Strategies to Improve Adult Learning

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As a requirement, the pre-departure workshops and orientation offered by the International Education Center are designed to prepare students who have been accepted into study abroad programs. Assessment of a non-graded course is difficult however for a student to be success while abroad training is required. It is important therefore to design and implement non-graded assessment that produces critical thinking and judgment, while evaluating the needed skills. The following plan outlines multiple forms of assessment that will evaluate skills necessary for the student to survive while abroad while producing critical thinking and judgment skills.

Introduction

Each year, hundreds of University of California, Riverside's students study abroad. However, many students do not achieve the potential benefits of their intercultural experience because they are not equipped for the demands of living and learning in a foreign country. They inevitably experience some level of culture shock, whether it be communicating, adapting to educational systems, dealing with health and safety issues, or navigating entry clearance process prior to departure. It has become increasingly necessary for students to find a way to adapt to their new culture, but starting their preparation prior to departure. Pre-departure workshops and/or orientations allows student to receive the much need information and guidance to adapting to a new culture.

Student who have been admitted to foreign universities are required to participate in pre-departure workshops and orientations. International Education Center (IEC) has held various forms of workshops and orientation, at least twice a year, to assure students have necessary information and skills to benefit from their travel and study experience. The goal is to give students enough resources on finances, health and safety, culture and world affairs in order for them to make the appropriate cultural adjustments. In addition, training is designed to help student think for them selves or critically think about the issues that they will be faced with while abroad.

As budget cuts and loss of staff has affected the format of pre-departure workshops and orientations, the IEC need to meet the needs of the student with less resources. The implementation of a formalized assessment plan will ensure that the students are receiving the necessary when training has been condensed. Since students receive no formal grades assessment will be designed so that students do not feel as though they are in an average classroom. The following assessment planing will meet those requirements.

Section 1: Organizational Overview and Context

Overview

The IEC handles immigration issues for incoming international students, operates the Education Abroad Program (EAP), which is the University of California's study abroad program, and the Opportunities Abroad Program (OAP). The IEC provides pre-departure advising and workshops to prepare EAP and OAP students for their study abroad programs. In the past, we have had enough staff to focus on one-on-one advising, which lessen the need for workshops. With budget cuts and reduction of staff, we instituted a three part mandatory workshop series, optional workshops, and open advising. The pre-departure preparation is vital to their success while abroad.

There are 8 goals of the pre-departure advising and workshops:

To help students to with program logistical information and form processing.

To help students develop realistic expectations.

To give students access to health & safety services.

To prepare students for abroad courses that will ensure academic success.

To help students to receive access to financial resources and knowledge in budget planning.

To help students to focus on their own and host country identity (values and behaviors).

To prepare students for cross-cultural issues.

To help ease pre-departure anxiety.

Pre-departure advising and workshops will be conducted and developed by the study abroad advisors, student interns, and Global Opportunities Abroad Leaders. The evaluation will be conducted by the Director of the IEC.

Context

For students to be successful while abroad, they need guidance from entry clearance to cross-cultural issues. The three part mandatory workshop series provides student with all vital information necessary for a student prior to departure. Non-attendance may results in a student missing a deadline which ultimately will cause the student to be withdrawn from the program. Optional workshop gives students basic knowledge, i.e., in country budget tips, purchasing tickets, and travel safety tips. These workshops are conducted by student returnees, who offer knowledge from their own experience to give students up-to-date information. There are two study abroad advisors in the IEC who have open advising hours. EAP countries are divided between them and one advisor handles all OAP countries. There is at least one open advising hour every day to allow participants to walking to have minor questions to be answered. Upon departure student will have all the necessary information, resources, and tools to allow them to adapt to new academic and cultural situations.

Section 2: Organizational, Training, and Learning Objectives

The IEC's mission statement is as follows:

"To help internationalize the educational experience offered at UC Riverside. Within the broad context of a land-grant university, our center is committed to the enhancement of international/cross-cultural education and research and to extension of its expertise and networks to the region at large" (IEC, 2010).

