All Classes Of Certifications English Language Essay

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Describe the qualification, privileges and limitations of all classes of certification to include pilot, maintenance, avionics, dispatch, and air traffic control. The qualifications, privileges, and limitations for pilots are especially varied. These variations are dictated by aircraft type, the outside environment, and the pilots' activities or job. Air Traffic Control follows a very similar pattern to pilot. You a controller must meet a series of training and experience requirements, pass a knowledge test, pass a practical test, possess at least a second class medical certificate, and pass a check ride. The qualifications for dispatcher are listed under part 65 of the Federal Aviation Air Regulations. The qualifications for mechanic are also under Federal Aviation Air Regulations part 65.

All Classes of Certifications

The qualifications, privileges, and limitations for pilots are especially varied. These variations are dictated by aircraft type, the outside environment, and the pilots' activities or job. A way of showing which of these a given pilot is allowed to exercise is through the issuance of a certificate and ratings. These certificates and ratings are listed under part 61 of the Federal Aviation Air Regulations.

Your first step towards qualifying for a new certificate is completing a Federal Aviation Administration Knowledge Test. This usually comes at the end of a ground instruction course. This may be with a school course, or with a certified ground instructor. These sources will give the prospective certificate holder an endorsement that will allow you to take the test. The passing grade is set by the administrator, but typically is at least seventy percent. Following this is acquiring a medical certificate, logging necessary training time, and passing a practical test (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011).

A medical certificate can only be issued by doctors authorized by the Federal Aviation Administration. The purpose is to make sure you the pilot is able to safely perform the tasks involved in flight without endangering themselves, passengers, or people on the ground. Big parts of this are making sure you have full use of sight and hearing, the two most important senses for flight. Additionally there are three classes of medical certificate, each allowing for gradually increased privileges. The third class medical certificate allows a pilot to exercise student pilot, private pilot, recreational pilot, sport pilot, and instructor pilot privileges. A third class medical certificate will expire after sixty months for a person under age forty, or after twenty four months for a person over age forty. A second class medical certificate allows for the exercising of everything a third class medical certificate as well as commercial pilot privileges. This certificate expires after twelve months, but still allows for the exercise of third class privileges for either twelve or forty eight months afterward, depending on if you the pilot is over forty or under forty years of age. A first class medical certificate allows for the exercise of an airline transport pilot certificate. This medical class also expires after twelve months, or six months if you the pilot is over forty years of age (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011).

Acquiring the necessary flight time to earn respective certificates and ratings can seem like a daunting task. Not only are there requirements for acquiring the certificate, but requirements to continue to exercise the full privileges of that certificate. To continue to use any earned certificate or rating you the pilot must do one of three things within 24 months of the previous certificate. You must earn another certificate or rating, you must pass a biannual flight review, or you must complete part of the Federal Aviation Administration s wings program. Doing any of these allows you to keep exercising the privileges of your certificates (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011).

The qualifications for a student pilot certificate are fairly simple. The student must be at least 16 years of age and able to speak, read, write, and English. Also a class three medical certificate is needed. In fact the certificate and the medical are combined into the same physical document. A student pilot will always have another pilot with them who has a private pilot certificate or above. Student pilots can only fly solo with an instructor's pilot. A student pilot must never be in command of an aircraft, if flying for compensation or hire, furthering business, carrying passengers, visibility drops below three statue miles in the day and five statue miles at night, or if the conditions outside fall below visual flight rules conditions. Student pilots are also limited by any other restrictions place on them by their instructor (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011).

The qualifications for a private pilot are very similar to the ones that were required for the student pilot, but with the addition of a log proving you completed the training outlined in Federal Aviation Air Regulations 61.107 and Federal Aviation Air Regulations 61.109. You must also be at least seventeen years of age, and have a minimum of 35-40 hours of flight time, in addition to 20 hours of instruction and 10 hours of solo flight and have an endorsement from their instructor and passed their knowledge test. The privileges of private pilot are the ability to carry passengers as long as the cost is split equally among all parties, the ability to fly solo, and the ability to carry passengers at night as long as the pilot is night current, the ability to fly for charities, flying to aid in search and rescue, to demonstrate aircraft as a salesman, and flying for a government organization. A private pilot may fly for hire if it is incidental to business and there are no passengers or property onboard (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011). The limitations for a private pilot are partly dependent on what additional ratings and endorsements you have. Private pilots may not fly for hire unless you fall under the above exception. If you lack an instrument rating you can't fly in instrument flight rules conditions. If you don't have their night endorsement and keep it current you cannot carry passengers at night (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011). Private pilots must have a current Class III medical exam, which must be renewed every 24 or 60 months (depending on age). In addition private pilots must revalidate their pilot certificates every 24 months by undertaking a flight review with a certificated flight instructor

The qualifications for a commercial pilot once again build upon the previous two certificates. For this certificate a pilot must be 18 years of age, with no less than 250 hours of flight time (190 hours accelerated curriculum defined in Part 141 of the Federal Aviation Regulations), which will includes 100 hours in powered aircraft, and 50 hours in airplanes, and with 100 hours as pilot commander 50 hours must be cross country flight time. However, a commercial pilots will hold an instrument rating, or be restricted to fly for hire only in daylight, under flight rules, within 50 miles of the originating airport, must have a second class medical, passed the training requirements in Federal Aviation Air Regulations 61.125 and 61.127, as well as the experience requirements in 61.129. You must also have at least a private pilot's license. The privileges for commercial pilot are much greater than private pilot. A commercial pilot is allowed to fly for hire, as long as you are flying under private carriage. Commercial pilots are not allowed to fly common carriage flight, but may do so under someone else. Also, without an instrument rating a commercial pilot is not allowed to transport passengers more than fifty miles from their base of operations, or at night (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011).

