Birth Control: History, Methods and Issues

5503 words (22 pages) Essay

23rd Jan 2018 Health Reference this

Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a university student. This is not an example of the work produced by our Essay Writing Service. You can view samples of our professional work here.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UKEssays.com.

David

Birth Control

Introduction

How amazing would it be if we lived in a utopia where people can choose whether or not to get pregnant after unprotected sex and have no Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD). Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD) are diseases that has a high chance to be transmitted between humans by sexual intercourse, such as but not limited to: “vaginal intercourse, anal sex, oral sex, etc.”[1] Well unfortunately there is no utopia. But we have birth control methods that can prevent pregnancy and Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD). Birth control is the practice of preventing a woman from getting pregnant.[2] Birth control is an issue in society that needs more attention, simply because it leads to more problems such as: “teen pregnancy, abortion, overpopulation, STD, etc.”

History of Birth Control

Birth control was first used in the 1550 B.C by an Egyptian manuscript called the Ebers Papyrus. It gives women directions on how to mix dates, acacia and honey into a paste, spread it over the vagina and use it to prevent pregnancy. [3]

In the 1700s, the first condoms were being experimented. It ranged from sheep-bladder condoms to the use of half a lemon as a makeshift cervical cap. [4]

The first ever rubber condoms were invented in 1839 by Charles Goodyear. In 1873, United States of America is the only Western nation to criminalize contraception. During the 1800s a large cervical cap in developed.[5]

Get Help With Your Essay

If you need assistance with writing your essay, our professional essay writing service is here to help!

Find out more

In 1954, John Rock conducted the first ever birth control pill and tested it on 50 women. In 1960 the FDA approved the use of birth control pills but little do they know that almost half a million U.S women are already using it.[6]

Now we have more advanced birth control methods. More and more people are using birth control to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

Methods of Birth Control

In the world today there are various ways to prevent pregnancy and a lot of them are very effective and safe. From sheep bladder condoms to super thin latex condoms. We see that as ass technology is improving, birth control methods are getting more and more advanced at the same time. There are birth control methods that are “natural” and do not involve any pills, condoms, and etc.

Abstinence is a natural birth control method, this is a method that doesn’t involve having sex with a partner. Couples may enjoy other types of sexual activities that do not lead to the female getting pregnant.[7] This method is 100% effective and safe because there is no interaction between a penis and a vagina. Similarly to abstinence outercourse is also a natural birth control method. Outercourse includes any kind of sexual activity that doesn’t involve vaginal intercourse and penetration.[8] It is also 100% effective and safe because it doesn’t involve any interaction between a penis and a vagina. The withdrawal (pull out) method in the other hand is a natural birth control method that involve sexual intercourse. A man will pull his penis out of the vagina before ejaculation. Ejaculation is when the semen spurts out of the penis.[9] This method can prevent pregnancy but has the risk to be diagnosed with Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD).

There are various birth control methods that involve the use of pills, substances, and objects. Birth control pills are well known throughout the world. There are many types of birth control pills, some are effective and some are not. A birth control pill prevents the egg from leaving the ovaries. It makes the cervical mucus thicker so the sperm is blocked and can’t make contact with the egg.[10] There is another kind of birth control pill but this one is for emergency use. It is called the morning after pill. After having unprotected sex, within this 5 days taking this emergency birth control pill will prevent pregnancy. It can take up to six days for the sperm and egg to meet after having sex so this pill can prevent pregnancy. This pill keeps the woman’s ovary from releasing egg for longer than usual.[11]

Condoms are made of thin latex or plastic that has been shaped like a penis. During sexual intercourse it is worn on the penis. Condoms can prevent pregnancy and lower the risk of getting Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD). When a man ejaculates the condom collects the semen so it prevents the sperm entering the vagina.[12] There are also condoms for women. It works exactly the same as the condom worn by men, it collects the semen and prevents it entering the vagina. The female condom is inserted deep inside the vagina. The ring at the closed end holds the pouch in the vagina to block the semen entering the vagina. The ring at the open end stays outside the vaginal opening during intercourse where the man inserts his penis in.[13]

