works as a team and contribute fairly

Published:

This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

The theme of my literature unit is the solar system. I developed this unit to be used with my current class of fifth grade students. I developed this literature unit to be used simultaneously with, or after, science content lessons related to the solar system. I thought developing a literature-based unit to integrate with science lessons would be a great way to increase students' exposure to the topic.

As mentioned above, this unit was designed to be used simultaneously, if not after, lessons based in strictly science content. It is my personal belief that the solar system is too in-depth a topic to be taught through literature alone, and should also be taught with experimentation, observation, etc. This particular unit should be introduced after students have had some preliminary lessons on the individual planets and the solar system as a whole. This background knowledge will be important as they begin the literature unit.

This particular literature unit was designed to strengthen students' knowledge on the solar system, and more specifically, the planets. In this unit, students will explore the planets as a whole and then focus in on particular planets as they move throughout the unit. The unit was created to appeal to a variety of learning styles, is interactive and will motivate students to expand their knowledge of the topic.

The unit begins with a read aloud of Seymour Simon's Our Solar System. The teacher will stop periodically to discuss with students how the book compares and contrasts with what they have learned thus far in their science lessons on the solar system. After the entire book has been read, students will be asked to select a planet they find interesting, and create a postcard from that planet. This creative writing task encourages students to incorporate prior knowledge of the planet, things learned from the recent read aloud, and imaginative details based on these facts. Students will be asked to write these postcards to another student in the classroom as if they are currently living on that particular planet. Once the postcards are complete, students will trade postcards and write a letter back to that person, comparing and contrasting the information about the two planets. For example, one student may write a postcard as if they were living on the planet Mars. That student would trade with a student who wrote a postcard from a different planet, such as Mercury. The two students would exchange postcards and write letters back to each other comparing and contrasting their two planets. All of the while, students will be writing in descriptive, detailed sand creative sentences.

On the second day of the unit, students will begin a two-day, classroom Jigsaw activity. Since I have nineteen students in my classroom and there are eight planets, students will be divided up into groups of 2, with three groups have three members. Each group will be responsible for researching one planet. On the first day of this activity, students will spend time in the computer lab, or on laptops, researching their planet further and filling in their research assignment paper. After all of this information has been collected, students will spend the second day sharing the research they discovered with other members of the class. Eventually, as the students complete the Jigsaw, they will all have gained new information about all eight planets. This research will become extremely beneficial as students progress in the literature unit. This activity also helps develop their research skills, as well as their speaking and listening skills.

After this two-day research activity, students will spend two days analyzing and creating poetry based on the planets of the solar system. On the fourth day of the unit, students will work in small groups reading, analyzing, and comparing a poem on a particular planet to their prior knowledge. These poems will be taken from Jacqueline Mitton and Christina Balit's book, The Planet Gods: Myths and Facts About the Solar System, which compares the planets to the gods from which their name originated. In each group, the students will read the poem and discuss it together, analyzing how this relates to what they have learned in class. Then, the students will create a large Venn diagram comparing the information from the poem to facts they have learned in class. Finally, they will present the diagram to the remaining members of the class and display it in the classroom for future reference.

Similarly, on the fifth day of the literature unit, students will listen to a teacher read aloud from the book The Swamps of Sleethe: Poems From Beyond the Solar System written by Jack Prelutsky and Jimmy Pickering. Unlike Mitton and Balit's book, this collection of poems is fictional and silly. After reading and discussing several poems with students, students will be asked to create their own creative poem about space in any format they chose. Creativity will be most encouraged factor on this assignment. This will also help prepare them for their group assignment that will be introduced the following day.

The remaining lessons in the literature unit will be a research-based assignment in which students will be asked to create a television news broadcast from a particular planet. Each student will be assigned to a group that will focus on a particular planet. Students will be asked to incorporate all of the information they have learned in class about that particular planet, as well as some information they researched independently. Students will have three days to research the planet and turn their knowledge into an entertaining script. Students will perform their broadcast as if they were on live television. The teacher will record these performances and compile them together through video production computer software to make them appear as if they are all apart of news broadcast. The final production will be shown to students in class as a fun way to conclude the unit.