Through the mission statement the goal is not only to educate but prepare students for their experience abroad. According to Module 2 Theme 1, "goals are often broken down into more specific expected outcomes, which are often called objectives" (JIU, 2010). So the organizational objectives are outcomes for the organization to achieve their mission. Therefore the training objectives will tell what they hope to achieve through training which will lead them to developing what the students will learn through the learning objectives.

Organizational Objectives

The IEC serves as a liaison to handle study abroad participant's issues with academics, finance, health, and safety.

The IEC trains and offers guidance for study abroad participants to complete necessary paperwork which will allow them to participate on a program.

The IEC provides resources for study abroad participants to obtain the skills necessary for them to problem solve prior to departure and while abroad.

Training Objectives

The study abroad advisors will conduct workshops that will inform study abroad participant about policies and procedures for their program, cultural awareness, and safety issues.

The study abroad advisors will show study abroad participants where to find resources related to academics, finance, health and safety issues and provide contact information.

The study abroad advisors will train study abroad student to completing applications and entry clearance documentation.

Learning Objectives

When apply for visa, study abroad participants will know how to complete all logistical documentation to obtain entry clearance documentation upon their first attempt.

Study abroad participants will propose a course plan to be approved by academic advisor prior to departure.

Study abroad participants will design a travel budget and program budget worksheet to ensure financial need is met while abroad.

Study abroad participants will recall contact information and resources for health, safety, and emergency when necessary.

Study abroad participants will examine economical, political, and social issues that relate to program anxiety to successfully adapt to host country culture.

Study abroad participants will define perceptions of their host country and as necessary dispel misconceptions and unrealistic expectations prior to departure.

Section 3: Formative and Summative Assessment Elements

Formative Assessment

Formative assessment is designed to produce a dialogue that is "thoughtful, reflective, focused to evoke and explore understanding" (Black & Wiliam, 1998). At the beginning of the training, the students will complete a reflection sheet on personal, academic, graduate and career goals. Upon completion of the pre-departure orientation the student will again assess their personal, academic, graduate and career goals. During the training, students will discuss in groups various cultural, social, and political issue affecting their host countries. Group discussion will allow them to reflect on their expectation and fears, as they relate to the fore mentioned issues. Student will participate in a cross-cultural role play to become competent in communicating and interacting in another culture.

Summative Assessment

As there is no formal summative assessment associated with pre-departure training, students will be assessed on a weekend trip presentation during the pre-departure orientation. Students will be evaluated on the following:

Travel budget planning with accurate currency conversion and creating trip with in given budget.

Navigational skills between point A to point B.

Negotiation with a given group dynamic.

Crisis resolution and prevention.

Evaluation of priorities for trip between academics and travel.

Section 4: Evaluation Plan Blueprint

According to Phillips and Stone (2002), an evaluation blueprint outlines the following:

Designated roles and responsibility;

Defines target audience

Establishes a timeline;

Establishes goals and objectives;

Establishes form of assessment;

Defines implementation of plan;

Reporting procedure.

The evaluation blueprint for the pre-departure training will allow the IEC to have a set cohesive plan that will allow for a set training plan.

Goals

The goal of the pre-departure training is to prepare outbound study abroad students with all the vital information to complete entry clearance paperwork and to obtain the survival skills for living abroad. Training will ensure that student know where to find information related to their program, financial aid, and insurance. Training will also be designed to teach students how to properly complete visa documentation and health clearance. In addition, training will provide students with resources to handle academic, cross-cultural, health and safety issues while abroad. Audience and Situation

Training will be given to all outbound students who are participating on EAP or OAP programs. Pre-departure training will consist of four mandatory workshops and orientation, as follows: Finance Meeting, Selection Maintenance Seminar, Academic Plus Seminar, Visa Workshop, and Health, Safety and Wellness Orientation. Students may also attend optional workshops for Budget and Trip Planning. Participate will obtain the knowledge to have a successful study abroad experience.

Learning Objectives

Study abroad participants will be able to do the following:

Complete all logistical documentation to obtain entry clearance documentation upon their first attempt when apply for visa.

Propose a course plan to be approved by academic advisor prior to departure.

Design a travel budget and program budget worksheet to ensure financial need is met while abroad.

Recall contact information and resources for health, safety, and emergency when necessary.

Examine economical, political, and social issues that relate to program anxiety to successfully adapt to host country culture.

