The exchanging And Substituting Foods English Language Essay

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You've heard it before. It's important to start the day right and eat breakfast. So try to allow time for breakfast before you rush off to work. If need be do some preliminary preparation the night before such as setting up your coffee maker, deciding on and measuring the amount of cereal you will be eating, etc. Many busy people prepare breakfast at home and bring it to work in a plastic container. Do what you need to do - but don't skip breakfast!

In the 7-Day Jump Start Diet, you may substitute wholesome whole-grain cereal for any specified cereal. For example, if you're not crazy about having Shredded Wheat for breakfast on Day 6, substitute Wheat Chex or Cheerios, etc. And if you don't like the fried egg called for on Day 5, have a hard-boiled egg or make a scrambled egg instead. Maybe the cantaloupe called for in the meal plan is not in season. No problem. Just replace the cantaloupe with a half cup of orange juice. For a more complete list of food substitutions and exchanges see the text and table on pages 14 and 15.

7-Day Diet Lunch Guidelines

On most days of the 7-Day Jump Start Diet for Women, lunch will call for either soup or a sandwich..

Feel free to substitute a soup you favor in place of those indicated - provided the basic type of soup and calorie counts are similar to those specified in the 7-Day Jump Start Diet for Women. For example, Day 1 calls for a cup of Lentil Soup (140 Calories), but if you prefer, you may substitute a cup of Navy Bean Soup - which is in the same food group as lentil soup and contains approximately the same calorie count.

Warm Weather Substitutions: On warm and especially very hot days, you may want to substitute a sandwich, a tuna or salmon salad for the soup of the day.

7-Day Diet Dinner Guidelines

On the 7-Day Jump Start Diet for Women, one of the dinner mainstays is a "Tossed Green Salad." Prepare your "Tossed Green Salad" in a bowl with a volume of at least 16 ounces, or 2 cups. First add about 1 cup of either green leaf lettuce, Romaine lettuce or a mesclun mix. Then add, as desired, half cup of green veggies such as broccoli, celery, cucumber, peppers, spinach, or watercress. This vegetable combination will, on average, total about 35 Calories. You will be eating a "Tossed Green Salad" just about every day at dinnertime. Remember that variety is the key to a nutritious diet. So be sure to vary the ingredients of the salad.

Top your "Tossed Green Salad" with 2 tablespoons of any light salad dressing available at your local supermarket that contains no more than 50 Calories for 2 tablespoons. Some of my favorite light salad dressings are:

Ken's Steakhouse Fat Free Raspberry Pecan (50 Calories for 2 Tbsp) Kraft Light Done Right House Italian (40 Calories for 2 Tbsp)

Newman's Own Lighten Up! Balsamic Vinaigrette (45 Calories for 2 Tbsp) Wishbone Just 2 Good Honey Dijon (50 Calories for 2 Tbsp)

Your "Tossed Green Salad" with salad dressing will cost you roughly 70 Calories but will be packed with lots of health-giving vitamins, minerals and fiber.

Snack Guidelines

On some of the menus in the 7-Day Jump Start Diet for Women feature a morning snack, an afternoon snack and an evening snack. The main snacks are:

Yogurt: I recommend Dannon Light at 90 Calories per container (at this writing). Select any flavor. There are other brands you may prefer but whatever you buy be certain you eat no more than 90 Calories worth of yogurt for your snack.

Fresh Fruit in season: Choose an apple, pear, peach, plum, watermelon (1 cup), etc. You will be eating fruit every day. So vary the fruit that you select to get good array of micronutrients.

Handful of Unsalted Mixed Nuts: Nuts and seeds are loaded with protein and fiber. This eBook uses a "handful" as a convenient descriptor rather than something like "16 almonds = 100 Calories," but be aware that although nuts are a healthy food, nuts are also a high-calorie food. Buy mixed nuts to get a range of micronutrients. And please no salt.

Skinny Cow Ice Cream Sandwich: This is a relatively low-calorie, low fat, yummy dairy-sweet snack.

Kashi TLC Chewy Granola Bar: A sweet treat packed with whole grains, nuts and seeds. The bar comes in four flavors - with each containing about 140 Calories.

Orville Redenbacher's Smart Pop Popcorn Mini Bag: Popcorn is a tasty, nutritious high-fiber, filling snack. For a busy adult you can't beat Orville Redenbacher's Smart Pop Popcorn Mini Bag which you can just nuke and eat.