The required materials for this literature unit are:

Books:

Landau, E. (March 2008). Earth (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Mars (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Mercury (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Jupiter (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Neptune (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Pluto: From planet to dwarf (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Saturn (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Uranus (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Venus (True books).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Brightest in the sky: The plant Venus (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Dwarf planets: Pluto, Charon, Ceres, and Eris (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Farthest from the sun: The plant Neptune (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). The largest planet: Jupiter (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Nearest to the sun: The plant Mercury (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Our home planet: Earth (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Ringed giant: The planet Saturn (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Seeing Red: The plant Mars (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). The sideways planet: Uranus (Amazing science: Planets).

Mitton, J. & Balit, C. (November 11, 2008). The planet gods: Myths and facts about the solar system.

Prelutsky, J. & Pickering, J. (Mar 10, 2009). The swamps of sleethe: Poems from beyond the solar system.

Simon, S. (May 8, 2007). Our solar system (Revised edition).

Materials (Not normally found in the classroom):

Large, white index cards

Poster paper

Access to a computer lab or laptops for each student in the class

Video camera

Video production software

Jeopardy template for Microsoft PowerPoint

The goals and objectives for this unit are:

Students will incorporate their background knowledge of the planets of the solar system to form creative writing pieces

Students will differentiate between fact, opinion and fictional text and incorporate all three in a creative writing piece

Student will then compare and contrast two sources of information that include fact, opinion and fictional text

Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

Students will participate in a small group writing and presenting activity incorporating all of their background knowledge on a particular planet

Students will compare and contrast poetry with informational text and their background knowledge

Student will participate in a Venn diagram activity comparing and contrasting a poem with their prior knowledge of a particular planet

Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

Students will gather new information about the planets of the solar system from multiple sources

Students will collect and organize data from multiple sources

Students will take notes to collect and organize their data

Students will compare and contrast their gathered data to determine which is relevant and useful to their task

Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

Students will use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

Students will share information on a particular planet in an appropriate, informative, and interesting format

Students will transform research and prior knowledge into an original literary text

Students will provide appropriate feedback on others' presentations

Assessment of this unit will be done through informal observation, anecdotal notes, and student conferences. Formal assessment will be done through the use of a rubric. These assessments are described in further detail in each individual lesson plan.

The essential knowledge and skills students will gain as a result of this unit are related to literacy, but science as well. Hopefully, at the completion of this unit students will have strengthened their knowledge about the planets of the solar system including:

Their distance from the Sun

The number of moons and rings each has

Basic information about each planet (color, size, etc.)

Furthermore, students will have hopefully gained the following skills:

Ability to work in a group to learn new information

Ability to communicate with one another in print form

Ability to work as a team and contribute fairly and cooperatively

Ability to write a creative, informative script

Ability to compare and contrast two forms of literature, and compare to current schema

Ability to read for new information

Ability to electronically research new information

Ability to write creative poetry

Ability to operate a video camera

Ability to perform a written piece in front of a camera and audience

Ability to praise and critique others' work

This unit relates to the New York State Standards in the areas of English Language Arts and Science. This unit relates to all four ELA standards (and the 2005 Core objectives) as followed:

Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding

Reading Objectives:

Read to collect and interpret data, facts, and ideas from multiple sources

Compare and contrast information on one topic from multiple sources

Recognize how new information is related to prior knowledge or experience

Writing Objectives:

Take notes to record and organize relevant data, facts and ideas with assistance, and use notes as part of prewriting activities

Compare and contrast ideas and information from two sources

Use paragraphing to organize ideas and information, with assistance

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression

Reading Objectives:

Read aloud from a variety of genres; for example, read the lines of a play or recite a poem - use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

Recognize how the author uses literary devices, such as simile, metaphor, and personification, to create meaning

Recognize how different authors treat similar themes

Writing Objectives:

Develop original literary texts that use organizing structures such as stanzas and chapters

Use examples of literary devices, such as rhyme, rhythm, and simile

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation

Reading Objectives:

