influenced the fashion sense for the nation's females. Edwardian jewellery was less ornate than Victorian jewellery and focussed on the quality of the diamonds, therefore the settings were designed to enhance the lustre of the diamonds. Also the simple circular brooch, often stone set, is a typically Edwardian design. We will feature some stunning pieces of jewellery from this era.

Art Nouveau [1890- 1915]

Following the death of King Edward the VII in 1910, eras ceased to be defined by monarchies, and the inspiration for jewellery started to shift towards Paris. The Art nouveau period produced a wide variety of beautiful jewellery in terms of both design and craftsmanship. Themes remained close to nature and history and included flowers, scrolls, insects, figurines and fine enamels. While France dominated the Art nouveau movement of this period, Faberge of Russia was also creating some of the finest pieces of jewellery ever made in the form of Imperial Faberge eggs. The House of Fabergé made and continue to make fine objects ranging from silver tableware to jewellery.

Art Deco [1920 - 1935]

The Art Deco Period from 1920 -1935 has remained a firm favourite among certain collectors and is hugely popular. The end of World War l brought many changes in the social structure. New wealth emerged and there was a time honoured passion to purchase luxury jewellery.

Art Deco was inspired by the 1925 Paris Exposition des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes, although the term Art Deco did not come into popular use until after a major exhibition as recently as 1966. The Art Deco movement covers a wide and eclectic design style using elements of abstract design with aspects of Cubism, Russian Constructivism and Italian Futurism - with abstraction, distortion, and simplification, cubism and geometrical patterns.

Earrings  

Our superb collection of earrings encompasses pieces from all eras, including Georgian, Victorian, Art Deco, Edwardian, Art Nouveau, and modern Arts & Crafts. Earrings are set in a wide choice of precious metals such as platinum, gold and silver, encrusted with Diamonds, Emeralds, Rubies and Sapphires and Semi Precious gemstones; a breathtaking selection that caters to all tastes.

Necklaces

We stock a wide selection of exquisite necklaces of all designs from the Georgian, Victorian, Art Deco, Edwardian, Art Nouveau, Arts & Crafts, Retro period in platinum, gold and silver.

Bracelets

We also feature a breathtaking collection of bracelets and bangles in precious metals including gold and silver, set with precious and semi precious stones, from the 18th Century right up to modern day designs.

Pendants 

Tempus Suisse Jewellery has a simply stunning collection of pendants from all the important eras; several Georgian, Victorian, Art Deco, Edwardian, Art Nouveau creations right up to the present day. Many of these are encrusted with precious gems such a diamonds, sapphires, emeralds, rubies and semi precious stones.

Lockets

Amongst our collection of fine jewellery we also include a magnificent range of gold and silver lockets, from the Georgian and Victorian Period right up to the present day. Some of the lockets are set with diamonds and precious stones, some feature engravings, floral/bird motifs and intricate engraved workmanship.

Brooches

Our beautiful brooches are from the Georgian Period, right through to the present day, set in precious metals, some are set with diamonds, precious stones and semi precious stones.

Mourning

Mourning jewellery was worn by widows from the Middle Ages right through to the latter stages of the 19th century as a mark of respect for those who had passed on. Early mourning jewellery is notable for rings made of gold and black enamel and decorated with standard memento mori such as skulls, coffins and gravestones. The mourning jewellery industry reached its zenith in the Victorian era. Queen Victoria had strict rules governing dress and social behaviour in times of mourning which became even more strictly observed following the death of Prince Albert in 1861. With his demise, mourning dress was worn by a widow for a year and a day, followed by 9 months of half mourning. Symbols gradually became more romantic and imagery such as forget-me-nots, flowers, hearts, crosses, and ivy leaves, replaced the earlier symbols of skulls, coffins, and gravestones.

Cameos

We have a wonderful collection of mythological Cameos from the Georgian period right through to the 1880s. Our cameos feature exquisitely skilled carvings, high relief workmanship boasting the finest of carvings from the era, all delicately carved from shell and set within lavishly decorative frames.

Jet Jewellery

Jet as a gemstone was fashionable during the reign of Queen Victoria,

during which the Queen wore Whitby jet as part of her mourning dress.

Jet was associated with mourning jewellery in the 19th century because

of its sombre colour and modest appearance, and it has been

traditionally fashioned into rosaries for monks. In the United

States, long necklaces of jet beads were very popular during the

1920s, or Roaring Twenties, when women and young flappers would wear

multiple strands of jet beads stretching from the neckline to the

waistline. In these necklaces, the jet was strung using heavy cotton

thread; small knots were made on either side of each bead to keep the

beads spaced evenly, much in the same way that fine pearl necklaces

are made. Jet has also been known as black amber, as it may induce an

electric charge like that of amber when rubbed.

Skull

Skull jewellery (memento mori) is very collectable. Memento mori means

remember that you must die and to cherish each day as it is a reminder

of the imminence of death and the hazards of life during the 17thC.

Memento mori jewellery was decorated with skulls, crossbones, skeletons,

coffins, and worms which all seems very macabre to us today.

Serpents

Serpent jewellery became popular during the early years of Queen

Victorians reign coincided with the full flowering of the Romantic

Movement, and no one was more passionate or romantic than the queen,

nature provided the inspiration to jewellers, leaves, buds, flowers,

twigs, bunches of grapes and serpents twined freely and charmingly over

bracelets, rings earrings and brooches.

Snake

Snake rings also became popular when after Prince Albert presented Queen

Victoria with a snake engagement ring in 1839.

Watches

A collection of watches that are decorative set in high ct gold,

platinum or silver, and have beautiful workmanship, all in good working

order.

Suites/sets

A collection of beautiful sets/suites that comprise of usually

ring/earrings or necklace. Occasionally we get Demi Parure that we will

also list in this section, this is the full suite of usually 4/5 items,

today they are increasingly collectable as over the centuries items have

been split through generations, so find sets is increasingly

collectable.

Other finds

Other interesting collectables we find on our way, as we search for

fabulous Antique jewellery and small collectables, enjoy the website and

I look forward to your business and for you to treasure your very

special collectable jewellery that you can pass through your own

generations. 


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