There are objects that is inserted into the women’s vagina to prevent pregnancy when no condom is used during sexual intercourse. They all have similarities in use. Some of them contain spermicide. Spermicide has chemicals that can stop a sperm from moving to prevent it from joining with the egg.[14] For example, the birth control sponge contains spermicide. It is soft, round, and two inch in diameter. It is made out of plastic foam.[15] Before sexaul intercourse, the birth control sponge is inserted deep inside the woman’s vagina. When the man ejaculates in the vagina, the sperm will be blocked by the birth control sponge.[16] And will be absorbed by the sponge. The diaphragm is a dome-shaped cup with a flexible rim.[17] It is made out of silicone and it is placed on the cervix to block the opening of the uterus.[18] The spermicide stops the sperm from moving so fertilization is not going to happen.

There are some that don’t have spermicide. For example, the cervical cap. The cervical cap is a silicone cup that has a shape of a sailor’s hat.[19] Woman inserts it into their vagina and over their cervix. [20]The cervical cap blocks the uterus from opening so the sperm is unable to fertilize the egg.[21]

There are birth control methods where hormones (Estrogen) are released into the body that prevents pregnancy. The birth control implant is a thin, flexible plastic implant about the size of a matchstick.[22] It is inserted under the skin of the upper arm. [23]It can prevent pregnancy for 3 three years. [24]Estrogen is released which prevents pregnancy. The birth control patch is similar to the birth control implant. It also releases estrogen into the body. But the birth control patch is a thin plastic patch that sticks to the skin like a bandage.[25] Once a week the patch has to be replaced by a new patch for three weeks then there will be a patch free week.[26] The birth control shot is an injection of hormones (Progestin) into the body to prevent pregnancy. Each shot prevents pregnancy for three months.[27]

We see that there are mostly birth control methods for females. Males only wear condoms to prevent pregnancy. So now people are starting to develop male birth controls. A new male birth control method is being developed. It is called Vasalgel; it is an injection not a pill. It blocks the tube where the sperm swim through from the testicle.[28] A man can have unprotected sex and won’t ejaculate. However, the injection has to be taken just above the testicles.[29] The Vasalgel is still in its early stages of development, it has only been tested on baboons and rabbits.[30] No human being has ever tried it yet. The price is not yet set, but the Foundation noted that Vasalgel is not more than $800. In other words, if you can afford an iPhone 6, you can definitely afford this new male birth control.[31]

Birth control comes with side effects too. Mainly the hormone-based birth control often comes with side effects that can range from little annoying to the point where you get fired up.[32] The birth control that involves inserting objects into a woman’s vagina has side effects such as vaginal infection.[33]

The birth control pill can cause headaches, dizziness, and breast tenderness. According to Hilda Hutcherson, MD, an ob-gyn professor at Columbia University.[34] These side effects will go away after taking the pill for a while.[35]

Nausea is mainly caused by the birth control patch.[36] According to Hilda Hutcherson, MD, an ob-gyn professor at Columbia University. Switching to oral birth control methods can help decrease nausea.[37]

Decreased sexual desire is caused by the birth control pill.[38] According to Hilda Hutcherson, MD, an ob-gyn professor at Columbia University. Switching to other types of birth control pills may help but if not change to other methods.[39]

Mood swings are caused by hormonal birth control methods.[40] Changing to nonhormal methods will help decrease mood swings.[41] All hormonal methods are likely to cause mood swings.[42]

