Obey The Ten Minutes Rule English Language Essay

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Steve Jobs was an American entrepreneur. He is best known as the co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Apple Inc. Through Apple, he was widely recognized as a charismatic pioneer of the personal computer revolution and for his influential career in the computer and consumer electronics fields. Jobs also co-founded and served as chief executive of Pixar Animation Studios; he became a member of the board of directors of The Walt Disney Company in 2006, when Disney acquired Pixar.

In the late 1970s, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak engineered one of the first commercially successful lines of personal computers, the Apple II series. Jobs was among the first to see the commercial potential of Xerox PARC's mouse-driven graphical user interface, which led to the creation of the Apple Lisa and, one year later, the Macintosh. By introducing the LaserWriter he enabled a revolution called desktop publishing.

Jobs Presentations mainly consists of three major topics which really enhances his presentaions and made them world class. They are following points:

Create a Story

Deliver the Experience

Refine and Rehearse.

These points are further explained in very brief manner that how they helps in making the presentations extraordinary.

Create a Story

Creating the story, the plot, is the first step to selling your ideas with power, persuasion, and charisma. Succeeding at this step separates mediocre communicators from extraordinary ones. Most people fail to think through their story. Effective communicators plan effectively, develop compelling messages and headlines, make it easy for their listeners to follow the narrative, and introduce a common enemy to build the drama.

This includes lot of further illustrating points which we must consider.

Plan in Analog

Steve Jobs has built a reputation in the digital world of bits and bytes, but he creates stories in the very old world tradition of pen and paper. His presentations are theatrical events intended to generate maximum publicity, buzz, and awe. They contain all of the elements of great plays or movies: conflict, resolution, villains, and heroes. And, in line with all great movie directors, Jobs storyboards the plot before picking up a "camera" (i.e., opening the presentation software). It's marketing theatre unlike any other. Jobs is closely involved in every detail of a presentation: writing descriptive taglines, creating slides, practicing demos, and making sure the lighting is just right. Jobs take nothing for granted. He does what most top presentation designers recommend: he starts on paper. "There's just something about paper and pen and sketching out rough ideas in the 'analog world' in the early stages that seems to lead to more clarity and better,

more creative results. Think about what happens when you open PowerPoint. A blank format

slide appears that contains space for words-a title and subtitle. This presents a problem. There are very few words in a Steve Jobs presentation. Now think about the first thing you see in the drop-down menu under Format: Bullets & Numbering. This leads to the second problem. There are no bullet points in a Steve Jobs presentation. The software itself forces you to create a template that represents the exact opposite of what you need to speak like Steve! In fact, as you will learn in later scenes, texts and bullets are the least effective way to deliver information intended to be recalled and acted upon. Save your bullet points for grocery lists. Visually engaging presentations will inspire your audience. And yes, they require a bit of work, especially in the planning phase. As a communications coach, I work with CEOs and other top executives on their media, presentation, and public speaking skills.

Answer the One Question That Matters Most.

During the planning phase of your presentation, always remember that it's not about you. It's about them. The listeners in your audience are asking themselves one question-"Why should I care?" Answering that one question right out of the gate will grab people's attention and keep them engaged. Answer the one question in all of your marketing materials:

website, presentation slides, and press releases. The people who should know better-public relations professionals-are often the worst violators of this rule. The majority of press

releases are usually self-indulgent, buzzword-filled wastes of time. Few members of the press even read press releases, because the documents fail to answer the one question that

matters most to a reporter-Why should my readers care? As a journalist, I've seen thousands of press releases and rarely, if ever, covered a story based on one. Most other journalists would concur.

Create Headlines

Create headlines that are specific, are memorable, and, best of all, can fit in a Twitter post. Twitter is a fast-growing social networking site that could best be described as your life between e-mail and blogs. Millions of users "tweet" about the daily happenings in their lives and can choose to follow the happenings of others. Twitter is changing the nature of business communication in a fundamental way-it forces people to write concisely. The maximum post-or tweet-is 140 characters. Characters include letters, spaces, and punctuation.

