Teachers perceptions on alternative assessments education essay

Published:

Abstract

The intention of educational researchers on alternative assessments in various professional education publications were to persuade general educators toward collaborative teaching by providing analytical research to support general education for special needs students. The article, "Teacher perceptions and the consequential validity of an alternate assessment for students with significant cognitive disabilities" from the Journal of Disability Policy Studies examines the variables of teacher perceptions that may effect the validity of alternate assessment in regards to students with significant cognitive disabilities, may support collaborative teaching teams (Roach, A.R., Elliott, S.N., Berndt, S., 2007). In the article, "What do alternate assessments of alternate academic achievement standards measure? A multitrait-multimethod analysis", Kettler and the research team stated that there were not a significant amount of published studies or documentaries in US states' technical manuals providing evidence, thus, may not support collaborative teaching teams (Kettler, R.J., et. al., 2010).

Introduction

Lady using a tablet
Lady using a tablet

Professional

Essay Writers

Lady Using Tablet

Get your grade
or your money back

using our Essay Writing Service!

Essay Writing Service

The intention of educational researchers on alternative assessments in various professional education publications were to persuade general educators toward collaborative teaching by providing analytical research to support general education for special needs students. The following two articles under consideration examined authentication and counter augments of the implications of alternative assessments. The first article, "Teacher perceptions and the consequential validity of an alternate assessment for students with significant cognitive disabilities from Journal of Disability Policy Studies", discusses how the performance and portfolio assessments provide rich descriptions of students' real-life knowledge and skills (Roach, A.R., Elliott, S.N., Berndt, S., 2007)" to which may provide support for collaborative teaching teams. The second article, "What do alternate assessments of alternate academic achievement standards measure? A multitrait-multimethod analysis from the education journal, Exceptional Children, counterargument on alternative assessments expressed "concerns about the technical soundness of alternative assessment, academic achievement standards (AA-AASs). The basic questions about the constructs measured and their relationship to other measures of achievement remain largely unsubstantiated by rigorous research and validation studies (Kettler, R.J., et. al., 2010)", thus, seemly do not support collaborative teaching teams.

Teachers' Perceptions on Alternative Assessments

The article, "Teacher perceptions and the consequential validity of an alternate assessment for students with significant cognitive disabilities" from the Journal of Disability Policy Studies examines the variables of teacher perceptions that may effect the validity of alternate assessment in regards to students with significant cognitive disabilities. According to Roach, Elliott, and Berndt, "there is limited data available on teachers' experiences with, and perceptions of, alternate assessment for students with disabilities because it is a relatively new education practice (2007)." Although performance and portfolio assessments are appealing because of their potential to provide rich descriptions of students' real-life knowledge and skills, concerns were expressed about the performance-based approaches.

Other than the variable of teachers' perceptions about alternative assessment, it was suggested that the technical characteristics of these alternate assessments might negatively influence students' and schools' outcome scores. For example, factors such as instability of student behavior or health status may have potential influences on students' alternate assessment results. In the case of on-demand performance tasks, fluctuations in student behavior or physical well-being could potentially result in inaccurate and invalid assessment results (Roach, A.R., Elliott, S.N., Berndt, S., 2007)." The results from the study indicated that some respondents felt the alternate assessment focused on assessing the teachers' creativity and his or her instructional practices rather than documenting actual student performance (Kleinert et al., 1999). Other results were teachers questioned whether the skills and concepts covered on the alternate assessment were appropriate for students with the most significant disabilities (Roach, A.R., Elliott, S.N., Berndt, S., 2007)." Another result is that "a majority of teachers (53%) reported that their school district had no plan in place to support access to the general curriculum by students with significant disabilities. Moreover, respondents identified grooming, social skills, communication, choice-making, and problem solving as more important education objectives than ensuring students' access to and progress in the general education curriculum (Roach, A.R., Elliott, S.N., Berndt, S., 2007)." Lastly, "in the same investigation, teachers also reported that students' challenging behaviors and resistance from general educators and administrators were significant barriers to access (Roach, A.R., Elliott, S.N., Berndt, S., 2007)." Although the desired outcome of the alternate assessment process is increased access to general education curricula and inclusive instructional environments for students with significant disabilities (Roach, A.R., Elliott, S.N., Berndt, S., 2007), the study suggests that some special educators may be open to integrating the alternative assessment practices into their teaching practices in ways that will facilitate students' progress in the core academic areas of reading, language arts, and mathematics. However, to ensure that students with significant disabilities are not "left behind," additional investigations such as interviews, record reviews, and participant observation, are needed to determine the implementation of the AA promotes more standards-focused Individual Educational Plans and increased inclusion of students with significant disabilities in general education settings (Roach, A.R., Elliott, S.N., Berndt, S., 2007)."

Alternative Assessment Standards

Lady using a tablet
Lady using a tablet

Comprehensive

Writing Services

Lady Using Tablet

Plagiarism-free
Always on Time

Marked to Standard

Order Now

Educators have been administering alternate assessments to students with significant disabilities who cannot participate in their states' general achievement tests for over ten years but R.J. Kettler and his team of researchers were concern about the technical soundness of the AA-AASs (Kettler, R.J., et. al., 2010). In the article, "What do alternate assessments of alternate academic achievement standards measure? A multitrait-multimethod analysis", Kettler and the research team stated that there was not a significant amount of published studies or documentaries in US states' technical manuals providing evidence. The U.S. Department of Education' set the standard of alternative assessments as they must be aligned with the state's content standards. It must also yield results separately in both reading/language arts and mathematics, and must be designed and implemented in a manner that supports use of the results as an indicator of AYR" (adequate yearly progress; U.S. Department of Education, 2005, p. 15) (Kettler, R.J., et. al., 2010)." Unfortunately, only 41% of the states and one territory reported conducting a formal study to document that test and item scores are related to internal or external variables as intended and 59% of the states had did a formal study and documented measurement of the construct relevance of their test. Although these states did document their findings, the information was not widely available (Kettler, R.J., et. al., 2010). The article concluded that future research to investigate the relationship between AA-AASs (regardless of approach: portfolios, performance assessments, and checklists) and another accepted measure of student learning should be conducted. Kettler and the research team concluded that there was no evidence to support the correlation of alternate assessments with other accepted measures of student learning (Kettler, R.J., et. al., 2010). They cautioned educators of interpreting the scores of these assessments (Kettler, R.J., et. al., 2010)."

Conclusion

It is mandatory for special students to take these assessments in order to fulfill the state's mandate but in spite of it, I would continue to educated students for everyday living, as this is necessary for their survival. According the authors, many teachers, in spite of the legislative efforts to focus on accountability for student learning in the core academic subjects, opt to maintain a difficult balance between academic skills and nonacademic skills in their classroom instruction. They believe the effort to provide the nonacademic skills are essential for these students to live successful lives outside school (Kettler, R.J., et. al., 2010)."