But for the best popcorn we suggest you purchase a hot-air popper which uses popping corn, a type of corn that bursts from the kernel and puffs up when heated. (A popular brand is Orville Redenbacher's Original Gourmet Popping Corn.) A hot-air popper will make a large batch of popcorn in a few minutes. For a snack, eat only 5 or 6 cups of the popcorn and store the remainder for another day. At this writing, you can buy a hot-air popper for approximately $22.00.

About Bread

First understand that bread, more specifically whole-grain breads, are good sources of complex carbohydrates and dietary fiber, as well as several B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and folate), vitamin E, and minerals (iron, magnesium and selenium).

In recent years, however, sliced bread loaves have gotten larger, as have the bread slices inside these loaves. Just a few years ago the standard slice of bread contained about 70 Calories - now most are 100 plus Calories.

The 7-Day Jump Start Diet requires whole-grain bread at 70 Calories per slice. Quite a few bakers sell thin sliced or "light" sliced bread. The difficult part is finding a whole grain thin sliced or "light" bread (with about 70 Calories per slice). Whatever the brand, make sure the first word in the Ingredients list is "whole." "Pepperidge Farm Small Slice 100% Whole Wheat" is a good choice. It's whole grain, has 70 Calories per slice and it tastes good too.

Exchanging & Substituting Foods

If there is a food listed in the 7-Day Jump Start Diet that you don't like, or perhaps that you forgot to pick up while shopping, you probably can exchange or substitute another food in its place - a technique used by dieticians. Exchanging a food listed in a diet for another food with approximately equal caloric value and nutritional content is the foundation of a successful long-term diet. Substitution possibilities are almost endless but have to be done carefully.

The easiest substitutions are those within the same food group, such as exchanging one vegetable variety for another, or a glass of milk for a cup of yogurt. More sophisticated exchanges cross food groups, for instance replacing 3½ ounces of turkey with a tablespoon of peanut butter spread on a piece of whole wheat bread. Both foods are complete protein and both contain about 175 Calories.

Refer to the calorie table in Appendix A (at the end of this eBook). With some understanding and experience, you can use this table to help you substitute foods called for in the 7-Day Jump Start Diet with equal calorie foods from the same food group.

7-Day Food Item

Substitution

Artichoke salad (Day 4 recipe)

Any green veggie for artichokes

Asparagus, green beans, etc

Any other green veggie

Brown rice

Medium potato

Cantaloupe (½)

Orange juice (½ cup)

Cereal

Exchange any cereal with any other whole-grain cereal

Chicken Sausage

Chicken or turkey franks

Chocolate (Day 6)

2 small sugar cookies or 4 graham cracker squares

Cod (Day 6 recipe)

Any other white fish

Cottage cheese (1 cup)

Two 8 oz glasses skim milk (probably impractical)

Eggs

Egg Beaters Egg Substitute

Fresh fruit in season

¾ cup canned fruit (no sugar added)

Frozen entrée (Day 5)

Frozen entrée with same calorie count

Grapefruit (½)

Orange (medium)

Handful of mixed nuts

Orville Redenbacher's Smart Pop Popcorn Mini Bag

Pancakes (Day 3 recipe)

Kashi Go Lean Waffles

Pasta (Day 7 recipe)

Bottled Marinara tomato sauce

Peanut butter

Almond butter

Popcorn

Handful of mixed nuts

Pork chop

Poultry or fish (5 oz)

Raisin bread

Plain whole-grain bread

Salmon (Day 1 recipe)

Tuna

Soup

Any soup with same calorie count

Tossed green salad

Unlimited steamed greens (spinach, broccoli, etc)

Turkey

Chicken (white meat)

Veggie burger (Day 2 recipe)

Gardenburger

Whole-grain bread

Vary bread type (whole wheat, rye, etc)

Wine (4 oz)

Grapes (1 cup)

Yogurt

6 oz skim milk

Food Substitution Chart

Breakfast: You may substitute any cereal for any other wholesome cereal. For example, if you're not crazy about having Shredded Wheat for breakfast on Day 6, substitute Wheat Chex or Cheerios, etc. If you don't like the soft-boiled egg called for on Day 2, make yourself a scrambled egg instead. And if Cantaloupe is on the menu but is not in season, replace the cantaloupe with a half cup of orange juice.

Snacks: Again, where yogurt is specified you may substitute an 8-ounce glass of skim milk, but to maintain a nutritionally balanced diet keep this snack a dairy selection. Similarly, when fruit is on the agenda, you may select another type of fruit but do not stray from the fruit group. Nuts and popcorn can be interchanged at will. (Incidentally, you should buy a hot-air popper. They make great popcorn - which is high in fiber and makes a tasty and nutritious snack.)