Draw a Road Map

. It is well established that we can hold only small amounts

of information in short-term, or "active," memory. Comedians know that three is funnier than two. Writers know that three is more dramatic than four. Jobs draws a verbal road map for his audience, a preview of coming attractions. Typically these road maps are outlined in

groups of three-a presentation might be broken into "three acts," a product description into "three features," a demo into "three parts." Jobs's love of threes can be traced back at least

as early as the original Macintosh introduction on January 24, 1984. Appearing at the Flint Center, in Cupertino, California, Jobs told the audience, "There have only been two milestone

Products in our industry: the Apple II in 1977 and the IBM PC in 1981. Today we are introducing the third industry milestone product, the Macintosh. And it has turned out insanely great!"2 Verbal guideposts serve as road maps, helping your listeners

Follow the story. When coaching clients to appear in the media, I always instruct them to create an easy-to-follow story by clearly outlining three or, at the most, four main points before filling in the details. When this technique is followed, reporters will

often take extensive notes. If the spokesperson misses a point, reporters will ask, "Didn't you say you had three points? I heard only two." A verbal road map of three things will help your listeners keep their place.

Introduce the Antagonist

In every classic story, the hero fights the villain. The same storytelling outline applies to world-class presentations. Steve Jobs establishes the foundation of a persuasive story

by introducing his audience to an antagonist, an enemy, a problem in need of a solution. In 1984, the enemy was "Big Blue."Apple is behind one of the most influential television ads

in history and one in which we begin to see the hero-villain scenario playing out in Jobs's approach to messaging. The television ad, 1984, introduced Macintosh to the world. It ran only once, during the January 22 Super Bowl that same year. The Los Angeles Raiders were crushing the Washington Redskins,but more people remember the spot than the score. Introducing the antagonist (the problem) rallies the audience around the hero (the solution). Jobs structures his most exciting presentations around this classic storytelling device.

Obey The Ten Minutes Rule

Your audience checks out after ten minutes. Not in eleven minutes, but ten. We know this valuable fact thanks to new research into cognitive functioning. Simply put, the brain gets bored. According to molecular biologist John Medina, "The brain seems to be making

choices according to some stubborn timing pattern, undoubtedly influenced by both culture and gene."1 Medina says peer-reviewed studies confirm the ten-minute rule, as do his

own observations. In every college course Medina teaches, he asks the same question: "Given a class of medium interest, not too boring and not too exciting, when do you start glancing at

the clock, wondering when the class will be over?" The answer is always exactly the same-ten minutes.

Deliver the Experience

Steve Jobs does not deliver a presentation. He offers an experience. This is illustrated in Further Points.

Channel Their Inner Zen.

Simplification is a key feature in all of Apple's designs. Jobs applies the same

approach to the way he creates his slides. Every slide is simple, visual, and engaging. Simplicity is one of the most important concepts in all Apple designs-from computers, to music players, to phones, and even to the retail store experience. "As technology becomes more complex, Apple's core strength of knowing how to make very sophisticated technology comprehensible to mere mortals is in ever greater demand. Jobs makes products easy to use by eliminating features and clutter. This process of simplification translates to the way Jobs designs his slides as well. "It's laziness on the presenter's part to put everything on one slide," writes Nancy Duarte.3 Where most presenters add as many words as possible to a slide, Jobs removes and removes and removes. A Steve Jobs presentation is strikingly simple, visual, and devoid of bullet points. That's right-no bullet points. Ever. Of course, this raises the question, would a PowerPoint presentation without bullets still be a PowerPoint presentation? The answer is yes, and a much more interesting one. New research into cognitive functioning-how the brain works-proves that bullet points are the least effective way to deliver important information.Neuroscientists are finding that what passes as a typical

presentation is usually the worst way to engage your audience. He is, however, in favor of ditching the use of "ubiquitous" bulleted-list templates found in both PowerPoint and Keynote. "And it's long past time that we realized that putting the same information on a slide in text form that is coming out of our mouths usually does not help-in fact,

it hurts our message.

Dress Up Your Numbers

Data is meaningless without context. Jobs makes statistics come alive and, most important, discusses numbers in a context that is relevant to his audience. Every industry has numbers, and nearly every presenter in every industry fails to make numbers interesting and meaningful. For the rest of this scene, let's examine several examples of individuals

and companies who have accomplished what Jobs does in every presentation-make numbers meaningful.