Evaluate information, ideas, opinions, and themes in texts by identifying a central idea and supporting details; details that are primary and those that are less important; statements of fact, opinion, and exaggeration; missing or unclear information

Writing Objectives:

Use strategies, such as note taking, semantic webbing, or mapping, to plan and organize writing

Use supporting evidence from text to evaluate ideas, information, themes, or experience

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction

Reading Objectives:

Share reading experiences to build a relationship with peers or adults; for example, read together silently or aloud with a partner or in small groups

This literature unit, since it is based on the solar system, also meets the New York State Standard Four. This standard states, "Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science." Specifically, this unit can be related to the Core Curriculum's Major Understandings of the Physical Setting including:

1.1a Earth's Sun is an average-sized star. The Sun is more than a million times greater in volume than Earth.

1.1b Other stars are like the Sun but are so far away that they look like points of light. Distances between stars are vast compared to distances within our solar system.

1.1c The Sun and the planets that revolve around it are the major bodies in the solar system. Other members include comets, moons, and asteroids. Earth's orbit is nearly circular.

1.1g Moons are seen by reflected light. Our Moon orbits Earth, while Earth orbits the Sun. The Moon's phases as observed from Earth are the result of seeing different portions of the lighted area of the Moon's surface. The phases repeat in a cyclic pattern in about one month.

1.1h The apparent motions of the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars across the sky can be explained by Earth's rotation and revolution. Earth's rotation causes the length of one day to be approximately 24 hours. This rotation also causes the Sun and Moon to appear to rise along the eastern horizon and to set along the western horizon. Earth's revolution around the Sun defines the length of the year as 365 1/4 days.

1.1j The shape of Earth, the other planets, and stars is nearly spherical

The remainder of this paper is the ten lesson plans that make up the literature unit:

Lesson Plan One:

Date/Times: Day One, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: A Postcard from my Planet

Goals/Objectives:

Students will incorporate their background knowledge of the planets of the solar system to form creative writing pieces

Students will differentiate between fact, opinion and fictional text and incorporate all three in a creative writing piece

Student will then compare and contrast two sources of information that include fact, opinion and fictional text

Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

Materials:

Large, white index cards

Simon, S. (May 8, 2007). Our solar system (Revised edition).

Introduction to the Lesson:

Explain to students that this is the first of ten lessons in English Language Arts that will relate to the planets of the solar system. Discuss the lessons and activities the students have done thus far in science that will relate to this unit. Have the students volunteer information they already know about the planets of the solar system.

Language Arts Activities:

Begin with a read aloud of Seymour Simon's Our Solar System. The teacher should stop periodically to discuss with students how the book compares and contrasts with what they have learned thus far in their science lessons on the solar system.

After the entire book has been read, students will be asked to select a planet they find interesting, and create a postcard from that planet. (This creative writing task encourages students to incorporate prior knowledge of the planet, things learned from the recent read aloud, and imaginative details based on these facts.)

On one side of the postcard, they are to illustrate something about their planet. On the other side, students will be asked to write these postcards to another student in the classroom as if they are currently living on that particular planet. This should be written in complete sentences and paragraphs.

Once the postcards are complete, students will trade postcards with another student who wrote about a different planet.

This person will read that person's postcard to gain new information.

Review and Summary:

Student will write a letter back to that person, comparing and contrasting the information about the two planets. For example, one student may write a postcard as if they were living on the planet Mars. That student would trade with a student who wrote a postcard from a different planet, such as Mercury. The two students would exchange postcards and write letters back to each other comparing and contrasting their two planets.

Assessment:

Teachers should collect both the postcards and the letters to ensure students incorporated prior knowledge about their specific planet in a creative manner. Teachers should also be assessing if the provided information is facts, rather than fictional details.