Family Planning in Thailand

Since Thailand is a buddhist country birth control pills and condoms are the more preferable and acceptable methods.[43] Condoms are favourites among Thais. Because condoms don’t just prevent pregnancy but also prevents STDs.[44] According to Mechai Viravaidya, a politician in Thailand, “the Buddhist scriptures say that many births cause suffering, so Buddhism is not against birth control. And we even end up with monks sprinkling holy water on pills and condoms for the sanctity of the family before products went out into the villages.”[45] Mechai has been known as “Mr.Condom” in Thailand.[46] He brought awareness to condoms, birth control, and AIDS. Before he would giveaway condoms every valentines day.[47]From the time he began his campaign, the average number of children in Thai families has decreased from 7 to 1.5.[48] We can see that the number decreased dramatically. This is one of the reasons why Thailand is not overpopulated.

Birth Control in China

China has the most population in the world 1,366,990,000.[49] It takes up 19% of the world’s total population.[50] In the 1970s China’s population was growing tremendously. Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping established a policy called One Child policy in 1979 to limit China’s population growth.[51] This policy limits couples to one child.

It is well known that those who violate the policy have sometimes been subjected to abortions.[52] If they already gave birth, they are forced to pay fines and have been sterilized.[53] Which means they are unable to give birth for the rest of their lives.

A lot of people have been questioning whether or not this policy can reduce the growth of China’s population. A study taken by the University of California in April 2007, found that the policy is very effective and reduces the fertility rate in China. After the announcement of the one-child policy, the fertility rate in China dropped from 2.63 births per woman in 1980 (already a sharp reduction from more than five births per woman in the early 1970s) to 1.61 in 2009.

The Chinese government didn’t directly inform people to use birth control. By having the one-child policy, the Chinese people are very well aware that they must use birth control to prevent breaking the law.

Different Views on Birth Control

Different religions have different views on birth control. Some are against it and some support it. Even some religion changed their view on birth control over time. Until the 20th century birth control was not approved by Christianity. It was seen as a barrier to God’s procreative purpose of marriage.[54] In Judaism, Orthodox rabbis believe that making babies is a male duty. But many rabbis allow birth control cases because pregnancy can seriously harm the woman.[55] Conservative and Reform Jews however feel that birth control have benefits, such as family stability, disease prevention, and less stress, etc.[56] Hinduism encourages reproduction within marriage, but there is appeal against birth control.[57] Most Hindus accept that there is a duty to have a family during a person’s lifetime. So they are unlikely to use birth control to prevent having children.[58] In Hinduism people are encouraged to make more babies. In Islam, birth control is encouraged to youngsters and married couples. Birth control is supported because of economic reasons and the health of the woman. Also it will make the marriage more fun.[59]

UDHR

Birth control is related to article 16: Marriage and Family in the United Declaration of Human Rights. Every adult has the right to marry and have kids if they want to[60]. Every single person has the right to use birth control or not. It’s their own decision whether or not to want to have a baby and how many babies they want. Nothing can stop you from preventing pregnancy or getting pregnant.

Conclusion

Birth control is an issue that hasn’t really been recognized by the society. Birth control is a very serious issue since it can lead to more problems such as: “teen pregnancy, abortion, overpopulation, STD, etc.” As we can see India’s population is growing tremendously quick. By 2030, India will surpass China and be the world’s most populated country.[61] India does not have the One-Child policy and poor people do not have access to birth control pills or other kind of methods.

Find out how UKEssays.com can help you!

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

View our services

I think that right now there are too less male birth control methods. Vasalgel is being developed but seeing that it is an injection right above the testicals scares a lot of men. Also it hasn’t been tested on a human yet. In my opinion researchers should develop some type of pill that can stop the tube that the sperm swims through from the testicle. More people will buy it because it is safer than an injection.

I think condoms are the safest and most effective method. It can definitely prevent pregnancy and also prevent STDs. No direct contact is being made between the penis and vagina so no STDs can be transferred. People complain that it doesn’t feel as good as unprotected sex. But unprotected sex can kill you, on the other hand condom is there to prevent you from dying.