Define perceptions of their host country and as necessary dispel misconceptions and unrealistic expectations prior to departure.

Formative

Type: Self Assessment - Short Answer

Student will complete self assessment and goal-setting worksheet prior to their departure. The purpose of self-assessment and goal-setting is for students to reflect on prior training that is relevant for academic, personal, grad school, and career goals which relates to their experience abroad. This is meant allow student to start a meaningful conversation within their peer groups.

Relative Emphasis: 25%

Criteria: Student will complete four section worksheet identifying primary goals. Then in a group discussion identify the top goals for the group.

Type: Group Discussion - Short Answer

Student will complete fears and expectations worksheet prior to their departure. The purpose of exercise is for student to identify fears and expectations and provide rational solutions. This is meant allow student to be aware of the same fears and expectations within their peer groups.

Relative Emphasis: 25%

Criteria: Student will complete two section worksheet identifying fears and expectations. Then in a group discussion students will discuss resolution for fears and concerns related to expectations.

Type: Informal Observation - Role Play

Trainers will observe students in a cross-cultural role play in which student will be divided into two cultures in which student will have a new language and cultural rules and guidelines in which they must adhere to. The purpose of exercise is for students to become competent in communicating and interacting in another culture.

Relative Emphasis: 50%

Criteria: Student will learn a new language and adapt to new customs within 30 minutes. Afterwards student will in small groups cross over into the new culture to attempt to adapt to the other culture.

Summative

Type: Capstone Project - Presentation

Students will be divided into groups to give a presentation on a weekend trip. The purpose of exercise is for students to design a trip with a given budget and participant list, while presenting students must solve crisis presented to them by the trainers.

Relative Emphasis: 100% (20% budgeting, 20% problem resolution, 20% crisis prevention, 10% group negotiations, 10% resources, 10% packing list, and 10% navigation)

Criteria: Student will present a realistic weekend trip, convert and use currency correctly for given host country and country of trip. Students will identify resources used and present a navigational plan. Students will present top 5 items to be packed and relay how the group negotiated the list and trip location. Students will spontaneously respond to crisis situation and give solutions and preventive measures.

Reporting

Study abroad participants will receive no formal grades but verbal feedback from the trainers upon completion of each assessment. In addition, students may receive verbal feedback in one-on-one advising sessions. Students will complete and evaluation at the end of each workshop and prior to the return from their program. A full report based on the evaluations will be submitted to the Director of the IEC, and/or the Faculty Director and UOEAP as necessary.

Section 5: Assessment Instruments

Although students will not receive a formal grade for assessment items, the goal is for them to critically think about experiences and opportunities that they will encounter while abroad. In addition, students will obtain a realization that they will encounter challenges and gain new perceptions and knowledge about the host culture.

Through formative assessment students will have two short answer worksheets to complete in conjunction with group discussions to allow them to critical reflect on their goals, expectations and fears. The goal is for the students to remain open-minded about their and their peers' feedback. In addition, to challenge them to create an inner dialogue that will challenge them to constantly to be questioning what they what to achieve, what they think they know, their opinions, and prejudices. Students will also engage in a cross-cultural role play that will challenge their perceptions about culture. As study abroad can be referred as experiential learning, the role play puts them in a safe environment for them to simulate being in a new culture. Students will also gain skills that will allow them not only adapt to a new culture but to learn a new language.

Name your primary goals for your study abroad experience.Goals Assessment

Afterwards, discuss your goals in your group.

Note: Any obstacles and solutions in meeting your goals.

Goal Setting Rubric

Criteria

Proficient

Developing

Not Yet Developed

Specific/Measurable

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal are specific and measurable (have concrete criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of goal). They are clear, simple, complete and explicit. They answer the questions: "what is the actual behavior that will occur?", "how it will be accomplished?", and "why is this goal important?"

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal are general, incomplete and vague (do not have clear criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of goal.). Does not address the following questions: "what is the actual behavior that will occur?", "how it will be accomplished?", and "why is this goal important?"

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal are not specific or measurable.

Achievable/Realistic

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal are achievable and realistic. Goal has an outcome that is realistic given the current situation, resources and time available.

