Child Language Disorder Factors and Treatments

1655 words (7 pages) Essay

5th Sep 2017 Health Reference this

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What is Language Disorder?

Difficulties associated with communication can be identified as language disorder. Child language disorder can be classified by language production skills that are lower than the age-appropriate level, which can be seen if the child is behind their peers in their progress of language skills. A language disorder is defined as the inability to utilise words to express thoughts (expressive language) and/or understand (receptive language). Expressive language disorder disturbs the child’s written and oral language, which validates age-appropriate understanding of language. On the other hand, receptive language can be witnessed when the child is unable to comprehend language at an expected level and comprise complications with being able to answer questions, follow directions as well as understand words and sentences. There is also a possibility where the child can have expressive and receptive language disorder, which can be characterised by the complications with comprehension as well as production of language.

Exchange, C. (2017). Language Disorders (Child Language Disorders) | International Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation. Cirrie.buffalo.edu. Retrieved 16 March 2017, from http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/encyclopedia/en/article/31/

What is Language Disorder?

Children diagnosed with language disorder are unable to:

  • Use the precise grammar when speaking or writing
  • Send the correct message to others when they are trying to communicate
  • Identify the variances between likenesses and differences
  • Breakdown words into sounds and syllables
  • Recognize pronouns
  • To repeat what happened in a story in order
  • Start conversations
  • Understand what others are saying through their facial expressions and body language
  • Use gestures when speaking

Exchange, C. (2017). Language Disorders (Child Language Disorders) | International Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation. Cirrie.buffalo.edu. Retrieved 16 March 2017, from http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/encyclopedia/en/article/31/

Speech Pathologist’s role

The first significant stage in understanding the children’s language requirements and strengths is comprehensive assessment. Expressive and receptive language, stuttering and phonological awareness are some of the areas that are assessed. Speech therapists can tailor suitable interventions appropriate to the children’s learning style and deliver beneficial tactics for the home and school environment. Whereas the screening assessment is utilised to deliver an effective way of detecting children who may be diagnosed of language disorders. Speech pathologists work cooperatively with a crew that involves parents caregivers and educational professionals (i.e. educators, teachers, and psychologists).

Language-Based Learning Disabilities (Reading, Spelling, and Writing). (2017). Asha.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/LBLD.htm

Rosenbaum, S., Simon, P., Disorders, C., Populations, B., Board on Children, a., & Medicine, I. et al. (2017). Treatment and Persistence of Speech and Language Disorders in Children. Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK356271/

Speech Pathologist’s role

The role of a speech pathologists in working with pre-school children:

  • Collect some information about the experience of literacy at home (are there any books or reading materials around the house? How often does the child witness their family members read or write?).
  • Observe the children throughout their classroom activities.
  • Assess if the child is able to comprehend directions.
  • Observe if the child is able to recognise signs and is they can write their name.
  • Determine if the child is able to tap out the different syllables in words.

The role of a speech pathologists in working with older children:

  • Assess if the student can read and comprehend information in books.
  • Observe if the students can play with and hear sounds in words.
  • Help the students connect syllable and sounds to form a word.
  • Observe the child’s memory by having them repeat words and numbers.

Speech pathologist’s role is to prevent communication disorders by working cooperatively with family members and education professionals to diagnose children and help them to communicate with others and express their thoughts and feelings in words.

Language-Based Learning Disabilities (Reading, Spelling, and Writing). (2017). Asha.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/LBLD.htm

Rosenbaum, S., Simon, P., Disorders, C., Populations, B., Board on Children, a., & Medicine, I. et al. (2017). Treatment and Persistence of Speech and Language Disorders in Children. Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK356271/

Impact on daily life

Studies and research revealed that diagnosis on its own will not predict functional outcomes, length of hospitalisation, service needs and level of care. Therefore, relying on medical classification of diagnoses alone we will not provide the information that is required for health arrangement and management purposes. ICF is able to assemble those essential data in a reliable and internationally comparable manner.

4 Ways Language Disorders Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life. (2017). Understood.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/communication-disorders/4-wayslanguage-disorders-can-affect-your-childs-social-life

Language Disorders – OTFC. (2017). OTFC. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://occupationaltherapychildren.com.au/we-have-skills/my-childs-condition/language-disorders/

Impact on daily life- case scenario

James, a seven-year-old, is diagnosed with Aphasia was referred to a speech pathologists by his parents during second grade, as well as receiving speech therapy at his public school. He began speaking at the age of three, which is below the age-appropriate level. Throughout kindergarten to second grade, he was consistently making grammar mistakes (referring to both females and males with the pronoun “he” and misusing past tenses of verbs). Furthermore, James had an issue with precisely articulating his thoughts and feelings to form accurate words and phrases. This had a significant impact on his word retrieval, organising his thoughts and choosing precise words to form sentences to express his intentions. In response to that issue, he experienced difficulties at school with spelling and reading comprehension. It gradually began to affect his social life as he found it difficult to understand the rules of polite conversation. Additionally due to him being literal-minded, he had difficulties interpreting tone of voice and furthermore became shy due to his inability to express his thoughts into words. His speech pathologists and parents work cooperatively to diagnose, support and motivate him to deal with the issue in a positive way and ensure that he is able to work through these issue in the correct manner.

