The Genres Of Play Education Essay

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The convention recognises childrens right to play and be active participants in all matters affecting their lives (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Play-based learning is a framework for learning through which children organise and make sense of their social worlds, as they engage actively with people, objects and depictions (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

The Framework forms the foundation for ensuring that children in all early childhood education and care settings experience quality teaching and learning. It has a specific emphasis on play-based learning and recognises the importance of communication and language (including early literacy and numeric) and social and emotional development (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Play is a context for learning that:

Allows for the expression of personality and uniqueness

Enhances dispositions such as curiosity and creativity

Enables children to make connections between prior experiences and new learning

Assists children to develop relationships and concepts

Stimulates a sense of well-being

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Elements of the Early Years Learning Framework show that Practice is a holistic approach is responsive to children learning through play intentionally teaching (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Partnerships also involve educators, families and support professionals working together to explore the learning potential in every day events, routines and play so that children with additional needs are provided with daily opportunities to learn from active participation and engagement in these experiences in the home and in early childhood or specialist settings (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

The principles of early childhood pedagogy underpin practice. Educators draw on a rich repertoire of pedagogical practices to promote children's learning by planning and implementing learning through play (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Educators are also responsive to children's ideas and play, which form an important basis for curriculum decision-making (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Responsiveness enables educators to respectfully enter children's play and ongoing projects, stimulate their thinking and enrich their learning (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Learning through play provides prospects for children to learn as they discover, create, improvise and imagine. When children play with other children they create social groups, test out ideas, challenge each other's thinking and build new understandings. Play offers a supportive environment where children can enhance their thinking by asking questions, solve problems and engage in critical thinking. In these ways play can endorse positive characters towards learning. Children's interests in their play illustrate how play enables them to simply enjoy 'being'. Early childhood educators take on many roles in play with children and use a range of strategies to support learning. They connect in continual shared conversations with children to extend their thinking. They provide a balance between child led, child initiated and educator supported learning. They create learning environments that encourage children to explore, solve problems, create and construct. Educators interact with babies and children to build attachment. They use routines and play experiences to do this. They also recognise impulsive teachable moments as they transpire, and use them to build on children's learning. Early childhood educators work with young children to encourage and replica positive ways to relate to others. They energetically support the enclosure of all children in play, help children to recognise when play is unfair and offer productive ways to build a caring, fair and comprehensive learning community (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children's play in natural environments includes plants, trees, edible gardens, sand, rocks, mud, water and other elements from nature. These types of play in the open environments invite open-ended interactions, impulsiveness, risk-taking, examination, discovery and connection with nature. They promote an positive reception of the natural environment, develop environmental awareness and provide a podium for ongoing environmental education (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

In early childhood settings children develop a sense of 'belonging' when they feel accepted, develop attachments and trust those that care for them. As children are developing their sense of identity, they explore different aspects of it (physical, social, emotional, spiritual, cognitive), through their play and their relationships (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children feel safe, secure and supported when they:

Confidently explore and engage with

Social and physical environments through

Relationships and play

Initiate and join in play

Explore aspects of identity through role play

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children have a strong sense of identity when they have an emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency. Educators promote this learning, when they:

Provide opportunities for children to engage independently with tasks and play

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children have a strong sense of identity. They develop knowledgeable and confident self-identities when they:

Feel recognised and respected for who they are

Explore different identities and points of view in dramatic play

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children have a strong sense of identity when they learn how to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect. This is evident when they engage in and contribute to share play experiences (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Educators promote this type of learning when they:

Organise learning environments in ways that promote small group interactions and play experiences

Model explicit communication strategies to support children to initiate interactions and join in play and social experiences in ways that sustain productive relationships with other children

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation when they:

Cooperate with others and negotiate roles and relationships in play episodes and group experiences

Understand different ways of contributing

Through play and projects

Are playful and respond positively to others,

Reaching out for company and friendship

Educators promote this learning when they guarantee that children have the skills to participate and contribute to group play and projects

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment when children use play to investigate, project and explore new ideas (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children have a strong sense of well-being. Good nutrition is essential to healthy living and enables children to be active participants in play (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children become strong in their social and emotional well-being when they challenge and support other children to engage in and persevere at tasks and play (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children take increasing responsibility for their own health and physical well-being they:

Show enthusiasm for participating in physical

Play and negotiate play spaces to ensure the

Safety and well-being of themselves and others

Draw on family and community experiences

And expertise to include familiar games and

Physical activities in play

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity; cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity. This initiates and contributes to play experiences emerging from their own ideas (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, inquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating when educators join in children's play and model reasoning, predicting and reflecting processes and language (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children transfer and adapt what they have learned from one context to another and use the processes of play, reflection and investigation to solve problems (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials by exploring ideas and theories using imagination, creativity and play (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009). Educators think carefully about how children are grouped for play, considering possibilities for peer scaffolding (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes when they:

Use language and representations from play,

Music and art to share and project meaning

Contribute their ideas and experiences in

Play, small and large group discussions

Exchange ideas, feelings and understandings

Using language and representations in play

Educators engage in enjoyable interactions with

Babies as they make and play with sounds

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts they:

Take on roles of literacy and numeric use in their play

Educators engage children in play with words and sounds

Join in children's play and engage children in conversations about the meanings of images and print

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media when they:

Use language and engage in play to imagine and create roles, scripts and ideas

Educators join in children's play and co-construct materials such as signs that extend the play and enhance literacy learning

(Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children begin to understand how symbols and pattern systems work when they use symbols in play to represent and make meaning (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking identifying the uses of technologies in everyday life and use real or imaginary technologies as props in their play educators integrate technologies into children's play experiences and projects (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

In an active learning environment, educators play a crucial role of encouraging children to discover deeper meanings and make connections among ideas and between concepts, processes and representations. This requires educators to be engaged with children's emotions and thinking. (Adapted from South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability (SACSA) Framework, General Introduction, pp10 & 11). (Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, 2009).

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