Findings And Analysis Of Methodologically English Language Essay

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In this chapter, researcher measured and displayed data collected from both methodologies in the form of tables of figures which show the percentage, frequency, ration and description. After showing all the findings, researcher discussed and compared the findings before concluding the analysis.

Methodologically, the present study is quantitative nature. " It helps measure the extent of students' awareness of reading strategies through an examination of the frequencies and variances of strategy use (Zhang, 2009.p.44)."

All the data was analyzed by using frequency and percentage measurements. Based on the research question, it tries to investigate what kinds of reading strategies do respondents use the most and any differences between the more proficient and the less proficient level students in their use of strategy use.

From this section onward the response, "almost" and "usually" from the respondent, will be group into the same category. The reason is due to the fact that usually and almost both represents the same frequency of an action.

Figure 1: Three proficiency groups among 30 Senior Middle three ESL students

The survey research was conducted among 30 Senior Middle 3 ESL students who studies in Chung Hwa High School, in Malaysia.

The findings in Figure 1 showed that there were more low-proficiency students in the sampling group. The result shoed that there were 14 low-proficiency students, both are 8 students in high-proficiency and intermediate. The participants consisted of almost all Chinese and English as their second language. In addition, ages of participants are 18 years old.

The percentage measurement was used to check whether these differences were statically significant between high-proficiency and less proficiency students overall strategy use.

4.1.1 The use of Global Strategies by ESL's students

Figure2: Percentage of Global Strategies used by SM3 students

From figure 2, it shows the percentage use of Global Reading Strategies (GLOB) by the participants. 42% of the participants do not prefer and use GLOB strategies and 36% of the participants use these strategies often when reading in English.

In this section, 12 questions had been asked in the questionnaire. Each questions are based on GLOB strategies, the users are intentionally, carefully planned techniques and monitor or manage their reading. Each strategy will be analyzed one by one by the figures and tables. It shows all the findings, researcher discussed the findings and concluding the analysis with PROB and SUP strategies.

Question 1: I have a purpose in mind when I read

Figure 3

In this question, respondents are required to answer if they have a purpose in mind when they are reading.

From the figure 3, indicates that all respondents are not regular using this strategy. Among the 14 low-proficiency respondents, there are 4 respondents do not use this strategy when they are reading. And 7 respondents use it occasionally. Lastly, 3 respondents use this strategy sometimes.

Carry on to the intermediate respondents, 5 options have been selected equally by them. 2 respondents never use this strategy and 2 respondents only use it occasionally. Again, another 2 respondents use this strategy when it is necessary. Finally, there are 1 respondent usually use this strategy and 1 respondents use it all the time.

On the other group, the 4 high-proficiency respondents usually use this strategy, 2 respondents have used it occasionally, and another 2 used it under special circumstances. Lastly, 1 respondent never used this strategy when he is reading in English.

Question 2: I think about whether the content of the text fits my reading purpose

Figure 4

In this question, is asked on whether the respondents think about the content of the text fits their reading purpose.

Among 14 low proficiency respondents, out of 10 respondents have occasionally used this strategy, but there is 2 respondents never use the strategy while reading. Besides, only 2 respondents use it sometimes.

Carry on to the intermediate group, 2 respondents always think about the content of the text, to fit their reading, but also 3 respondents do it sometimes. However, this strategy is used occasionally by 2 respondents when it is necessary. And 1 of the respondent react that who never use this strategy while reading in English.

Lastly, 4 of the high-proficiency respondents have usually used the strategy, and 4 respondents show that they use this strategy sometimes.

Question 3: I review the text to know about its length, organization and main idea

Figure 5

This question asked the respondents whether review the text to know about its length, organization and main idea. The respondents can organize the content of a text to grasp the main idea.

Among the 14 low-proficiency respondents, 3 respondents do not use this strategy in reading and 6 respondents use this strategy occasionally. And there are 4 respondents use this strategy when it is necessary. Lastly, only 1 respondent has usually used this strategy.

Move to intermediate group, 4 respondents use this strategy under special circumstances, and 2 respondents occasionally use it, and 2 respondents usually use this strategy when reading in English.

In high-proficiency group, 4 respondents have used this strategy often. And 3 respondents use this strategy when it is necessary and only 1 respondent has occasionally used the strategy.

Question 4: When reading, I decide what to read closely and what to ignore

Figure 6

This question is asked whether the respondents decide what have to closely and what have to ignore when they are reading in English. These strategies are "skimming and scanning". Skimming is used to quickly identify the main ideas of a text. Moreover, scanning is a technique readers often use when looking up a word in passage.

This finding showed that 4 respondents from low-proficiency group never used this strategy while reading in English. Moreover, 6 respondents have occasionally used this strategy, and 3 respondents use it sometimes when it is necessary. 1 respondent do use this strategy often.

On the other hand, most of the high-proficiency and intermediate students usually decide what to read closely and what to ignore when they reading. Skimming and scanning are usually used by 13 respondents. Those are from high-proficiency and intermediate group. This strategy is used sometimes by 2 respondents, each from 2 different groups. Lastly, the result also showed that only 1 respondent from intermediate group who is never used this strategy when he is reading.

Question 5: I use my prior knowledge to help me understand what I read

Figure 7

This finding showed that, 5 intermediate and 7 high-proficiency respondents usually use prior knowledge to help them understand in reading. And 1 high-proficiency respondents and 3 intermediate use this strategy sometimes when it is necessary.