Usage of Amazing Zippy Words

Jobs speaks in simple, clear, and direct language, free of the jargon and complexity so common in business communications. Jobs is one of the few business leaders who could confidently call a product "amazingly zippy." In an interview for Fortune magazine,

he was asked to describe the interface of Apple's new OS X operating system. "We made the buttons on the screen look so good, you'll want to lick them," he said.2 Even if you think Jobs is grandstanding from time to time, his choice of words puts a smile on your face. He chooses words that are fun, tangible, and uncommon in most professional business presentations. Of course, you should use words that authentically represent your service, brand, or product. A financial adviser recommending a mutual fund to a client would appear insincere (and probably dishonest) if he or she said, "This new mutual fund will revolutionize the financial industry as we know it. It's amazing, and you need to invest your money in it right now." Instead, the financial adviser could say, "Mutual funds are amazing products that will help your money grow while lowering your risk. There are thousands of funds available, but I'm especially excited about a new one. Let me tell you more about it . . ." In the latter statement, our financial adviser has chosen words that are simple and emotional while still maintaining his or her professionalism and integrity.Don't be afraid of using simple words.

and descriptive adjectives.

If you genuinely find a product "amazing," go ahead and say so. After all, if you're not excited about it, how do you expect the rest of us to be? Mission statements are the worst culprits of jargon creep. Mission statements typically are long, convoluted, jargon-laden

paragraphs created in multiple committee meetings and destined to be forgotten. They are replete with jargon and murky words you will rarely hear from Jobs, such as "synergy," "principlecentered," and "best of breed." These expressions are nonsense, yet on any given day, employees in companies around the world are sitting in committee meetings to see just how many such words can be crammed into a single sentence.

Share The Stage

The case study remains an important marketing tool. Most of us are familiar with white papers or simple case studies featured on a company's website, but as video and audio

become much less expensive to create and distribute online, some innovative companies are tapping into the power of YouTube to deliver customer evidence. Buying a Flip video recorder, creating an inexpensive video of a customer testimonial, and posting it on YouTube carries as much weight as a slick marketing production. Posting video and audio testimonials on your site and incorporating them into your presentations will add another valuable layer of authenticity and credibility to your story. If you are a business owner or an entrepreneur, it is important to develop a list of customers you can use as references. In fact, a customer who offers a testimonial is worth more than one who doesn't. Look for customers who will help you win new customers. Then, give them a reason to offer a reference. This could be as simple as offering a deeper relationship with your company, such as providing more access to you or your staff when your customer has questions. Other benefits might include access to product teams, input into new designs or products, and visibility. Give your partners a reason to participate, and once they do, incorporate them into your presentations. Most customers

will not be available for your presentation, but try the next best thing: insert a video testimonial into your presentation. It might not have the same impact as Paul Otellini appearing on stage with Jobs, but it might give you a step up on your competitors.

Stage Your Presentation With Props

Demonstrations play a very important supporting role in every Jobs presentation. Learn how to deliver demos with pizzas.

Refine and Rehearse

This final step is essential for anyone who wants to talk, walk, and

look like a leader. It Includes following steps:

Master Stage Presence.

How you say something is as important as what you say, if not more so. Body language

and verbal delivery account for 63 to 90 percent of the impression you leave on your audience, depending upon which studyyou cite. Steve Jobs's delivery matches the power of his words.One must have commanding Presence. One's voice, gestures, and body language should communicate authority,confidence, and energy.The words one verbally emphasized in his presentation are in italics.The words one uses to describe a product are obviously

important, but so is the style in which he delivers the words. He should punches key words in every paragraph, adding extra emphasis to the most important words in the sentence. One must make expansive gestures to complement his vocal delivery. We'll examine his body language and vocal delivery more closely later in the chapter, but for now, the best way to appreciate his skill is to call on a guest speaker who pales in comparison.

There must be following qualities while making stage presence:

Eye Contact

Open Posture

Hand Gestures

Say it with Style

Inflection

Pauses

Volume

Rate

Make it look Effortless

Practice isn't the thing you do once you're good.

It's the thing you do that makes you good.