4 Ways Language Disorders Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life. (2017). Understood.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/communicationdisorders/4-ways-language-disorders-can-affect-your-childs-social-life

Language Disorders – OTFC. (2017). OTFC. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://occupationaltherapychildren.com.au/we-have-skills/my-childs-condition/language-disorders/

Bibliograpgy

References

4 Ways Language Disorders Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life. (2017). Understood.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learningdisabilities/communication-disorders/4-ways-language-disorders-can-affect-your-childs-social-life

(2017). Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwja9L2E4fPSAhUP82MKHeuzBTAQ_AUIBigB&biw=1094&bih=645#tbm=isc h&q=child+language+disorder+and+speech+pathologist&*&imgrc=hf6KDI5yzjNOsM: child language disorder – Google Search. (2017). Google.com.au. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.google.com.au/search?q=child+language+disorder&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved= 0ahUKEwja9L2E4fPSAhUP82MKHeuzBTAQ_AUIBigB&biw=1094&bih=645#tbm=isch&q=child+language+d isorder+and+speech+pathologist&*&imgrc=hf6KDI5yzjNOsM

Exchange, C. (2017). Language Disorders (Child Language Disorders) | International Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation. Cirrie.buffalo.edu. Retrieved 16 March 2017, from http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/encyclopedia/en/article/31/

Language Disorders – OTFC. (2017). OTFC. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://occupationaltherapychildren.com.au/we-have-skills/my-childs-condition/language-disorders/

Language-Based Learning Disabilities (Reading, Spelling, and Writing). (2017). Asha.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/LBLD.htm

Rosenbaum, S., Simon, P., Disorders, C., Populations, B., Board on Children, a., & Medicine, I. et al. (2017). Treatment and Persistence of Speech and Language Disorders in Children. Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK356271/

What is Language Disorder?

Difficulties associated with communication can be identified as language disorder. Child language disorder can be classified by language production skills that are lower than the age-appropriate level, which can be seen if the child is behind their peers in their progress of language skills. A language disorder is defined as the inability to utilise words to express thoughts (expressive language) and/or understand (receptive language). Expressive language disorder disturbs the child’s written and oral language, which validates age-appropriate understanding of language. On the other hand, receptive language can be witnessed when the child is unable to comprehend language at an expected level and comprise complications with being able to answer questions, follow directions as well as understand words and sentences. There is also a possibility where the child can have expressive and receptive language disorder, which can be characterised by the complications with comprehension as well as production of language.

Exchange, C. (2017). Language Disorders (Child Language Disorders) | International Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation. Cirrie.buffalo.edu. Retrieved 16 March 2017, from http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/encyclopedia/en/article/31/

What is Language Disorder?

Children diagnosed with language disorder are unable to:

  • Use the precise grammar when speaking or writing
  • Send the correct message to others when they are trying to communicate
  • Identify the variances between likenesses and differences
  • Breakdown words into sounds and syllables
  • Recognize pronouns
  • To repeat what happened in a story in order
  • Start conversations
  • Understand what others are saying through their facial expressions and body language
  • Use gestures when speaking

Exchange, C. (2017). Language Disorders (Child Language Disorders) | International Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation. Cirrie.buffalo.edu. Retrieved 16 March 2017, from http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/encyclopedia/en/article/31/

Speech Pathologist’s role

The first significant stage in understanding the children’s language requirements and strengths is comprehensive assessment. Expressive and receptive language, stuttering and phonological awareness are some of the areas that are assessed. Speech therapists can tailor suitable interventions appropriate to the children’s learning style and deliver beneficial tactics for the home and school environment. Whereas the screening assessment is utilised to deliver an effective way of detecting children who may be diagnosed of language disorders. Speech pathologists work cooperatively with a crew that involves parents caregivers and educational professionals (i.e. educators, teachers, and psychologists).