The One-Child policy helped China stabilize their population growth. I believe India should have this policy too because the population of India is increasing dramatically. If it is not stopped it can affect India’s economy and their will be a high demand of goods and not enough supply. By limiting one child per family the population growth will slow down a lot and the country can improve different things.

I truly believe that birth control should be paid more attention to. Because it leads to series of other issues in society that we want to avoid. Such as: “teen pregnancy, Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STDs), abortion, overpopulation, etc.” There are so many ways to prevent pregnancy, you can choose the one you feel is good. Some people support birth control and some don’t. But no one should ever tell you what to do because according to article 16: Marriage and Family says that every person has the right to choose whether they want a family or kids.


[1] “Sexually Transmitted Disease.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Sept. 2014. Web. 22 Sept. 2014. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexually_transmitted_disease>.

[2] “Birth Control Definition.” Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. www.merriam-webster.com%2Fdictionary%2Fbirth%2520control>.

[3] “A Brief History of Birth Control.” Time. Time Inc., 03 May 2010. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.

<http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0%2C9171%2C1983970%2C00.html>.

[4] “A Brief History of Birth Control.” Time. Time Inc., 03 May 2010. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.

<http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0%2C9171%2C1983970%2C00.html>.

[5] “A Brief History of Birth Control.” Time. Time Inc., 03 May 2010. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.

<http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0%2C9171%2C1983970%2C00.html>.

[6]“A Brief History of Birth Control.” Time. Time Inc., 03 May 2010. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.

<http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0%2C9171%2C1983970%2C00.html>.

[7] Collins. “Abstinence Facts.” Abstinence Facts. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/abstinence>.

[8] “Outercourse as Birth Control.” Outercourse as Birth Control. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/outercourse>.

[9] “Pull Out Method.” Pull Out Method – Withdrawal Method. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/withdrawal-pull-out-method>.

[10] “Birth Control Pills – Birth Control Pill – The Pill.” Birth Control Pills – Birth Control Pill – The Pill. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-pill>.

[11] “The Morning-After Pill – Emergency Contraception – Cost & Info.” The Morning-After Pill – Emergency Contraception – Cost & Info. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/morning-after-pill-emergency-contraception>.

[12] “Condoms – How to Put On a Condom Video.” Condoms – How to Put On a Condom Video. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/condom>.

[13] “Female Condoms – How to Use a Female Condom.” Female Condoms – How to Use a Female Condom. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/female-condom>.

[14]“Spermicide Effectiveness – Spermicides.” Spermicide Effectiveness – Spermicides. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 25 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/spermicide>.

[15] “Birth Control Sponge.” Birth Control Sponge. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 27 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-sponge-today-sponge>.

[16] “Birth Control Sponge.” Birth Control Sponge. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 27 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-sponge-today-sponge>.

[17] “Diaphragm :: Planned Parenthood.” Diaphragm :: Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 28 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/diaphragm>.

[18] “Diaphragm :: Planned Parenthood.” Diaphragm :: Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 28 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/diaphragm>.

[19] “Cervical Cap.” Cervical Cap. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2014. www.plannedparenthood.org%2Fhealth-info%2Fbirth-control%2Fcervical-cap%23>.

[20] “Cervical Cap.” Cervical Cap. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2014. www.plannedparenthood.org%2Fhealth-info%2Fbirth-control%2Fcervical-cap%23>.

[21] “Cervical Cap.” Cervical Cap. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2014. www.plannedparenthood.org%2Fhealth-info%2Fbirth-control%2Fcervical-cap%23>.

[22] “Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant.” Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-implant-implanon>.

[23] “Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant.” Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-implant-implanon>.

[24] “Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant.” Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-implant-implanon>.

[25] “Birth Control Patch.” Birth Control Patch. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-patch-ortho-evra>.

[26] “Birth Control Patch.” Birth Control Patch. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-patch-ortho-evra>.