Lesson Plan Two:

Date/Times: Day Two, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Planets of the Solar System Jigsaw Activity: Part One

Goals/Objectives:

Students will gather new information about the planets of the solar system from multiple sources

Students will collect and organize data from multiple sources

Students will take notes to collect and organize their data

Students will compare and contrast their gathered data to determine which is relevant and useful to their task

Materials:

Access to a computer lab or laptops for each student in the class

Research worksheets

Introduction to the Lesson:

Discuss with students what sometimes occurs when teachers assign group projects; One student may be doing the majority of the work. Introduce the Jigsaw activity and explain how each member of the group, and each group is a whole, will be responsible for researching new information for our class. Explain in depth how the process will work for the next two days and clear up any misunderstandings.

Language Arts Activities:

Divide students up into equal groups. There should be eight groups all together in the classroom. Each student should have at least one partner.

Explain that each group will be responsible for researching one planet, particularly it's distance from the sun, the number of moons and rings each has, and basic information about each planet (color, size, etc.)

Allow students to spend time in the computer lab, or on laptops, researching their planet further and filling in their research assignment sheets, sheets listing these basic questions and providing space for their answers.

Encourage students to divide up their research tasks and have each member find out something in particular about their designated planet.

Review and Summary:

Make sure each member of the group has completed their research sheet on their assigned planet

Discuss how researching in this manner was different from the type of research they have done in the past.

Did they find out more information when they worked as a group?

Was it helpful to know exactly the information you needed to find out?

Did everyone agree on the facts you had discovered?

Assessment:

Collect students' research sheets to be sure all groups are fully prepared to share tomorrow and completed their assigned task.

Lesson Plan Three:

Date/Times: Day Three, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Planets of the Solar System Jigsaw Activity: Part Two

Goals/Objectives:

Students will gather new information about the planets of the solar system from multiple sources

Students will collect and organize data from multiple sources

Students will take notes to collect and organize their data

Students will compare and contrast their gathered data to determine which is relevant and useful to their task

Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

Students will use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

Students will share information on a particular planet in an appropriate, informative, and interesting format

Materials:

Research worksheets from yesterday's task

Blank booklet to be filled in on all planets' information

Introduction to the Lesson:

Review what students did in yesterday's lesson. Discuss how finding information on one particular planet was much easy than researching all eight planets. Review with students the procedure they will follow for exchanging their newfound information on the planets.

Language Arts Activities:

Ensure that all students have been passed back their research sheets from yesterday and a blank booklet with spaces to fill in the required information about all eight planets.

Have one member from each group rotate around the room sharing the information his/her group gained as a result of yesterday's research. All students sitting at that group are to fill in their space booklets with that new information. (They are not to share information they gained until the end).

Students travel around the room until their traveling group member has been to all seven groups, and their information has been passed on.

Eventually, as the students complete the Jigsaw, they will return to their group and fill in their space booklets according to the information the rest of their group has just be informed of.

Each group should, at the end of the activity, have gained new information about all eight planets.

Review and Summary:

Have students volunteer to share some information they have learned as a result of the Jigsaw. Have students discuss whether they liked the activity, and if they found it beneficial to complete research in this manner. Discuss with students how this research will become extremely beneficial as students progress in the literature unit.

Assessment:

Collect their space booklets and be sure each student has filled in the required information for all eight planets. Store these booklets somewhere in the classroom as they will be crucial later on in the unit, and students might accidentally misplace them.

Lesson Plan Four:

Date/Times: Day Four, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Myth or Truth? About the Planets

Goals/Objectives:

Students will compare and contrast poetry with informational text and their background knowledge

Student will participate in a Venn diagram activity comparing and contrasting a poem with their prior knowledge of a particular planet

Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

Students will use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

Materials:

Mitton, J. & Balit, C. (November 11, 2008). The planet gods: Myths and facts about the solar system.

Introduction to the Lesson:

Ask students where they think planets' names originated. Discuss their possible answers and then introduce the book, The Planet Gods: Myths and Facts about the Solar System. Explain that this book will explain where the planets' names originated and why.

Language Arts Activities:

Teacher should read aloud a selection of Mitton, J. & Balit's, The Planet Gods: Myths and Facts about the Solar System.

The teacher should model finding similarities and differences to facts they have already discussed in class.

Assign students to a small group and explain that students will work in small groups to reading, analyzing, and comparing a poem from the book on a particular planet to their prior knowledge.