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal may or may not be achievable and realistic. Goal has an outcome that is likely not realistic given the current situation, resources and time available.

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal are not achievable or realistic.

Relevant/Personal

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal are relevant and personal. The goal represents an objective toward which there is both willingness and ability.

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal are partly relevant and personal. The goal does not represent an objective toward which there is both willingness and ability.

Goal statement and/or strategies to support goal are irrelevant & impersonal.

Obstacles

Obstacles to completion of goal are identified and clear.

Obstacles to completion of goal are incomplete and unclear.

Obstacles to completion of goal are not identified or clear.

Solutions

Solutions to obstacles are specific, measurable, and realistic.

Solutions to obstacles are only loosely defined or unspecific, immeasurable, and/or unrealistic.

Solutions are not specific, measurable, and realistic.

Resources/Support

Resources and support to help reach goal were clearly identified and are relevant to accomplishing the goal.

Resources and support to help reach goal were vaguely identified or lack relevance for accomplishing the goal.

Resources and support to help reach goal not identified.

What are your...Fears and Expectations Assessment

Afterwards, discuss your expectation and fears in your group.

Note: Any obstacles and solutions in meeting your goals.

EXPECTATIONS

FEARS

Fears and Expectations Rubric

Criteria

Proficient

Developing

Not Yet Developed

Specific

Fears/Expectations statements are specific. They are clear, simple, complete and explicit. They answer the questions: "what are your fears?", "what are your expectations?", and "how will they affect your experience abroad?"

Fears/Expectations statements are general, incomplete and vague. Does not address the following questions: "what are your fears?", "what are your expectations?", and "how will they affect your experience abroad?"

Fears/Expectations statements are not specific.

Realistic

Fears/Expectations statements are realistic. Fears/Expectations are founded as a direct outcome that is realistic given the current situation, resources and time available.

Fears/Expectations statements may be or may not be realistic. Fears/Expectations are founded as a direct outcome that is s likely not realistic given the current situation, resources and time available.

Fears/Expectations are not realistic.

Relevant/Personal

Fears/Expectations are relevant and personal. Expresses fears/expectations openly and honestly.

Fears/Expectations are partly relevant and personal. Expresses fears/expectations partly openly and honestly.

Fears/Expectations are irrelevant & impersonal.

BaFa BaFa Role Play

Goals

• Create a situation that allows the group to explore and experience the impact that culture has on how people perceive and treat others.

• Create feeling similar to those one would likely have when encountering people from another culture.

• Give participants experience in observing and interacting with a different culture.

• Provide a framework for discussing how people who bring differences can work together effectively.

Outline of Events

1. Participants divide into two cultures: Alpha and Beta.

2. Participants learn and practice their new culture.

3. Each culture selects and instructs an observer.

4. Cultures exchange observers.

5. Observers report back to home culture.

6. Cultures exchange visitors.

7. Visitors report back to their home culture.

8. Simulation ends and we'll discuss the experience.

Processing BaFa BaFa: Large Group Discussion

• Alphans are (appeared to be):

• Betans are (appeared to be):

• How Alphans felt when visiting the Betan culture:

• How Betans felt when visiting the Alphan culture:

• Alphan culture revealed:

• Betan culture revealed:

Small Group Discussion

1. What was your initial reaction to this simulation?

2. How did you cope when visiting the other culture? What worked? What didn't work?

3. How did you respond to visitors when they visited your culture?

4. Look at the words on the chart that describe the way Alphans and Betans felt when they visited the other culture.

• Have you ever felt that way at work or in interactions with members?

• How did it affect your morale and productivity?

Bafa Bafa Questions for Individual Reflection

1. What insights, thoughts, feelings or learning occur to you as you think about the BaFa BaFa experience?

2. Each person is different in some way from the people with whom he or she works. Identify one of the ways in which you are different. How has it helped you? How has it hurt you?

3. What are some of the disadvantages, frustrations or problems that you have experienced when working with people who are different?

4. What are some of the ways you have benefited from working with people who are different?

5. What are some of the things an individual employee can do to increase or improve upon the benefits that can come to him or her as a result of working with someone who is different? (These benefits were identified in question 4 above).