7-Day Diet Facts

As mentioned previously, there are, in fact, two diet plans in this eBook: 900 Calorie Diet (starting on page 23) and a 1,200 Calorie Diet (starting on page 31). Both diets have a detailed meal plan for each of the 7 days. An overview of the meal pattern for the 900 and 1,200 Calorie Diets is shown on page 21. In addition, there is also a "Recipe of the Day" and "Diet Tip of the Day" (starting on page 38).

The 1,200 Calorie diet adheres to the United States Department of Agriculture recommendation that suggest a balanced diet should have approximately 50 percent of its calories from carbs, about 20 percent from protein sources and 30 percent or less from fat. (Note, the 7-Day Jump Start Diet may not be appropriate for individuals with illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, food allergies, etc. Again, please see your physician before starting any diet.)

900-Calorie Diet: Because of the very low calorie level, this diet does not provide all the nutrients and micro nutrients you need for good health. But over the short term this should not be a problem for healthy adults. Also note that on 900 Calories per day you will undoubtedly feel hungry at times.

1,200-Calorie Diet: Due to the relatively low calorie level, you will just barely get all the nutrients and micro nutrients you need - and you also might occasionally feel hungry.

Important Notes Applicable to 7-Day Diets

If desired, skim milk and a sugar substitute may be added to coffee or tea.

Fried eggs, scrambled eggs, or an omelet should be cooked in a pan coated with a non-stick cooking spray.

On bread, corn on the cob, baked potatoes, if desired, you may use a zero-calorie butter substitute spray.

Cereals should be whole grain and preferably unsweetened. At the top of the list are Old-fashioned Oat Meal, Wheatena and Shredded Wheat. Among other reasonably healthy choices are Cheerios, Wheat Chex, Wheaties, some Kashi cereals and Farina.

Bread may be either plain or toasted whole grain, such as whole wheat, whole rye or pumpernickel. If desired, bread may be sprayed with a zero-calorie butter substitute.

Use only lean cuts of meat trimmed of all visible fat. Poultry should be limited to chicken or turkey breasts (white meat only and skinless).

When canned tuna or salmon is specified, use only fish packed in water.

An unlimited amount of green salad may be eaten, but the salad dressing should be as specified. (Incidentally, in the meal plans Evoo means extra virgin olive oil.)

Use freely as desired: clear unsweetened coffee, clear unsweetened tea, water, seltzer water and any diet soda.

Use freely as desired: clear soups without fat, bouillon, and seasonings such as mustard, cinnamon, dill, herbs, red and black pepper, curry, vinegar, lemon juice and sections, and dill and sour pickles.

Any specified snack may be moved to any other part of the day, and/or combined with breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Keeping It Off

Within five years, more than 90 percent of all dieters regain every pound they have lost. Why? In most cases it's because after losing weight most people eventually revert to their pre-diet eating and exercising habits, and this inevitably leads to their regaining the weight they lost- and often more. The fact is the less you weigh, the less you need to eat to sustain your lower weight.

A study, published in a 2005 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, that followed 4,000 people for three decades suggests that in the long term, 90 percent of men and 70 percent of women will become overweight. Interestingly, half of the men and women in the study, who had made it well into adulthood without a weight problem, ultimately also became overweight and a third actually became obese. The point being that you can never become complacent. You must continually watch your weight because we are all at risk of becoming overweight.

As mentioned previously, the key to long-term weight control success is knowledge and understanding, combined of course with desire and self-discipline.

7-Day Step-Up Maintenance Plan

This is a method used by some successful maintainers. After you lose weight at a known calorie level, you step up to the next higher calorie level to try to determine your weight maintenance calorie level.

For example, Rose Griffin a 5' 4", relatively inactive 48-year old went from 145 to 133 pounds on a 1,200 Calorie per day plan. (She used my 30-Day Quick Diet for Women published by NoPaperPress.) She then stepped up to the 1,500 Calorie per day plan and after 14 days discovered she was still losing weight, albeit at a much slower rate. But she didn't want to lose more weight, so she stepped up to the 1,800 Calorie per day plan where her weight did not change. She had found her approximate weight maintenance calorie level (1,800 Calories), i.e., the number of calories she could eat without gaining or losing weight.

How to Use This eBook

First, depending on your size, your age and how active you are, refer to page 7 and choose the diet calorie level that's right for you, either 900 or 1,200 Calories per day.

900-Calorie Meal Plan starts on page 23. (See page 19 for the applicable Food Shopping List.)

1,200-Calorie Meal Plan starts on page 31. (See page 20 for the applicable Food Shopping List.)