In each group, the students will read the poem and discuss it together, analyzing how this relates to what they have learned in class.

Then, the students will create a large Venn diagram comparing the information from the poem to facts they have learned in class.

Review and Summary:

Finally, they will present the diagram to the remaining members of the class and display it in the classroom for future reference.

Assessment:

The teacher should informally assess students' work through observation as they work with their group and as they present their work. The teacher should monitor which students work well together and those that do not as he/she plans for future group work in this unit. The teacher should also monitor any students who are not working up to what is expected, as they become a bigger problem later on the in the unit as well.

Lesson Plan Five:

Date/Times: Day Five, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Poems about the planets

Goals/Objectives:

Students will incorporate their background knowledge of the planets of the solar system to form creative writing pieces

Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

Students will compare and contrast poetry with informational text and their background knowledge

Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

Students will use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

Students will share information on a particular planet in an appropriate, informative, and interesting format

Students will transform research and prior knowledge into an original literary text

Materials:

Prelutsky, J. & Pickering, J. (Mar 10, 2009). The swamps of sleethe: Poems from beyond the solar system.

Introduction to the Lesson:

Discuss yesterday's poems and how some of the information was factual and other was fictional. Have student volunteer the difference between them and give examples from yesterday's poems. Explain that today they will be looking at space poems that are strictly fictional.

Language Arts Activities:

Students will listen to a teacher read aloud from the book The Swamps of Sleethe: Poems From Beyond the Solar System written by Jack Prelutsky and Jimmy Pickering.

After reading and discussing several poems with students, students will be asked to create their own creative poem about space in any format they chose.

Creativity will be most encouraged factor on this assignment, although they should include at least five facts they have learned thus far in their poem.

Review and Summary:

Students will be encouraged to share their poem with the class, although they will not be required. Students will share with their classmates which facts they included and why they thought they were important to their poem.

Assessment:

Students' poems will not be formally assessed. They will just be assessed at the completion of their poem, and the quality of their writing. This will not receive a formal grade, as it is a task designed to get them thinking creatively about space.

Lesson Plan Six:

Date/Times: Day Six, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Introduction to broadcast project

Goals/Objectives:

1. Students will incorporate their background knowledge of the planets of the solar system to form creative writing pieces

a. Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

2. Students will compare and contrast poetry with informational text and their background knowledge

a. Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

3. Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

a. Students will use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

b. Students will share information on a particular planet in an appropriate, informative, and interesting format

c. Students will transform research and prior knowledge into an original literary text

Materials:

Landau, E. (March 2008). Earth (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Mars (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Mercury (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Jupiter (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Neptune (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Pluto: From planet to dwarf (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Saturn (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Uranus (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Venus (True books).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Brightest in the sky: The plant Venus (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Dwarf planets: Pluto, Charon, Ceres, and Eris (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Farthest from the sun: The plant Neptune (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). The largest planet: Jupiter (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Nearest to the sun: The plant Mercury (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Our home planet: Earth (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Ringed giant: The planet Saturn (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Seeing Red: The plant Mars (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). The sideways planet: Uranus (Amazing science: Planets).

Access to a computer lab or laptops for each student in the class

Introduction to the Lesson:

Watch a silly, entertaining video clip from a news broadcast. Have students discuss what made the broadcast interesting, yet informative to viewers. Introduce their broadcast assignment on the planets of the solar system that they will be working on for the next several days.

Language Arts Activities:

Explain to students that each group will be responsible for creating a broadcast as if they were reporting from a particular planet.

Students will be asked to incorporate all of the information they have learned in class about that particular planet, as well as at least five facts they researched independently. They are to record this information in an organized manner, and with little assistance.

Students will transform this information into a broadcast script that is both informative and engaging.

Point out all of the available materials in the classroom, such as Landau's True Books about each planet, Loewen's books about each planet, and remind students that they may also use the laptop computers to gain new information.

Remind students this session is mainly focused on gathering their information and organizing it in a logical sequence.

Review and Summary:

Meet briefly with each group to discuss their progress and concerns. Clear up any questions or misconceptions each group have.