Role Play Rubric

Criteria

Proficient

Developing

Not Yet Developed

Credible

Highly credible in role. Nice mix of acting and accuracy. Followed the guidelines of the role play.

Somewhat credible in role with some vagueness or minor inaccuracies. Somewhat followed guidelines of the role play.

Not credible with no attempt of accuracies. Did not follow the guidelines of the role play.

Cultural Awareness

Articulates insight into own and to the other cultural rules and biases (e.g. seeking complexity; aware of how her/his experience have shaped these rules, and how to recognize and respond to cultural biases, resulting in self-description.

Vaguely recognizes perspectives about own and to the other cultural rules and biases (e.g. seeking complexity; aware of how her/his experience have shaped these rules, and how to recognize and respond to cultural biases, resulting in self-description.

Shows no awareness about own and to the other cultural rules and biases.

Language proficiency

Understands the value of being multilingual, is at or working towards this proficiency, and is intrinsically motivated to learn not only a new language, but also about the culture from which the language is derived.

Willing to learn another language, but does not appreciate the value of this skill. Although student makes a genuine attempt to learn a new language, these efforts are motivated by rules of the role play.

Not interested in learning other languages. Efforts made towards these skills are superficial and motivated almost entirely by rules of the role play.

Interactions with individuals from different cultures

Almost always communicates, interacts, and works positively with individuals from other cultural groups; he/she seeks opportunities to learn from diverse perspectives.

Under supervision, can generally communicate, interact, and work positively with individuals from other cultural groups.

Communicates, interacts, or works poorly with individuals from other cultural groups.

Through summative assessment students will have a capstone project that will assess the culmination of skills that students will need while abroad. The goal is for the students to use skills that will allow them to navigate in another culture. In addition, students will also be faced with crises that will challenge them to problem solve issues related to academic, health, and safety issues.

Trip and Budget Planning Presentation

Group Members:

Guidelines:

As a group plan a 3 day weekend trip.

The trip must be a realistic trip.

Your group's budget is $10,000 American (remember to convert currency). You may use www.budgetyourtrip.com to help with your budget plan.

Research destinations, travel routes, costs, and cultural activities by reading travel brochures, books, and Internet sites.

Be prepared to make a 3 to 5-minute presentation. All members must participate in the presentation.

Turn in assignment with all group members name.

Assignment must include the following:

Itinerary

Budget (food, lodging, travel, activity costs)

Packing list

Itinerary

Airplane, Bus, and Train connections

Hotel information

Cultural information

Any other information that will enhance the trip

Resources for information (i.e. websites, books, etc)

Presentation Format

Information must be presented in this order.

Budget: Number of people in group

Amount per person = Total Budget number (Actual amount used)

Total US Budget Amount = Total converted amount for all currencies used (Actual converted amount used)

Resource Information

Packing: 5 essential things your group must pack for the trip

Itinerary (linking points, include price per person or group)

Day:

Mode of transportation

Accommodation information

Daily Activities

Presentation Format Example

Budget: One person

$4000 = $4000 ($3652 US)

$4000 US = $185, 640 Afghani and $3341.60 Euro ($3615 US, $1260 Afghani, $6 Euro)

Resources:

Expedia.com - flight

Google Search - hotel (chose first on the list as it in the center of the city)

Virtualtourist.com - activities (chose activities from people's descriptions)

Packing: Curling wand, makeup bag, walking shoes, camera, ipod

Itinerary:

Weekend trip to Kabul, Afghanistan

Thursday:

Transportation: Train Siena to Florence ($6 Euro)

Flight from Florence, Italy to Kabul, Afghanistan (2 connections Munich, Delhi) on Lufthansa and Air India ($3046 US)

Friday:

Taxi to Hotel ($100 Afghani)

Accommodation: Kabul Serna Hotel (2 nights for $562 US)

Activities: Taxi to Kabul Zoo ($50 Afghani)

Bus to Qargha Lake ($150 Afghani)

Saturday:

Bus - Kabul to Bamyan ($400 Afghani)

Activity: Ancient Budhas in Bamyan

Bus - Bamyan to Kabul ($400 Afghani)

Taxi to Khyber Restaurant ($40 Afghani)

Taxi to Hotel ($20 Afghani)

Sunday:

Taxi to Hotel ($100 Afghani)

Transportation: Flight from Kabul, Afghanistan to Florence, Italy (2 connections Delhi, Munich)

Train Florence to Siena

Trip and Budget Planning Rubric

Criteria

Proficient

Developing

Not Yet Developed

Budgeting

Made a realistic estimate of total cost of trip (transportation, food, lodging, extras) and correctly converted monies.