[27] “Birth Control Shot.” Birth Control Shot. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 27

David

Birth Control

Introduction

How amazing would it be if we lived in a utopia where people can choose whether or not to get pregnant after unprotected sex and have no Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD). Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD) are diseases that has a high chance to be transmitted between humans by sexual intercourse, such as but not limited to: “vaginal intercourse, anal sex, oral sex, etc.”[1] Well unfortunately there is no utopia. But we have birth control methods that can prevent pregnancy and Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD). Birth control is the practice of preventing a woman from getting pregnant.[2] Birth control is an issue in society that needs more attention, simply because it leads to more problems such as: “teen pregnancy, abortion, overpopulation, STD, etc.”

History of Birth Control

Birth control was first used in the 1550 B.C by an Egyptian manuscript called the Ebers Papyrus. It gives women directions on how to mix dates, acacia and honey into a paste, spread it over the vagina and use it to prevent pregnancy. [3]

In the 1700s, the first condoms were being experimented. It ranged from sheep-bladder condoms to the use of half a lemon as a makeshift cervical cap. [4]

The first ever rubber condoms were invented in 1839 by Charles Goodyear. In 1873, United States of America is the only Western nation to criminalize contraception. During the 1800s a large cervical cap in developed.[5]

In 1954, John Rock conducted the first ever birth control pill and tested it on 50 women. In 1960 the FDA approved the use of birth control pills but little do they know that almost half a million U.S women are already using it.[6]

Now we have more advanced birth control methods. More and more people are using birth control to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

Methods of Birth Control

In the world today there are various ways to prevent pregnancy and a lot of them are very effective and safe. From sheep bladder condoms to super thin latex condoms. We see that as ass technology is improving, birth control methods are getting more and more advanced at the same time. There are birth control methods that are “natural” and do not involve any pills, condoms, and etc.

Abstinence is a natural birth control method, this is a method that doesn’t involve having sex with a partner. Couples may enjoy other types of sexual activities that do not lead to the female getting pregnant.[7] This method is 100% effective and safe because there is no interaction between a penis and a vagina. Similarly to abstinence outercourse is also a natural birth control method. Outercourse includes any kind of sexual activity that doesn’t involve vaginal intercourse and penetration.[8] It is also 100% effective and safe because it doesn’t involve any interaction between a penis and a vagina. The withdrawal (pull out) method in the other hand is a natural birth control method that involve sexual intercourse. A man will pull his penis out of the vagina before ejaculation. Ejaculation is when the semen spurts out of the penis.[9] This method can prevent pregnancy but has the risk to be diagnosed with Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD).

There are various birth control methods that involve the use of pills, substances, and objects. Birth control pills are well known throughout the world. There are many types of birth control pills, some are effective and some are not. A birth control pill prevents the egg from leaving the ovaries. It makes the cervical mucus thicker so the sperm is blocked and can’t make contact with the egg.[10] There is another kind of birth control pill but this one is for emergency use. It is called the morning after pill. After having unprotected sex, within this 5 days taking this emergency birth control pill will prevent pregnancy. It can take up to six days for the sperm and egg to meet after having sex so this pill can prevent pregnancy. This pill keeps the woman’s ovary from releasing egg for longer than usual.[11]

Condoms are made of thin latex or plastic that has been shaped like a penis. During sexual intercourse it is worn on the penis. Condoms can prevent pregnancy and lower the risk of getting Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STD). When a man ejaculates the condom collects the semen so it prevents the sperm entering the vagina.[12] There are also condoms for women. It works exactly the same as the condom worn by men, it collects the semen and prevents it entering the vagina. The female condom is inserted deep inside the vagina. The ring at the closed end holds the pouch in the vagina to block the semen entering the vagina. The ring at the open end stays outside the vaginal opening during intercourse where the man inserts his penis in.[13]