Assessment:

Take anecdotal notes on the progress of each group, and the contribution of each group member. Formal assessment of the project will include these factors so these notes will become important.

Lesson Plan Seven:

Date/Times: Day Seven, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Continuation of broadcast project

Goals/Objectives:

1. Students will incorporate their background knowledge of the planets of the solar system to form creative writing pieces

a. Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

2. Students will compare and contrast poetry with informational text and their background knowledge

a. Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

3. Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

a. Students will use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

b. Students will share information on a particular planet in an appropriate, informative, and interesting format

c. Students will transform research and prior knowledge into an original literary text

Materials:

Landau, E. (March 2008). Earth (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Mars (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Mercury (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Jupiter (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Neptune (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Pluto: From planet to dwarf (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Saturn (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Uranus (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Venus (True books).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Brightest in the sky: The plant Venus (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Dwarf planets: Pluto, Charon, Ceres, and Eris (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Farthest from the sun: The plant Neptune (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). The largest planet: Jupiter (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Nearest to the sun: The plant Mercury (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Our home planet: Earth (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Ringed giant: The planet Saturn (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Seeing Red: The plant Mars (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). The sideways planet: Uranus (Amazing science: Planets).

Access to a computer lab or laptops for each student in the class

Introduction to the Lesson:

Spend a few minutes allowing the groups to share what they accomplished yesterday and what they think of their project thus far. Have groups share any tips they may have about creating the script with each other. Model a format of writing scripts students may use if they so chose.

Language Arts Activities:

Remind students will be asked to incorporate all of the information they have learned in class about that particular planet, as well as at least five facts they researched independently. They are to record this information in an organized manner, and with little assistance.

Point out all of the available materials in the classroom, such as Landau's True Books about each planet, Loewen's books about each planet, and remind students that they may also use the laptop computers to gain new information.

Remind students this session is mainly focused on transforming their gathered information into a broadcast script that is both informative and engaging.

Constantly monitor students' progress with their scripts and assist when necessary.

Review and Summary:

Meet briefly with each group to discuss their progress and concerns. Clear up any questions or misconceptions each group have.

Assessment:

Take anecdotal notes on the progress of each group, and the contribution of each group member. Formal assessment of the project will include these factors so these notes will become important.

Lesson Plan Eight:

Date/Times: Day Eight, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Continuation of broadcast project

Goals/Objectives:

1. Students will incorporate their background knowledge of the planets of the solar system to form creative writing pieces

a. Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

2. Students will compare and contrast poetry with informational text and their background knowledge

a. Students will create a fictional poem, incorporating facts from their background knowledge on a particular planet

3. Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

a. Students will use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

b. Students will share information on a particular planet in an appropriate, informative, and interesting format

c. Students will transform research and prior knowledge into an original literary text

Materials:

Landau, E. (March 2008). Earth (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Mars (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Mercury (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Jupiter (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Neptune (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Pluto: From planet to dwarf (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Saturn (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Uranus (True books).

Landau, E. (March 2008). Venus (True books).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Brightest in the sky: The plant Venus (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Dwarf planets: Pluto, Charon, Ceres, and Eris (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Farthest from the sun: The plant Neptune (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). The largest planet: Jupiter (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Nearest to the sun: The plant Mercury (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Our home planet: Earth (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Ringed giant: The planet Saturn (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). Seeing Red: The plant Mars (Amazing science: Planets).

Loewen, N. & Yesh, J. (February 15, 2008). The sideways planet: Uranus (Amazing science: Planets).

Access to a computer lab or laptops for each student in the class

Rubric of assignment

Introduction to the Lesson:

Spend a few minutes allowing the groups to share what they accomplished yesterday and what they think of their project thus far. Have groups share any tips they may have about creating the script with each other. Act out two mock performances for students, one that uses little expression or motion, and another that is an excellent example. Have students discuss which was better and why. Explain what will be expected out of their performances tomorrow and how they will be graded on their rubric.

Language Arts Activities:

Remind students will be asked to incorporate all of the information they have learned in class about that particular planet, as well as at least five facts they researched independently. They are to record this information in an organized manner, and with little assistance.