-MALCOLM GLADWELL

Steve Jobs is a master showman, working the stage with precision. Every move, demo, image, and slide is in sync. He appears comfortable, confident, and remarkably

effortless. At least, it looks effortless to the audience. Here's his presentation secret: Jobs rehearses for hours. To be more precise: many, many hours over many, many days. Few speakers rehearse more than Steve Jobs. His preparation time is legendary among the people closest to him. Researchers have discovered exactly how many hours of practice it takes to achieve mastery in a given skill. In this chapter, you'll learn how Jobs confirms these theories and how you can apply them to improve your own presentation skills.

Wear The Appropriate Costume

Jobs has the easiest wardrobe selection in the world: it's the same for all of his presentations. His attire is so well known that even "Saturday Night Live" and "30 Rock" poked some goodnatured fun at him. Learn why it's OK for Jobs to dress the way he does but it could mean career suicide if you follow his lead. Once you invent a product that changes the world, we can talk about dressing down. For now, here's the best wardrobe advice you'll ever hear: always dress a little better than everyone else, but appropriate for the culture.

Toss the Script.

Jobs talks to the audience, not to his slides. He makes strong eye contact because he has

practiced effectively. This chapter will teach you how to practice the right way so you, too, can toss the script.

Have Fun.

Despite the extensive preparation that goes into a Steve Jobs presentation, things don't always go according to plan. Nothing rattles Jobs, because his first goal is to have fun! No matter how much you prepare, something might, and probably will, go differently from how you had planned. Notice that I did not say something will go "wrong." It goes wrong only when you call attention to the issue or you let it ruin the rest of your presentation. People are there to hear you, to learn something new about a product, service, or initiative that could

improve their lives.