Language-Based Learning Disabilities (Reading, Spelling, and Writing). (2017). Asha.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/LBLD.htm

Rosenbaum, S., Simon, P., Disorders, C., Populations, B., Board on Children, a., & Medicine, I. et al. (2017). Treatment and Persistence of Speech and Language Disorders in Children. Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK356271/

Speech Pathologist’s role

The role of a speech pathologists in working with pre-school children:

  • Collect some information about the experience of literacy at home (are there any books or reading materials around the house? How often does the child witness their family members read or write?).
  • Observe the children throughout their classroom activities.
  • Assess if the child is able to comprehend directions.
  • Observe if the child is able to recognise signs and is they can write their name.
  • Determine if the child is able to tap out the different syllables in words.

The role of a speech pathologists in working with older children:

  • Assess if the student can read and comprehend information in books.
  • Observe if the students can play with and hear sounds in words.
  • Help the students connect syllable and sounds to form a word.
  • Observe the child’s memory by having them repeat words and numbers.

Speech pathologist’s role is to prevent communication disorders by working cooperatively with family members and education professionals to diagnose children and help them to communicate with others and express their thoughts and feelings in words.

Language-Based Learning Disabilities (Reading, Spelling, and Writing). (2017). Asha.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/LBLD.htm

Rosenbaum, S., Simon, P., Disorders, C., Populations, B., Board on Children, a., & Medicine, I. et al. (2017). Treatment and Persistence of Speech and Language Disorders in Children. Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK356271/

Impact on daily life

Studies and research revealed that diagnosis on its own will not predict functional outcomes, length of hospitalisation, service needs and level of care. Therefore, relying on medical classification of diagnoses alone we will not provide the information that is required for health arrangement and management purposes. ICF is able to assemble those essential data in a reliable and internationally comparable manner.

4 Ways Language Disorders Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life. (2017). Understood.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/communication-disorders/4-wayslanguage-disorders-can-affect-your-childs-social-life

Language Disorders – OTFC. (2017). OTFC. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://occupationaltherapychildren.com.au/we-have-skills/my-childs-condition/language-disorders/

Impact on daily life- case scenario

James, a seven-year-old, is diagnosed with Aphasia was referred to a speech pathologists by his parents during second grade, as well as receiving speech therapy at his public school. He began speaking at the age of three, which is below the age-appropriate level. Throughout kindergarten to second grade, he was consistently making grammar mistakes (referring to both females and males with the pronoun “he” and misusing past tenses of verbs). Furthermore, James had an issue with precisely articulating his thoughts and feelings to form accurate words and phrases. This had a significant impact on his word retrieval, organising his thoughts and choosing precise words to form sentences to express his intentions. In response to that issue, he experienced difficulties at school with spelling and reading comprehension. It gradually began to affect his social life as he found it difficult to understand the rules of polite conversation. Additionally due to him being literal-minded, he had difficulties interpreting tone of voice and furthermore became shy due to his inability to express his thoughts into words. His speech pathologists and parents work cooperatively to diagnose, support and motivate him to deal with the issue in a positive way and ensure that he is able to work through these issue in the correct manner.

4 Ways Language Disorders Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life. (2017). Understood.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/communicationdisorders/4-ways-language-disorders-can-affect-your-childs-social-life

Language Disorders – OTFC. (2017). OTFC. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://occupationaltherapychildren.com.au/we-have-skills/my-childs-condition/language-disorders/

Bibliograpgy

References

4 Ways Language Disorders Can Affect Your Child’s Social Life. (2017). Understood.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learningdisabilities/communication-disorders/4-ways-language-disorders-can-affect-your-childs-social-life

(2017). Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwja9L2E4fPSAhUP82MKHeuzBTAQ_AUIBigB&biw=1094&bih=645#tbm=isc h&q=child+language+disorder+and+speech+pathologist&*&imgrc=hf6KDI5yzjNOsM: child language disorder – Google Search. (2017). Google.com.au. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.google.com.au/search?q=child+language+disorder&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved= 0ahUKEwja9L2E4fPSAhUP82MKHeuzBTAQ_AUIBigB&biw=1094&bih=645#tbm=isch&q=child+language+d isorder+and+speech+pathologist&*&imgrc=hf6KDI5yzjNOsM

Exchange, C. (2017). Language Disorders (Child Language Disorders) | International Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation. Cirrie.buffalo.edu. Retrieved 16 March 2017, from http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/encyclopedia/en/article/31/

Language Disorders – OTFC. (2017). OTFC. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://occupationaltherapychildren.com.au/we-have-skills/my-childs-condition/language-disorders/

Language-Based Learning Disabilities (Reading, Spelling, and Writing). (2017). Asha.org. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/LBLD.htm

Rosenbaum, S., Simon, P., Disorders, C., Populations, B., Board on Children, a., & Medicine, I. et al. (2017). Treatment and Persistence of Speech and Language Disorders in Children. Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

Retrieved 26 March 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK356271/

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