Next, study the meal plan for the calorie level you have selected and then scan the appropriate Food Shopping List. Finally, using the food shopping list prepare a list of the foods you don't have on hand - that you will need to buy.

Food Shopping List (900-Calorie Diet)

Orange juice (1 pint)

Orange (1)

Cantaloupe (1)

Banana (1)

Fresh fruit in season (apple, peach, plum, etc) (5)

Fresh or frozen blueberries (1 package)

Wheaties (1 serving)

Wheat Chex (1 serving)

Cheerios (1 serving)

Shredded Wheat (1 serving)

Eggs (2)

Pancake syrup (lite)

Coffee & tea

Skim milk (1 pint)

Yogurt (6 oz nonfat, any flavor) (1)

Whole grain bread (7 slices)

Hot dog bun (1)

Hamburger bun (1)

Tomatoes (2)

Summer Squash

Zucchini

Green beans

Asparagus (7 spears)

Lentil Soup

Split Pea Soup

Tomato Bouillon

Beef Bouillon

Turkey (sliced white meat) (1 oz)

Ham (sliced & lean) (2 oz)

Swiss Cheese (low-fat) (2 oz)

Cottage cheese (1 cup low fat)

Tuna (solid white albacore packed in water) (3 oz can)

Salmon (4 to 5 oz fillet)

Cod (4 to 5 oz fillet)

Veal chop (4 oz, lean)

Chicken sausage (2 links about 2½ oz per link)

Lean Cuisine Thai-Style Chicken (Café ClassicsTM)

Whole wheat Pasta (½ lb serves 4 people)

Salad ingredients (See page 13 for recommended salad dressings)

Note: For additional food items see Day 1 through Day 7 Recipes

Food Shopping List (1,200-Calorie Diet)

Orange juice (1 quart)

Orange (1)

Cantaloupe (1)

Banana (1)

Fresh fruit in season (apple, peach, plum, etc) (8) Fresh or frozen blueberries (1 package)

Wheaties (2 servings)

Cheerios (1 serving)

Shredded Wheat (1 serving)

Eggs (2)

Pancake syrup (lite)

Coffee and or Tea

Skim milk (1 quart)

Yogurt (6 oz nonfat, any flavor) (3)

Whole grain bread (7 slices)

Hot dog bun (1)

Hamburger bun (1)

Tomatoes (2), Summer Squash, Zucchini, Peas Green beans, Asparagus (7 spears), Beets (3 small) Brown Rice

Lentil Soup

Split Pea Soup Tomato Bouillon Beef Bouillon

Turkey (sliced white meat) (1 oz)

Ham (sliced & lean) (2 oz)

Swiss Cheese (low-fat) (2 oz)

Cottage cheese (1 cup low fat)

Tuna (solid white albacore packed in water) (3 oz can)

Salmon (4 to 5 oz fillet)

Cod (4 to 5 oz fillet)

Veal chop (4 oz, lean)

Chicken sausage (2 links about 2½ oz per link)

Lean Cuisine Thai-Style Chicken (Café ClassicsTM)

Whole wheat Pasta (½ lb serves 4 people)

Salad ingredients (See page 13 for recommended salad dressings)

Popcorn (see pages 13 &14), Unsalted Nuts (3 handfuls), Dark Chocolate (1 oz)

Note: For additional food items see Day 1 through Day 7 Recipes.

Overview of Meal Plans

Overview of Meal Plans

Day

Breakfast

Morning

Snack

Lunch

Afternoon

Snack

Dinner

Evening

Snack

900 Calorie Meal Plan

1

Wheaties

None

Soup & Sand

None

Fish

None

2

SB Egg

None

Tuna Salad

None

Veggie Burger

None

3

Pancakes

None

Sandwich

None

Meat

None

4

Cheerios

None

Cottage Cheese

None

Chicken

None

5

Wheaties

None

Sandwich

None

Frozen Meal

None

6

Scr Egg

None

Soup

None

Fish

None

7

Shr Wheat

None

Hot dog

None

Pasta

None

1,200 Calorie Meal Plan

1

Wheaties

None

Soup & Sand

None

Fish

Popcorn

2

SB Egg

None

Tuna Salad

Yogurt

Veggie Burger

None

3

Pancakes

None

Sandwich

None

Meat

None

4

Cheerios

Fruit

Cottage Cheese

Nuts

Chicken

None

5

Scr Egg

Yogurt

Soup

None

Frozen Meal

Cookies

6

Wheaties

Yogurt

Sandwich

Fruit

Fish

Chocolate

7

Shr Wheat

None

Hot dog

Yogurt

Pasta

None

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