Total Plagiarism Threshold(%): 38%

Master Document Text

INTERNAL RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT Name of the Candidate: Karan Upadhyay Enrollment no. : 00780303912 Course: MBA -1 (E) A Batch: 2012-2014 Semester: 1st Semester Subject Name: Business Communication Subject code: MS 111 Topic of assignment: Question 1 Subject Teacher's name: ÿ Ms. Kanica Bathla Date of submission: 15 /10/2012 Question 1 From his products to his presentations, Steve Jobs worked hard to make everything...easy. He presented to the common person like a common person and became a model to millions on how to design and deliver a great presentation. ÿ It has been said , "A Jobs' presentation is like a carefully crafted, well-rehearsed performance that tells a story and shares a vision".ÿDiscuss this statement in the light of planning business presentations? Steve Job s was an American entrepreneur. He is best known as the co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Inc. Apple Inc. Through Apple, he was widely recognized as a charismatic pioneer of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_personal_computers personal computer revolution and for his influential career in the computer and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consumer_electronic consumer electronics fields. Jobs also co-founded and served as chief executive of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixar Pixar Animation Studios ; he became a member of the board of directors of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Walt_Disney_Company The Walt Disney Company in 2006, when Disney acquired Pixar. In the late 1970s, Apple co-founder http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Wozniak Steve Wozniak engineered one of the first commercially successful lines of personal computers, the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_II_series Apple II series . Jobs was among the first to see the commercial potential of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PARC_(company) Xerox PARC 's http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_mouse mouse -driven http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphical_user_interface graphical user interface , which led to the creation of the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Lisa Apple Lisa and, one year later, the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh Macintosh . By introducing the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaserWriter LaserWriter he enabled a revolution called http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desktop_publishing desktop publishing . Jobs Presentations mainly consists of three major topics which really enhances his presentaions and made them world class. They are following points: Create a Story Deliver the Experience Refine and Rehearse. These points are fu r ther explained in very brief manner that how they helps in making the presentations extraordinary. Create a Story Creating the story, the plo t, is the first step to selling your ideas with p ower, persuasion, and charisma. Succeeding at this step s eparates mediocre communicators from extra ordinary ones. Most people fail to think through their stor y. Effective communicators plan effectively, develop compelling messages and headlines, make it easy for their listeners to foll ow the narrative, and introduce a common enemy to build the drama. This includes lot of further illustrating points which we must consider. Plan in Analog Steve Jobs has built a reputation in the digital world of bits and bytes, but he creates stories in the very old world tradition of pen and paper. His presentations are theatrical events intended to generate maximum publicity , buzz , and awe. They contain all of the elements of great plays or movies: conflict, resolution, villains, and heroes. And, in line with all great movie directors, Jobs storyboards the plot before picking up a "camera" (i.e., opening the presentation software). It`s marketing theatre unlike any other. Jobs is closely involved in every detail of a presentation: writing descriptive taglines, creating slides, practicing demos, and making sure the lighting is just right. Jobs take nothing for granted. He does what most top presentation designers recommend: he starts on paper. "There`s just something about paper and pen and sketching out rough ideas in the ` analog world' in the early stages that seems to lead to more clarity and better, more creative results . Think about what happens when you open PowerPoint. A blank format slide appears that conta ins space for words-a title and subtitle. This presents a problem . There are very few words in a Steve Jobs presentation. Now thin k about the first thing you see in the drop-down menu und er Format: Bullets & Numbering. This leads to the second problem . There are no bullet points in a Steve Jobs presentation. The softw are itself forces you to create a template that represents the exact opposite of what you need to speak like Steve! In fact, as you will learn in later scenes, texts and bullets are the least effec tive way to deliver information intended to be recalled a nd acted upon. Save your bullet points for grocery lists. Visually engaging presentati ons will inspire your audience. And yes, they require a bit of work, especia lly in the planning phase. As a communicati ons coach, I work with CEOs and other top executives on their media, presentation, and public speaking skills. Answer the One Question That Matters Most. During the planning phase of you r presentation, always remember that it's not about you. It's ab out them. The listeners in your audience are asking themselves one question-" Why should I care?" Answering that one ques tion right out of the gate will grab people's attention and keep them engaged. Answer the one question in all of your marketing materials: website , presentation slides, and press releases. The people who should know better-pub lic relations professionals-are often the worst violators of this rule. The majority of press releases are usually self-in dulgent, buzzword-filled wastes of time. Few members of the press even read press releases, because the documents fail to answer the one question that matters most to a reporter -Why should my readers care? As a journalist, I've seen thousand s of press releases and rarely, if ever, covered a story based on one. Most other journalists would concur. Create Headlines C reate headlines that are spe cific, are memorable, and, best of all, can fit in a Twitter post. T witter is a fast-growing social networking site that could best be described as your life between e-mail and