The qualifications for airline transport pilots are much more stringent than the previous certificates. An airline transport pilots must have a commercial certificate with an instrument rating, must be at least twenty three years old, with no less than a 1,500 hours of flight time, with 500 hours being cross-country flight time, along with a 100 hours of night flying, and 75 hours in a simulated instrument flight conditions. You as an airline transport pilots will have thousands of hours of flight time. You also will have a commercial certificate and an instrument rating. You will have a current and more stringent Class I medical exam, which renew every six months or one year (depending on your age). Therefore, all pilots must revalidate their certificates every 24 months with a flight review and must be of good moral character. You also must possess a first class medical, passed the training requirements listed under Federal Aviation Air Regulations 61.155 and 61.157 and met the experience requirements under 61.159. A pilot with an airline transport pilot's certificate may participate in common carriage practices and may also train and endorse other pilots in earning their airline transport pilots certificate (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011).

The practical test is commonly referred to as a "check ride." This practical test encompasses most of the knowledge you the pilot can be expected to use in the exercise of their certificate as well as most of the maneuvers you might perform. It frequently comes in two parts, an oral and knowledge testing on the ground and a practical test of abilities in the air, though the instructor may still ask you (student) questions while flying. Each check ride has a series of line items that must be completed by you prior to the issuance of a certificate. These line items can be found in the Practical Test Standards books. Your failure in one part may not necessarily halt a flight and you might be given an opportunity to continue on in the interest of completing other line items. A flight can be discontinued at either by you or examiners discretion and items passed will transfer to the next attempt as long as you take the test again within sixty days. (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011)

The qualifications for a Sport Pilot certificate you must be at least 17 years of age speak, read and write and understand English. Log 20 or more hours of flight time of which you need. You need at least 15 hours of dual instruction with a qualified flight instructor two hours with dual instruction with a qualified flight instructor and five hours must be solo flight. You must fly one solo cross country flight over a total distance of 75 or more nautical miles to two different destinations to a full stop landing. One leg of this cross country will be over a total distance of 25 nautical miles. You will need to received three hours of dual instruction in the preceding 50 days and pass a written and practical test and have a state drivers license that cannot be rejected form your last Airman Medical Certificate or have a current third class or higher Airman Medical Certificate.

Air Traffic Control follows a very similar pattern to pilot. You a controller must meet a series of training and experience requirements, pass a knowledge test, pass a practical test, possess at least a second class medical certificate, and pass a check ride. These requirements are fully detailed under FAR part 65.

Qualification for this certificate bears much similarity to other certificates. You must be at least eighteen years old, be of good moral character, and must able to speak read, write, understand, English, without any trace of accent or speech impediment. Your privileges and limitations of Air Traffic Control are dictated by a controller's time at the station, as well as what operations ratings you have earned. You must pass the practical test for each rating before you perform that duty (Federal Aviation Administration, 2011).

An airline dispatcher once again follows the same pattern. The qualifications for dispatcher are listed under part 65 of the Federal Aviation Air Regulations. You the dispatcher have to be able to speak, read, write, and understand English, fulfill the training requirements under Federal Aviation Air Regulations 65.55 and 65.59, and must be at least 21years of age to take the knowledge test, but 23 years of age to actually earn the certificate. Your privileges and limitations of a dispatch certificate are the ability to assist with tracking and progress of the flight of the airplane. Your certification is where the airline is base and you the pilot are responsible for the safety of the flight. The country which you are licensed in must be approved through the aviation authority of that country. You must have extensive knowledge in the aviation career field, comparable to the holder of an airline transport pilot license.

You share responsibility that adds a layer of checks and balances to operation of the aircraft and greatly improves safety. In the United States, as licensed flight dispatchers you have to have extensive aviation knowledge the same as Airline Transport Pilot License holders (the Federal Aviation Administration written exam and the Federal Aviation Administration Dispatcher written exam are identical).

United States, the dispatching duties and responsibilities are designated to flight followers. The main difference between a flight dispatcher and a flight follower is that the latter does not share legal responsibility for the operation of a flight. Also, followers are not required to attain a flight dispatcher's license, although you are usually encouraged to do so.

An aircraft mechanic falls into the same pattern. The qualifications for mechanic are also under Federal Aviation Air Regulations part 65. A mechanic must be eighteen years of age, be able to read, write, speak, and understand English, and pass all of his prescribed tests within twenty four months of the rating he seeks. A mechanics privileges are dictated by what ratings you has sought to earn, but generally encompass all basic preventative maintenance, the ability to supervise maintenance, and may do a repairs that have already been approved by a rated mechanic or administrator. Some limitations are that these repairs must be on the aircraft you are rated for, and as a mechanic must understand the directions and manuals provided by the manufacturer before you can make any repairs.

Conclusion

Describe the qualification, privileges and limitations of all classes of certification to include pilot, maintenance, avionics, dispatch, and air traffic control. The qualifications, privileges, and limitations for pilots are especially varied. These variations are dictated by aircraft type, the outside environment, and the pilots' activities or job. Air Traffic Control follows a very similar pattern to pilot. You a controller must meet a series of training and experience requirements, pass a knowledge test, pass a practical test, possess at least a second class medical certificate, and pass a check ride. The qualifications for dispatcher are listed under part 65 of the Federal Aviation Air Regulations. The qualifications for mechanic are also under Federal Aviation Air Regulations part 65.

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