There are objects that is inserted into the women’s vagina to prevent pregnancy when no condom is used during sexual intercourse. They all have similarities in use. Some of them contain spermicide. Spermicide has chemicals that can stop a sperm from moving to prevent it from joining with the egg.[14] For example, the birth control sponge contains spermicide. It is soft, round, and two inch in diameter. It is made out of plastic foam.[15] Before sexaul intercourse, the birth control sponge is inserted deep inside the woman’s vagina. When the man ejaculates in the vagina, the sperm will be blocked by the birth control sponge.[16] And will be absorbed by the sponge. The diaphragm is a dome-shaped cup with a flexible rim.[17] It is made out of silicone and it is placed on the cervix to block the opening of the uterus.[18] The spermicide stops the sperm from moving so fertilization is not going to happen.

There are some that don’t have spermicide. For example, the cervical cap. The cervical cap is a silicone cup that has a shape of a sailor’s hat.[19] Woman inserts it into their vagina and over their cervix. [20]The cervical cap blocks the uterus from opening so the sperm is unable to fertilize the egg.[21]

There are birth control methods where hormones (Estrogen) are released into the body that prevents pregnancy. The birth control implant is a thin, flexible plastic implant about the size of a matchstick.[22] It is inserted under the skin of the upper arm. [23]It can prevent pregnancy for 3 three years. [24]Estrogen is released which prevents pregnancy. The birth control patch is similar to the birth control implant. It also releases estrogen into the body. But the birth control patch is a thin plastic patch that sticks to the skin like a bandage.[25] Once a week the patch has to be replaced by a new patch for three weeks then there will be a patch free week.[26] The birth control shot is an injection of hormones (Progestin) into the body to prevent pregnancy. Each shot prevents pregnancy for three months.[27]

We see that there are mostly birth control methods for females. Males only wear condoms to prevent pregnancy. So now people are starting to develop male birth controls. A new male birth control method is being developed. It is called Vasalgel; it is an injection not a pill. It blocks the tube where the sperm swim through from the testicle.[28] A man can have unprotected sex and won’t ejaculate. However, the injection has to be taken just above the testicles.[29] The Vasalgel is still in its early stages of development, it has only been tested on baboons and rabbits.[30] No human being has ever tried it yet. The price is not yet set, but the Foundation noted that Vasalgel is not more than $800. In other words, if you can afford an iPhone 6, you can definitely afford this new male birth control.[31]

Birth control comes with side effects too. Mainly the hormone-based birth control often comes with side effects that can range from little annoying to the point where you get fired up.[32] The birth control that involves inserting objects into a woman’s vagina has side effects such as vaginal infection.[33]

The birth control pill can cause headaches, dizziness, and breast tenderness. According to Hilda Hutcherson, MD, an ob-gyn professor at Columbia University.[34] These side effects will go away after taking the pill for a while.[35]

Nausea is mainly caused by the birth control patch.[36] According to Hilda Hutcherson, MD, an ob-gyn professor at Columbia University. Switching to oral birth control methods can help decrease nausea.[37]

Decreased sexual desire is caused by the birth control pill.[38] According to Hilda Hutcherson, MD, an ob-gyn professor at Columbia University. Switching to other types of birth control pills may help but if not change to other methods.[39]

Mood swings are caused by hormonal birth control methods.[40] Changing to nonhormal methods will help decrease mood swings.[41] All hormonal methods are likely to cause mood swings.[42]

Family Planning in Thailand

Since Thailand is a buddhist country birth control pills and condoms are the more preferable and acceptable methods.[43] Condoms are favourites among Thais. Because condoms don’t just prevent pregnancy but also prevents STDs.[44] According to Mechai Viravaidya, a politician in Thailand, “the Buddhist scriptures say that many births cause suffering, so Buddhism is not against birth control. And we even end up with monks sprinkling holy water on pills and condoms for the sanctity of the family before products went out into the villages.”[45] Mechai has been known as “Mr.Condom” in Thailand.[46] He brought awareness to condoms, birth control, and AIDS. Before he would giveaway condoms every valentines day.[47]From the time he began his campaign, the average number of children in Thai families has decreased from 7 to 1.5.[48] We can see that the number decreased dramatically. This is one of the reasons why Thailand is not overpopulated.