blogs. Millions of users "tweet" about the daily happenings in their lives and can choose to follow the happenings of others. Twitter is changing the nature of business communicat ion in a fundamental way-it fo rces people to write concisely. The maximum post-or tweet- is 140 characters. Characters include letters, spaces, and punctuation. Draw a Road Map . It is well established that we can hold only small amounts of information in short-term, or "active," memory. Comedians know that thr ee is funnier than two. Writers know that three is more dramatic than four. Jobs draws a verbal road map for his audience, a preview of coming attractions. Typically these road maps are outlined in groups of three-a presentat ion might be broken into "three acts," a product description int o "three features," a demo into "three parts." Jobs's love of threes can be traced back at least as early as the original Macintosh introduction on January 24, 1984. Appearing at the Flint Ce nter , in Cupertino, California, Jobs told the audience, "There have only been two milestone Products in our industry: the Apple II in 1977 and the IBM PC in 1981. Today we are introduci ng the third industry milestone product, the Macintosh. And it has turned out insanely great!" 2 Verbal guideposts serve as road maps, helping your listeners Follow the story. When coaching clients to appear in the media, I always instruct them to create an easy-to-follow story by clearly outlining three or, at the most, four main points before filling in the details. When this technique is followed, reporters will often take extensive notes. If t he spokesperson misses a point, reporters will ask, "Didn't you say you had three points? I hea rd only two." A verbal road map of three things will help your listeners keep their place. Introduce the Antagonist In every classic story, the hero fights the villain. The same storytelling outline applie s to world-class presentations. Steve Jobs establishes the foundation of a persuasive story by introducing his audienc e to an antagonist, an enemy, a problem in need of a soluti on. In 1984, the enemy was "Big Blue." Apple is behind one of the most influential television ads in history and one in which we begin to see the hero-villa in scenario playing out in Jobs's approa ch to messaging. The television ad, 1984, introduced Maci ntosh to the world. It ran only once, during the January 22 Super Bowl that same year. The Los Angeles Raiders were cr ushing the Washington Redskins , but more people remember the spot than the score. Introducing the antagonist (the problem) rallies the audience around the hero (the solution). Jo bs structures his most exciting presentations around this classic storytelling device. Obey The Ten Minutes Rule Your audience checks out after ten minutes. Not in eleven minutes, but ten. We know this valuable fact thanks to new resea rch into cognitive functioning. Simply put, the brain get s bored. According to molecular biologist John Medina, "The brain seems to be making choices according to some stubb orn timing pattern, undoubtedly influenced by both culture and gene."1 Medina says peer-reviewed studies confirm the ten-minute rule, as do his own observations. In every co llege course Medina teaches, he asks the same question: "Given a class of medium interest, not too boring and not too exciting, when do you start glancing at the clock, wondering when the class will be over?" The answer is always exactly the same-ten minutes. Deliver the Experience Steve Jobs does not deliver a presentation. He offers an experience. This is illustrated in Further Points. Channel Their Inner Zen. Simplification is a key feature in all of Apple's designs. Jobs applies the same approach to the way he creates his slides. Every slide is simple, visual, and engaging. Simplicity is one of the most important concepts in all Apple designs-from computers, to music players, to phones, and even to the retail s tore experience. "As technology becomes more co mplex, Apple's core strength of knowing how to make very sophisti cated technology comprehensible to mere mortals is in ever greater demand . Jobs makes products easy to use by eliminating features and clutter. This process of simplification translates to the way Jobs designs his slides as well. "It's laziness on the presenter's part to put everything on one slide," writes Nancy Duarte.3 Where most presenters add as many words as possible to a slide, Jobs removes and removes and removes. A Steve Jobs presentation is strikingly simple, visual, and devoid of bullet points. That's right-no bullet points. Ever. Of course, this raises the question, would a PowerPoint presentation without bullets still be a PowerPoint presentation? The answer is yes, and a much more interesting one. New research into cognitive functioning-how the brain works-proves that bullet points are the least effective way to deliver important information.Neuroscientists are finding that what passes as a typical presentation is usually the worst way to engage your audience. He is, however, in favor of ditching the use of "ubiquitous" bullet ed-list templates found in both PowerPoint and Keynote. "And it's long past time that we realized that putting the same info rmation on a slide in text form that is coming out of our mouths usually does not help-in fact, it hurts our message . Dress Up Your Numbers Data is meaningless without context. Jobs makes statistics come alive and, most important, discusses numbers i n a context that is relevant to his audience. Every industry has numbers, and nearly every presenter in every industry fails to make numbers interesting and meaningful. For the rest of this scene, let's examine several examples of individuals and companies who have accomplished what Jobs does in every presentation-make numbers meaningful. Usage of Amazing Zippy Words Jobs speaks in simple, clear, and direct language, free of the jargon and complexity so com mon in business communications. Jobs is one of the few business lea ders who could confidently call a product "amazingly zippy." In an interview for Fortune magazine, he was asked to describe th e interface of Apple's new OS X operating system. "We made th e buttons on the screen look so good, you'll want to lick them," he said.2 Even if you think Jobs is grandstanding from time to t ime, his choice of words puts a smile on your face. He chooses wo rds that are fun, tangible, and uncommon in most professional business presentations. Of course, you should use wor ds that authentically represent your service, brand, or product. A financial adviser recommending a mutual fund to a cli ent would appear insincere (and probably dishonest) if