Made a non-realistic estimate - either way too high or way too low. lodging, extras) and correctly converted monies.

Made an attempt to estimate of total cost of trip but did not include all criteria.

Problem Resolution

Proposes one or more solutions that indicates a deep comprehension of the

Problem. Solution are sensitive to contextual factors as well as all of the

following: ethical, logical, and cultural dimensions of the problem.

.

Proposes one solution that is "off the shelf " rather than individually designed to address the specific contextual factors of the problem.

Proposes a solution that is

difficult to evaluate because it is vague or only indirectly addresses the problem statement.

Crisis Prevention

Sophisticated identification and handling of immediate and potential crisis, risk, and emergency issues. Knowledge of resources and who to consult for crisis matters.

Identifies high risk and emergency situations; minor problems in knowledge of resources and who to consult for crisis matters.

Misses and/or does not properly manage high risk or emergency situation; does not know resources and who to consult for crisis matters.

Group Negotiation

Presented an excellent group negotiated task, completing all set tasks in an appropriate manner and time frame with little to no assistance.

Presented a group negotiated task, made some effort to complete the negotiated task at a basic level.

Failed to present a group negotiated task.

Resources

Identifies a variety of types and formats of potential resources. Resources and support to help reach goal were clearly identified and are relevant to accomplishing the task.

Vaguely identifies a variety of types and formats of potential. Resources and support to help complete task were vaguely identified or lack relevance for accomplishing the goal.

Resources and support to complete task are not identified.

Packing List

Put a lot of thought and time into deciding what to pack. Provided reasoning for all items packed.

Put a lot of thought and time into deciding what to pack. Provided some or vague reasoning for items packed.

No though and time put in to deciding what to pack. Did not provide reasoning for why they packed the items

Navigation

Clearly defined trip plan. Navigation between locations is clear.

Trip plan is vague or poorly outlined. Navigation between locations is unclear.

Trip plan and navigation is not defined.

Section 6: Validity, Reliability, and Fairness

The purpose of assessment is for students to critically think about what they want from their experience abroad. Additionally, assessment will measure skills that will allow student to become accustomed to living in a new culture. The problem in judging each assessment is that the form of questioning is subjective, meaning that there may be more than one correct answer. Therefore when questioning validity, reliability, and fairness of subjective questioning, you must account for the multiple answers.

Validity is a process designed to measures what it is supposed to measure (Phillips and Stone, 2002). As there are multiple answers or responds to the given assessments outlined in the evaluation plan blueprint, the rubrics needs to serve as an outline of what is being evaluated. The rubric also gives students a clear idea of what is going to be evaluated even if the outcome is subjective. Producing a validity checklist will help ensure that content being assessed through the rubric is being measured accurately. Once assessment has been deemed valid then it must be administer and assessed in the same fashion.

"If an assessment produces dependable and consistent results between learners in the same class or training session and with other learners in different classes, the instructor and the student can have faith in the assessment and its results" (JIU, 2010). This is known as reliability. Multiple workshops are held with different trainers, so consistency in administering assessment to each group is essential. If one trainer presents the assessment tool differently will it produce the desire response? More than likely the answer will be no. Unfortunately, it is impossible to calculate reliability, so the checklist will serve as a guideline. Through the checklist the fore mentioned issue will also be addressed under fairness. "Ensuring fairness in the construction and administration of classroom assessment is a matter of paying attention to detail" (JIU, 2010).

Factor

Question

Yes

No

If no explain.

Validity

Does the assessment task help students to develop self-assessment skills?

Does the assessment represent the best conceptualization of the content?

Do the assessment tasks assess the knowledge or skill that it is intended to assess?

Are the assessment tasks relevant to issues student will face while abroad?

Reliability

Has the rubric been designed to capture the range of performance for all participants?

