Sunshine Standards And Learning Outcomes English Language Essay

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Ask the students, what does "beginning" mean?  What does it mean if something is in the "middle"?  What is a word that means the same as "end"?  Why is it important for the events in a story to be in a certain order? Ask the students to recite the days of the week with you, possibly pointing to the names on the calendar as you go.  Which days are at the beginning of the week?  (Sunday, Monday) Which days are in the middle?  (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday)  Which days are at the end of the week? (Friday, Saturday).  Note:  Some students may want to consider Sunday at the end of the week as part of the weekend, so discuss that possibility if needed, because the story considers Sunday the beginning of the week.)

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Sunshine Standards and Learning Outcomes:

LA.K.1.7.3 The student will retell the main idea or essential message, identifying supporting details (e.g., who, what, when, where, why, how), and arranging events in sequence.

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LA.K.2.1.2 The student will retell the main events (e.g., beginning, middle, end) of a story, and describe characters and setting.

LA.K.2.1.5 The student will participate in a group response to various literary selections (e.g., nursery rhymes, fairy tales, picture books), identifying the character(s), setting, and sequence of events and connecting text to self (personal connection).

LA.K.3.1.2 The student will pre-write by drawing a picture about ideas from stories read aloud or generated through class discussion.

Materials Needed:

The Very Hungry Caterpillar, by Eric Carle

Tri-fold paper or black line graphic organizer for each student

Crayons

Topic Outline with Teacher Activities and Questioning:

Learning Styles:

The following activities will most benefit visual, auditory, and tactile learners:

The student learns visually from seeing the pages of the book.

The student learns audibly by hearing the teacher read the book.

The student learns tactilely by making the graphic organizer, drawing pictures and acting out parts of a song, pledge, a ball game - like throwing, catching, batting, etc.

For Culturally and Linguistically diverse students make sure to:

Enunciate words without raising your voice when reading the story.

Try to support your words with visuals and gestures.

Point directly to objects in the book, dramatize concepts, and display pictures when appropriate.

Write clearly and legibly in print when making the graphic organizer.

Tell students they will learn about the beginning, middle, and end of a story.  Have a quick-paced discussion about the beginning, middle, and end of other common things, such as the school day, how a caterpillar becomes a butterfly, sounds in words, such as /c/ /a/ /t/, a baseball game, a familiar song, etc.  Discuss how there may be more than one event that can be classified as the beginning, middle, or end, and how some endings are really the beginning of a new process. You might also talk about how certain words and phrases in a story give clues about whether it is at the beginning, middle, or end. 

Explain to students that they will be discussing what happens at the beginning, middle, and end of the story you are going to read to them.   At the end of the lesson, you will ask them to tell what happens at the beginning middle and the end of the story so that you will know whether they have learned what you want to teach them.

Introduce the book The Very Hungry Caterpillar, by Eric Carle by asking students to consider the title.  Ask, "What do you think a very hungry caterpillar eats?" and allow students an opportunity to share their ideas. 

Begin reading the book to the class.  As you read, pause to identify the parts of the text.  For instance, before reading the first page say, "Let's see what happens at the beginning of the book."  When you reach the part where the caterpillar begins to eat, you might say, "Here comes the middle of the story."  Finally, as the caterpillar builds his cocoon you might wonder aloud, "I think this is the ending of the book." 

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After you have read the book, draw a three-column chart on the board or chart paper, with the column labels, "Beginning,"  "Middle", and "End".  Since you are modeling this for students, think aloud while you say something such as,

"What happened at the beginning of The Very Hungry Caterpillar?  Well, in the beginning, there was an egg.  The caterpillar was born in the beginning of the story.  At the beginning of the story it was Sunday."

Record these ideas in the "Beginning" column of your chart.

There was an egg.

The caterpillar was born.

It was Sunday.

Guided Practice: Complete the next part of the chart with students, asking the question, "What happened in the middle of the story?  What happened at the end of the story?"  If a student offers an idea that fits better in another section of the chart, you might reply with a comment such as, "Oh, I remember that part, too.  I think it would be great to add that to the "end" section of our chart."  By the end of the discussion, your chart should include some of the following ideas:

Beginning:       The Caterpillar was born and was hungry.

Middle:            Each day the caterpillar ate a little more than the day before.

End:                The caterpillar changed into a butterfly.

Trifold a regular size paper for each  Kindergarten student, pass them out, and have students follow along with you as you model writing letter "B" for beginning in the first section, "M" for middle in the middle section and "E" for end for the last section, leaving room to draw in each section.

(Optional:  A blackline graphic organizer already labeled Beginning, Middle, End could be used instead.)

Independent Practice: Have students identify events in the beginning, middle, and end of the story, drawing a picture for each section on their paper.  Encourage them to sound out words to spell them in order to label their drawings or write a sentence about it.

Additional guided practice: for review of beginning, middle, and end of common things, groups of students could be encouraged to take turns acting out some things, such as throwing, catching, batting, etc. for the ballgame or pledge, song, calendar, story, etc.

Evaluation:

Teacher will check each student's tri-fold page drawings to make sure the pictures correctly reflect the beginning, middle, and end of the story.  It is best to look at the drawings individually with the child for any clarification if needed, which also allows for each child to have self-assessment as he/she thinks about what has been learned and verbalizes it to the teacher or in a pair/share.

Another way to assess understanding of the sequence of a story is to choose a different, familiar book and ask students to identify the beginning, middle, and end of that story, pausing after each element. This could be done in partners, with the teacher circulating and checking for understanding.  

Student Participation-Guided practice:

Complete the next part of the chart with students, asking the question, "What happened in the middle of the story?  What happened at the end of the story?"  If a student offers an idea that fits better in another section of the chart, you might reply with a comment such as, "Oh, I remember that part, too. I think it would be great to add that to the "end" section of our chart." By the end of the discussion, your chart should include some of the following ideas:

Beginning:       The Caterpillar was born and was hungry.

Middle:            Each day the caterpillar ate a little more than the day before.

End:                The caterpillar changed into a butterfly.

Trifold a regular size paper for each  Kindergarten student, pass them out, and have students follow along with you as you model writing letter "B" for beginning in the first section, "M" for middle in the middle section and "E" for end for the last section, leaving room to draw in each section.

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(Optional:  A blackline graphic organizer already labeled Beginning, Middle, End could be used instead.)

For review of beginning, middle, and end of common things, groups of students could be encouraged to take turns acting out some things, such as throwing, catching, batting, etc. for the ballgame or pledge, song, calendar, story, etc.

Student Participation-Independent practice:

Have students identify events in the beginning, middle, and end of the story, drawing a picture for each section on their paper.  Encourage them to sound out words to spell them in order to label their drawings or write a sentence about it.

Accommodations for Special Needs Students:

The graphic organizer can be written on the board in Spanish (or any language needed) side by side with the English answers.

Closure:

Remind the students that when we tell a story it is important to talk about the events in the correct order, so the story makes sense.  Ask the children to take their page home and share The Very Hungry Caterpillar story with a parent, using their paper to help them remember to tell it in order. What are the parts of the story we practiced today?  (Repeat with them; beginning, middle and end.)