he or she s aid, "This new mutual fund will revolutionize the financial indust ry as we know it. It's amazing, and you need to invest your money in i t right now." Instead, the financial adviser could say, "Mutual funds are amazing products that will help your money grow while lowering your risk. There are thousands of fund s available, but I'm especially excited about a new one. Let me tell you more abo ut it . . ." In the latter statement, our financia l adviser has chosen words that are simple and emotional while still maintai ning his or her professionalism and integrity. Don't be afraid of using simple words . and descriptive adjectives. If you genuinely find a product "amazing," go ahead and say so. After all, if you're not exci ted about it, how do you expect the rest of us to be? Mission statements are the worst culprits of jargon creep. Mission statements typically are long, convoluted, jargon -laden paragraphs created in multiple committee meetings and destined to be forgotten. They are repl ete with jargon and murky words you will rarely hear from Jobs, such as "synergy," " principlecentered ," and "best of breed." These expres sions are nonsense, yet on any given day, employee s in companies around the world are sitting in committee mee tings to see just how many such words can be crammed into a single sentence. Share The Stage The case study remains an important marketing tool. Most of us are familiar with whit e papers or simple case studies featured on a company's website, but as video and audio become much less expensive t o create and distribute online, some innovative companie s are tapping into the power of YouTube to deliver customer evidence. Buying a Flip video recorder, creating an inexpensive video of a customer testimonial, and posting it on YouTube carries as much weight as a slick marketing prod uction. Posting video and audio testimonials on your site and incorporating them into you r presentations will add another valuable layer of authenticity and credibility to your story. If you are a business owner or a n entrepreneur, it is important to develop a list of custo mers you can use as references. In fact, a customer who offers a testim onial is worth more than one who doesn't. Look for customers who will help you win new customers. Then, give them a reason to offer a reference. This could be as simple as offe ring a deeper relationship with your company, such as provi ding more access to you or your staff when your customer has questions. Other benefits might include access to product t eams, input into new designs or products, and visibility. Give your partners a reason to participate, and onc e they do, incorporate them into your presentations. Most customers will not be available for your pres entation, but try the next best thing: insert a video testimonial i nto your presentation. It might not have the same impact as Paul Otellini appearing on stage with Jobs, but it might give you a step up on your competitors. Stage Your Presentation With Props Demonstrations play a very important supporting role in every Jobs presentation. Learn h ow to deliver demos with pizzas . Refine and Rehearse This final step is essential for anyone who wants to talk, walk, and look like a leader. It Includes following steps: Master Stage Presence. How you say something is as important as what you say, if not more so. Body language and verbal delivery account for 63 to 90 percent of the impression you leave on your audience, depending upo n which study you cite. Steve Jobs's delivery matches the power of his words. One must have commanding Presence. One's voice, gestures, and body language should commun icate authority, confidence , and energy. The words one verbally emphasized in his presentation are in italics. The words one uses to describe a product are obviously important , but so is the style in which he delivers the words. He should punches key words in every p aragraph, adding extra emphasis to the most imp ortant words in the sentence. One must make expa nsive gestures to complement hi s vocal delivery. We'll examine his body language and vocal del ivery more closely later in the chapter, but for now, the best way to appreciate his skill is to call on a guest speaker who pales in comparison. There must be following qualities while making stage presence: Eye Contact Open Posture Hand Gestures Say it with Style Inflection Pauses Volume Rate Make it look Effortless Practice isn't the thing you do once you're good. It's the thing you do that makes you good. - MALCOLM GLADWELL S teve Jobs is a master showman, working the stage with precision. Every mov e, demo, image, and slide is in sync. He appears comfortable, confident, and remarkably effortless . At least, it looks effortless to the audience. Here's his presentation secret: Jobs rehearses for hours. To be more precise: many, many hours over many, many days. Few speakers rehearse more than Steve Jobs. His preparation time is legendary among the people closest to him. Researchers have discovered exactly how many hours of practice it takes to achieve mastery in a given skill. In this chapter, you'll learn how Jobs confirms these theories and how you can apply them to improve your own presentation skills. Wear The Appropriate Costume Jobs has the easiest wardrobe selection in the world: it's the same for all of his presentations. His at tire is so well known that even "Saturday Night Live" and " 30 Rock" poked some goodnatured fun at him. Learn why it 's OK for Jobs to dress the way he does but it could mean career suicide if you follow his lead. Once you invent a product that changes the world, we can talk about dressing down. Fo r now, here's the best wardrobe advice you'll ever hear: always dres s a little better than everyone else, but appropriate for the culture. Toss the Script. Jobs talks to the audience, not to his slides. He makes strong eye contact because he has practiced effectively. This chapter will teach you how to practice the right way so you, too, can toss the script. Have Fun. Despite the extensive preparation that goes into a Steve Jobs pr esentation, things don't always go according to plan. Nothing rattles Jobs, because his first goal is to have fun! No matter how much you prepare, something might, and probably will, go differently from how you had planned. Notice that I did not say something will go "wrong." It goes wrong only when you call attention to the issue or you let it ruin the rest of your presentation. People are there to hear you, to learn something new about a product, service, or initiative that could improve their lives . 11

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