Was the administration of the assessment uniform?

Are conditions for assessing the performance essentially the same for all participants?

Fairness

Have all groups of students had an equal opportunity to acquire the knowledge or skills that are assessed?

Do tasks or items require knowledge or skills that are not directly related to the outcome being measured?

Section 7: Evaluating and Reporting Assessment Results

After the completing and receiving the assessment results, trainers will need to know how to use the information effectively. One important task is reporting the assessment results to the students, as well as, interested individuals and groups so that their needs for information are met. In addition, this will show whether or not they have a clear understanding of the assessment. Also reports will show if the objectives of the assessment were met by the skills or knowledge tested.

As there is no official grade assessed with the with the student's performance, evaluation is done to ensure that a student is prepared mentally and emotionally to go abroad. According Module 7, Theme 2 (JIU, 2010), assessment does not only establish a grade for their performance but guides them towards future study. Through evaluation and reporting, students will receive feedback that will enhance their study abroad experience; academically, personally, or career related. Through verbal group and one-on-one sessions, students will obtain information that will strength their survival skills, as well as be able to comment on areas of weakness. Through the feedback process trainers will also be able to note their concerns of student who may have potential problems abroad.

By addressing the concerns that arise from assessment tasks additional steps can be taking to help students. This may come in the form of redirecting a student to another program or postponing their participation. Should an assessment evaluation present it self to warrant a student to be redirected or program postponed, a verbal and written report of the findings will be given to the IEC Director. If an assessment shows issues related to academics, a verbal and written report will be given to the Faculty Director. Lastly UOEAP will receive a written report. Additionally, report information will be shared with UOEAP, when necessary, during annual conferences to discuses best practices of assessing students prior to departure.

Constituents of Assessment Information

Submit Assessment Results to:

Purpose

Form of Reporting

Study Abroad Participants

Participants will receive group and individual assessment result so that they can measure how effective their effort in learning. Also so to determine areas or weakness and strength gaining knowledge of material.

Verbal: group and

One-on-one

IEC Director

As needed: Group and individual assessment reports will be submitted to determine effectiveness of training, as well as, to bring to light participants who will have issues adjusting while abroad.

Verbal and Written

Faculty Director

As needed: Group and individual assessment reports will be submitted to determine effectiveness of training, as well as, to bring to light participants who will have issues adjusting while abroad.

Verbal and Written

UOEAP

As needed: Group and individual assessment reports will be submitted to determine effectiveness of training, as well as, to bring to light participants who will have issues adjusting while abroad. In addition, information will be used to discuss and develop best practices at other UC campuses.

Verbal and Written

Section 8: Cost-Benefit Analysis

Cost:

The total cost for pre-departure training is $4580 for two training cycles or $2290 per each cycle. This is based on the current cost of training for the 2009-10 academic year. Cost may increase or decrease based on the number of students going through training to cover cost of food and reproduction of materials.

Benefits:

Changing from a weekend retreat in the mountains to on campus training will reduce cost by $12000 for two training cycles. This reduction is the cost of cabins and food for 3 meals per day. Moving to on campus will allow training to take place over a 3 month period instead of one weekend. This will increase retention rate and allow for student to resolve issues earlier in the training process.

Benefit/ Cost Ratio:

The benefit/cost ratio is $1200/$4580 = 2.62 or 262% for two training cycles.

Saving:

The actual approximate saving is $7420 for two cycles, which is the actual saving for one academic year.

Program Cost Summary

Category

Unit

Cost

Room rental for 5 day Selection Maintenance Seminar

IEC Library

$0.00

Room Rental for 2 day Finance Meeting

Hub Rm 335

$10/per day

Room Rental for 2 day Academic Maintenance Seminar

Statistics B650

$10/per day

Room Rental for 2 day Health, Safety, and Wellness Orientation

Pentland Bearcave and Foxhole

$500/per day

Materials reproduction

handouts

$60

Media Services

equipment operator, sound system, dvd, 2 projectors, 2 wireless microphones, 1 cd player, and 2 screens

$250/per day

Supplies

envelopes, paperclips, easel pad

$50

Meals

lunch for 125 students/per orientation day

$320/per day

TOTAL EXPENSE

$2290/per training period

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