On the other hand, 4 low-proficiency respondents do not use prior knowledge to help them understand when they are reading in English. The majority which is constitutes 10 low-proficiency respondents are sometimes used their prior knowledge.

According to Block (1986) stated "the readers used their knowledge and experience to explain, extend, and clarify content. That is why the readers may use information from their own lives to clarify or extend ideas in reading."

Question 6: I use tables, figures, and pictures in text to increase my understanding

Figure 8

This question is asking if the respondents use tables, figures, and pictures in text to increase their understanding. This strategy is the readers look at tables, figures and pictures and find out the meaning which is related to the text.

From the result, 11 out of 14 low-proficiency respondents usually use this strategy and 3 respondents are used sometimes. As we can see from the Figure 8, this strategy has been sufficiently used by the respondents.

Carry on to the high-proficiency group, 6 out of 8 respondents are used this strategy often, and 1 respondent is used sometimes if necessary, lastly, 1 respondent is used occasionally.

Among 8 intermediate respondents, 5 respondents are used this strategy often, 2 respondents are used sometimes and 1 respondent is used this strategy occasionally when it is necessary.

Question 7: I use context clues to help me better understand what I am reading

Figure 9

This question asked whether the respondents use context clues to help them better understand what they are reading. As mentioned by Block (1986), this strategy called "anticipate content", "the reader predicts what content will occur in succeeding portions of text."They could guess the story and help them better understand.

The result in Figure 9 showed that majorities 9 of the low-proficiency respondents use this strategy occasionally when under special circumstances. And there are 3 respondents never use this strategy and only 1 respondent use sometimes if necessary.

Carry on to the intermediate group, the options have been selected average. 2 respondents use this strategy often and 3 respondents use it all the time. Move another side, only 1 respondent use this strategy under special circumstances and 1 respondent occasionally use this strategy when it is necessary.

Question 8: I use typographical features like bold face and italics to indentify key information

Figure 10

Figure 10 put on view that how many participants use typographical features (like bold face and italics) to indentify key information. It helps readers to distinguish between main ideas and supporting detail.

Among 14 low-proficiency respondents, 6 respondents use this strategy occasionally and 4 respondents never use this strategy when reading in English. Only 1 respondent usually uses this strategy and 3 respondents use it when it is necessary.

However, 5 high-proficiency respondents use this strategy often, and 2 respondents use in particular time and only 1 respondent occasionally use this strategy.

Again, this strategy is used often by intermediate respondents, which are 5 respondents. And 2 respondents use in particular time and only 1 respondent do not use this strategy when reading in English.

Question 9: I check my understanding when I cross across new information

Figure 11

In this question is asked whether the respondents check their understanding when they cross across new information.

From the finding, it showed the strategy is never used by 5 of the respondents, who are low-proficiency in English. Besides, 6 of the respondents have occasionally used the strategy when they are reading. However, 2 respondents use it sometimes, and only 1 respondent react that he usually use to check their understanding when they cross across new information.

On the other side, 5 respondents from high-proficiency group do usually check their understanding when they cross across new information. And the 2 respondents seldom use the strategy and 1 of the respondent never used this strategy when they are reading in English.

Question 10: I try to guess what the content of the text is about when I read

Figure 12

The question is asked if the respondents try to guess what the content of the text is about when they read. This strategy called "inferencing", readers guess unknown meaning using other relevant sources of knowledge or background knowledge to understand the content.

Among 8 high-proficiency respondents, 4 respondent use this strategy all the time and 2 respondent use this often, and 1 respondent use sometimes this strategy when it is necessary for their reading and the another 1 respondent use this strategy occasionally.

Move to low-proficiency group, the result showed that 4 respondents do use this strategy and 1 respondent use it all the time when they are reading. 1 of the respondent uses sometimes this strategy. However, there are 5 of the respondents only occasionally use this strategy and 3 of the respondents never used this strategy while reading.

Lastly, 4 of the intermediate respondents almost use this strategy when they are reading, and 2 respondents use this strategy often. And also found 1 respondent sometimes use this strategy and another respondent only occasionally use this strategy.

Question 11: I check to see if my guesses about the text are right or wrong

Figure 13

In this question is asked whether the respondents check to see if they guess about the text are right or wrong. According to block (1986) readers make an inference, such as draw a conclusion, or form hypothesis about the content.

The finding showed that the distributions of the options are selected equally by each group.

Among high-proficiency group, the strategy is frequently used by 6 respondents. However, 2 respondents have only occasionally used this strategy when reading.

Carry on to intermediate group, 4 of the respondents frequently used this strategy. However, this strategy is use sometimes by 2 respondents and 1 respondent use it occasionally. Lastly, it also found that only 1 respondent never use this strategy in their reading.

Question 12: I critically analyze and evaluate the information presented in the text rather than passively accept everything

Figure 14

This question asked the respondents whether they critically analyze and evaluate the information presented in the text rather than passively accept everything.

Among 14 low-proficiency students, 5 respondents have never used this strategy, and 5 respondents have used it occasionally under special circumstances. However, 2 respondents have sometimes used if necessary. Lastly, only 2 respondents critically analyze when they are reading.

Carry on to high-proficiency group, 6 of the respondents frequently analyze the text when they are reading. However, this strategy is used sometimes by 1 respondent. And 1 respondents use it occasionally when it is necessary for their reading.

On the other side, this strategy is used usually by 4 intermediate respondents. However, 2 respondents use this strategy sometimes and 1 respondent use this strategy occasionally. Lastly, 1 respondent passively accept the information from the text.

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