Birth Control in China

China has the most population in the world 1,366,990,000.[49] It takes up 19% of the world’s total population.[50] In the 1970s China’s population was growing tremendously. Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping established a policy called One Child policy in 1979 to limit China’s population growth.[51] This policy limits couples to one child.

It is well known that those who violate the policy have sometimes been subjected to abortions.[52] If they already gave birth, they are forced to pay fines and have been sterilized.[53] Which means they are unable to give birth for the rest of their lives.

A lot of people have been questioning whether or not this policy can reduce the growth of China’s population. A study taken by the University of California in April 2007, found that the policy is very effective and reduces the fertility rate in China. After the announcement of the one-child policy, the fertility rate in China dropped from 2.63 births per woman in 1980 (already a sharp reduction from more than five births per woman in the early 1970s) to 1.61 in 2009.

The Chinese government didn’t directly inform people to use birth control. By having the one-child policy, the Chinese people are very well aware that they must use birth control to prevent breaking the law.

Different Views on Birth Control

Different religions have different views on birth control. Some are against it and some support it. Even some religion changed their view on birth control over time. Until the 20th century birth control was not approved by Christianity. It was seen as a barrier to God’s procreative purpose of marriage.[54] In Judaism, Orthodox rabbis believe that making babies is a male duty. But many rabbis allow birth control cases because pregnancy can seriously harm the woman.[55] Conservative and Reform Jews however feel that birth control have benefits, such as family stability, disease prevention, and less stress, etc.[56] Hinduism encourages reproduction within marriage, but there is appeal against birth control.[57] Most Hindus accept that there is a duty to have a family during a person’s lifetime. So they are unlikely to use birth control to prevent having children.[58] In Hinduism people are encouraged to make more babies. In Islam, birth control is encouraged to youngsters and married couples. Birth control is supported because of economic reasons and the health of the woman. Also it will make the marriage more fun.[59]

UDHR

Birth control is related to article 16: Marriage and Family in the United Declaration of Human Rights. Every adult has the right to marry and have kids if they want to[60]. Every single person has the right to use birth control or not. It’s their own decision whether or not to want to have a baby and how many babies they want. Nothing can stop you from preventing pregnancy or getting pregnant.

Conclusion

Birth control is an issue that hasn’t really been recognized by the society. Birth control is a very serious issue since it can lead to more problems such as: “teen pregnancy, abortion, overpopulation, STD, etc.” As we can see India’s population is growing tremendously quick. By 2030, India will surpass China and be the world’s most populated country.[61] India does not have the One-Child policy and poor people do not have access to birth control pills or other kind of methods.

I think that right now there are too less male birth control methods. Vasalgel is being developed but seeing that it is an injection right above the testicals scares a lot of men. Also it hasn’t been tested on a human yet. In my opinion researchers should develop some type of pill that can stop the tube that the sperm swims through from the testicle. More people will buy it because it is safer than an injection.

I think condoms are the safest and most effective method. It can definitely prevent pregnancy and also prevent STDs. No direct contact is being made between the penis and vagina so no STDs can be transferred. People complain that it doesn’t feel as good as unprotected sex. But unprotected sex can kill you, on the other hand condom is there to prevent you from dying.

The One-Child policy helped China stabilize their population growth. I believe India should have this policy too because the population of India is increasing dramatically. If it is not stopped it can affect India’s economy and their will be a high demand of goods and not enough supply. By limiting one child per family the population growth will slow down a lot and the country can improve different things.