Point out all of the available materials in the classroom, such as Landau's True Books about each planet, Loewen's books about each planet, and remind students that they may also use the laptop computers to gain new information.

Remind students this session is mainly focused on finalizing their scripts and practicing their lines for tomorrow's performance.

Constantly monitor students' progress with their scripts and performance practice and assist when necessary.

Review and Summary:

Meet briefly with each group to discuss their progress and concerns. Clear up any questions or misconceptions each group have. Ensure their script is what was expected, incorporates all of the necessary information, and will be interesting and appropriate to their audience. Be sure each group member feels prepared for his or her performance tomorrow.

Assessment:

Take anecdotal notes on the progress of each group, and the contribution of each group member. Formal assessment of the project will include these factors so these notes will become important.

Lesson Plan Nine:

Date/Times: Day Nine, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Presentation of Broadcast Project

Goals/Objectives:

Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

Students will provide appropriate feedback on others' presentations

Materials:

Video camera

Video production software

Student feedback forms

Rubric of assignment

Introduction to the Lesson:

Mentally prepare students for today's performances. Explain that they should not be too nervous, but do their best work. Explain to students where they should stand specifically in front of the camera, and to be sure to speak loudly and clearly.

Language Arts Activities:

Have groups take turns performing their broadcast while being videotaped.

Groups that are not performing at the time should be filling in a feedback form to provide students with comments on what they did very well and things they may chose to improve upon in the future.

Review and Summary:

Congratulate all students on a group well done and explain that they will be watching their performances tomorrow.

Assessment:

Formally assess each group's performance, including grades for each individual based on the gathered anecdotal notes. Not each member of the group will necessarily receive the same grade.

Lesson Plan Ten:

Date/Times: Day Ten, 45 minutes

Grade Level: Fifth Grade

Theme: Solar System (Planets)

Title for the Day's Lesson: Conclusion of the unit

Goals/Objectives:

Students will prepare and present information on the planets of the solar system

Students will provide appropriate feedback on others' presentations

Materials:

Video production software

Student feedback forms

Rubric of assignment

Jeopardy template for Microsoft PowerPoint

Introduction to the Lesson:

Excitedly remind students that they will have the opportunity to watch their broadcasts today. Students should be a respectful audience and listen carefully. (Could also pass out popcorn for students to eat while they watch themselves to make the day more fun for them!)

Language Arts Activities:

Have each student fill out a student feedback form on their own performance after watching it on video

Have students share some of their compliments and critiques of each other's performances in a respectful manner.

Review and Summary:

Play Jeopardy to review all information students gained as a result of this unit, including the distance from the Sun, the number of moons and rings each has, and basic information about each planet (color, size, etc.)

Assessment:

Students' ability to critique and praise each other and themselves will be done through observation. Formal assessment of the science content in this unit will be assessed separately in science lessons.

Writing Services

Essay Writing
Service

Find out how the very best essay writing service can help you accomplish more and achieve higher marks today.

Assignment Writing Service

From complicated assignments to tricky tasks, our experts can tackle virtually any question thrown at them.

Dissertation Writing Service

A dissertation (also known as a thesis or research project) is probably the most important piece of work for any student! From full dissertations to individual chapters, we’re on hand to support you.

Coursework Writing Service

Our expert qualified writers can help you get your coursework right first time, every time.

Dissertation Proposal Service

The first step to completing a dissertation is to create a proposal that talks about what you wish to do. Our experts can design suitable methodologies - perfect to help you get started with a dissertation.

Report Writing
Service

Reports for any audience. Perfectly structured, professionally written, and tailored to suit your exact requirements.

Essay Skeleton Answer Service

If you’re just looking for some help to get started on an essay, our outline service provides you with a perfect essay plan.

Marking & Proofreading Service

Not sure if your work is hitting the mark? Struggling to get feedback from your lecturer? Our premium marking service was created just for you - get the feedback you deserve now.

Exam Revision
Service

Exams can be one of the most stressful experiences you’ll ever have! Revision is key, and we’re here to help. With custom created revision notes and exam answers, you’ll never feel underprepared again.