I truly believe that birth control should be paid more attention to. Because it leads to series of other issues in society that we want to avoid. Such as: “teen pregnancy, Sexual Transmitted Diseases(STDs), abortion, overpopulation, etc.” There are so many ways to prevent pregnancy, you can choose the one you feel is good. Some people support birth control and some don’t. But no one should ever tell you what to do because according to article 16: Marriage and Family says that every person has the right to choose whether they want a family or kids.


[1] “Sexually Transmitted Disease.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Sept. 2014. Web. 22 Sept. 2014. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexually_transmitted_disease>.

[2] “Birth Control Definition.” Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. www.merriam-webster.com%2Fdictionary%2Fbirth%2520control>.

[3] “A Brief History of Birth Control.” Time. Time Inc., 03 May 2010. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.

<http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0%2C9171%2C1983970%2C00.html>.

[4] “A Brief History of Birth Control.” Time. Time Inc., 03 May 2010. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.

<http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0%2C9171%2C1983970%2C00.html>.

[5] “A Brief History of Birth Control.” Time. Time Inc., 03 May 2010. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.

<http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0%2C9171%2C1983970%2C00.html>.

[6]“A Brief History of Birth Control.” Time. Time Inc., 03 May 2010. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.

<http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0%2C9171%2C1983970%2C00.html>.

[7] Collins. “Abstinence Facts.” Abstinence Facts. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/abstinence>.

[8] “Outercourse as Birth Control.” Outercourse as Birth Control. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/outercourse>.

[9] “Pull Out Method.” Pull Out Method – Withdrawal Method. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/withdrawal-pull-out-method>.

[10] “Birth Control Pills – Birth Control Pill – The Pill.” Birth Control Pills – Birth Control Pill – The Pill. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-pill>.

[11] “The Morning-After Pill – Emergency Contraception – Cost & Info.” The Morning-After Pill – Emergency Contraception – Cost & Info. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/morning-after-pill-emergency-contraception>.

[12] “Condoms – How to Put On a Condom Video.” Condoms – How to Put On a Condom Video. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/condom>.

[13] “Female Condoms – How to Use a Female Condom.” Female Condoms – How to Use a Female Condom. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/female-condom>.

[14]“Spermicide Effectiveness – Spermicides.” Spermicide Effectiveness – Spermicides. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 25 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/spermicide>.

[15] “Birth Control Sponge.” Birth Control Sponge. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 27 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-sponge-today-sponge>.

[16] “Birth Control Sponge.” Birth Control Sponge. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 27 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-sponge-today-sponge>.

[17] “Diaphragm :: Planned Parenthood.” Diaphragm :: Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 28 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/diaphragm>.

[18] “Diaphragm :: Planned Parenthood.” Diaphragm :: Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 28 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/diaphragm>.

[19] “Cervical Cap.” Cervical Cap. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2014. www.plannedparenthood.org%2Fhealth-info%2Fbirth-control%2Fcervical-cap%23>.

[20] “Cervical Cap.” Cervical Cap. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2014. www.plannedparenthood.org%2Fhealth-info%2Fbirth-control%2Fcervical-cap%23>.

[21] “Cervical Cap.” Cervical Cap. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2014. www.plannedparenthood.org%2Fhealth-info%2Fbirth-control%2Fcervical-cap%23>.

[22] “Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant.” Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-implant-implanon>.

[23] “Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant.” Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-implant-implanon>.

[24] “Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant.” Implanon Side Effects – Birth Control Implant. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-implant-implanon>.

[25] “Birth Control Patch.” Birth Control Patch. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-patch-ortho-evra>.

[26] “Birth Control Patch.” Birth Control Patch. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2014. <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-info/birth-control/birth-control-patch-ortho-evra>.

[27] “Birth Control Shot.” Birth Control Shot. Planned Parenthood, n.d. Web. 27

Cite This Work

To export a reference to this article please select a referencing stye below:

Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.

Related Services

View all

DMCA / Removal Request

If you are the original writer of this essay and no longer wish to have your work published on the UKDiss.com website then please: