Philosophy Of Teaching Described As Philosophy Of Learning Education Essay

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I would consider my philosophy of teaching described as a philosophy of learning. I must adjust my teaching strategies on the pace of student learning and the depth of the students understanding in order to be an effective. Teaching is an interaction between the student and the teacher; this will affect the student's interaction on learning instead of my activities as a teacher.

I feel this approach to learning will emphasize on cognitive development - students learn best by actively exploring their environments. The trial and error of learning is supported in a place that facilitates understanding. Because the learning environment is self-paced by nature, the learning environment engages the students with the material and promotes meaningful association between new material and already known information (Jones, Araje, 2002). My responsibility will help students generate their own context for meaning through the application of new material to their daily lives.

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Human beings construct their knowledge and their abilities through the interactions and critical reflections (Jones, Araje, 2002). The abilities and knowledge vary according to their backgrounds, needs, and values. The student's social world includes the people that directly affect them including their friends, family, administration, and teachers. Because of this, collaborative learning is taken into account (Jones, Araje, 2002).

My teaching strategies include social constructivism including teaching within contexts that are personally meaning to the students, class discussion, and group collaboration. There is an emphasis on maintaining dialectic teacher guidance and student initiated exploration, along with social learning and individual learning (Jones, Araje, 2002). Some examples of such learning are that students come to class with an established worldview, formed by their prior learning and experience; students learn from the teacher as well as each other; and allowing and creating different opportunities for all the students to have a voice that promotes the construction of new ideas (Jones, Araje, 2002).

The constructivist perspective views learners as being engaged in making meaning and the teaching approach looks for what students can investigate, collaborate, analyze, share and build upon what they already know (Jones, Araje, 2002). In order for this to be done effectively, the teacher also needs to be a learner, as well as a researcher. They must have a greater awareness of the participants within the environment in their teaching situation so they may continually actively engage the students in learning. I believe that by utilizing constructivism characteristics within the classroom, students will be challenged to think critically and incorporate problem-solving skills. Hands on activities and assignments allow for the how and why behind the lesson.

With my philosophy, I will be able to encourage the students I work with to individualize their learning experience. I am able to provide the base for the assignments as they fill it in with content that is relevant to their interest, which results in a meaningful experience. My belief is that students should learn from one another and not just rely on the teacher to lecture and divulge all the answers. Therefore, it is essential to have a community of scholars to bring a multitude of experiences within the classroom that exposes students to a variety of opinions, methods, options, and beliefs.

Comparison Chart

Philosophy

Realism

Perennialism

Idealism

Essentialism

Pragmatism

Progressivism

Naturalism

Educational Value

Fixed, Absolute, Objective

Fixed, Absolute, Objective

Fixed Absolute, Objective

Fixed, Absolute, Objective

Relative, Subjective, Changeable

Relative, Subjective, Changeable

Relative, Subjective, Changeable

Educational Beliefs

Focuses on Teaching, Training and Disciplining the Mind

Focuses on Ideas that are Everlasting - Seek enduring Truths which are Constant, not Changing, through literature, art, philosophy, and religion

Focuses on Teaching, Training and Disciplining the Mind

Focuses on Common core, or The Basics of information and skills

Focuses on Actively Self Learning, Engaging in Problem Solving and Social Tasks

Focuses on Active Experimentation - Learning rooted in questions, interaction with others -Student Centered

Focuses on Actively Self Learning, Engaging in Problem Solving and Social Tasks

Educational Practices

Disseminates, Lecturing, and Dominates Instruction

Disseminates, Lecturing, and Dominates Instruction

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Disseminates, Lecturing, and Dominating Instruction

Disseminates, Lecturing, and Dominating Instruction

Facilitating, Coaching and Changing

Facilitating, Coaching and Changing

Facilitating, Coaching and Changing

Educational Methodologies

Mastery of Facts, Basic Skills Demonstration, and Recitation

Cognitive Learning and Disciplines

Handling Ideas, Lecture, and Discussion

Cognitive Learning and Disciplines

Problem Solving, and Project Method

Exploratory and Discovery

Exploratory and Discovery

Educational

Curriculum

Focuses on Matter of the Physical World - Science, and Math

Focuses on Reading, Writing and Arithmetic

Focuses on

Matter of Mind - Literature, History, Philosophy and, Religion

Focuses on Reading, Writing and Arithmetic

Focuses on Matter of Social Experience - Creating New Social Order

Focuses on the Arts and Sciences along with Reading, Writing and Arithmetic

Focuses on the Arts and Sciences along with Reading, Writing and Arithmetic

(Gutek, 2009)

These educational philosophical approaches are being used in classrooms today all over America. They are Realism, Perennialism, Idealism, Essentialism, Pragmatism, Progressivism, and Naturalism. With each of these philosophies, it is focused on what we teach and the curriculum we teach.

Realism

Realism holds that the real world exists independently of any experience. Realists are focused on all that is true and factual such as laws and principles (Gutek, 2009). Realism is focused on the physical world and that makes up the reality in which their philosophy is built around (Gutek, 2009). The curriculum that satisfies Realists is science and math.

Perennialsim

Perennialism's aim of education is to ensure that all students acquire the understanding about liberal topics (Gutek, 2009). Perennialists teach ideas that are long living and principles, not facts. They seek constant truth and believe that facts change constantly therefore they cannot be important to the world (Gutek, 2009). Cultivation of the intellectual mind is the highest priority in education. Curriculum focuses on attaining literacy, and student growth in disciplines rather than vocational.Like Essentialism, Perennialism accepts little flexibility in the curriculum however in contrast Perennialists focus on personal development rather than skills (Gutek, 2009).

Idealism

With Idealism, learners are stimulated to achieve identification with the mind (Gutek, 2009). Idealists come into a gradual mental awareness that leads to self-definition. This is based upon the understanding of the universe (Gutek, 2009). Idealists strive for the ideal. Idealism has a curriculum of focusing on the matter of the mind. Core subjects for Idealists are religion, philosophy, literature, and history.

Essentialism

Essentialism focuses on intellectual and moral standards; it focuses on fact and objective reality (Gutek, 2009). Teachers are the center of the classroom. The curriculum core focuses on the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic along with respect for authority, and discipline (Gutek, 2009). Essentialists believe that the common core of knowledge is transmitted to students systematically. Learning should be practical, and prepare students to become valuable members of society. Essentialism is similar to Perennialism with the exception that Essentialists accept that the core curriculum may change (Gutek, 2009). In addition, William Bagley created Essentialism in reaction to the Progressivist approach (Gutek, 2009).

Pragmatism

Pragmatists believe that in practical assumptions of the world of experience. Ideas are judged by their consequences (Gutek, 2009). Truth is warranted assertion. Pragmatism has values that are experienced within the context of ethical problems and issues and the consequences that follow (Gutek, 2009). Pragmatist's curriculum focuses in scientific problem solving and experiential learning.

Progressivism

Progressivism is about the whole child unlike Essentialism where the teacher is the center of the classroom. Students test ideas by experimentation and learning is rooted in questions through experience (Gutek, 2009). Learning is active where the learner is the problem solver or thinker who makes meaning through their experience. In the Progressive classroom, the teacher provides "active" or "doing" lessons that are derived from student's interests or questions (Gutek, 2009). Progressivists emphasize the process of how one comes to know. With Progressivism, students are citizens that are allowed the freedom to experience, and share in decision-making (Gutek, 2009).

Naturalism

Naturalism attempts to explain phenomena and account for natural values. Naturalism is considered the opposite of idealism. Naturalists search for causes and rarely account for reasons (Gutek, 2009). Naturalists believe that existence encompasses everything and there isn't anything that is supernatural. Naturalism is all about nature and the truths of nature (Gutek, 2009). The laws of nature govern life and individual goals are more important than society's goals. Naturalists believe that students will learn and develop in and through nature (Gutek, 2009). Physical well being enhances a readiness to learn mental, moral, and social skills.

School District Philosophy

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Basic philosophy of education is the study of questions as to what education is and what purpose does it serve for the knowing mind and human subject. It helps answer problems of authority and the relationship that exists between school districts and communities. Educational philosophies recognize that society depends on the education of the children, and in order to educate said students to be thoughtful, responsible, and members of the community. This responsibility of educators is an intricate and challenging task that requires deep understanding of moral values, political theories, ethical principles and the knowledge of who children are individually and within society.

The school district in which I work in has adopted the Progressivist philosophy of education in a sense. . They feel the purpose of school is to prepare students to live effectively within the world. Educators within said school district focus on the student. Our philosophy is called the Win-Win philosophy. This was incorporated so that every student succeeds. Said school district models this philosophy by their interactions with the students and staff within the school. They teach it and speak it by labeling everyday situations as win-win, win-lose, or lose-lose. When teachers and staff interact with the students about various student led conversations, teachers show them how each situation is either a win-win, win-lose, or lose-lose and then ask them how they might change the situation so that the outcome will be a win-win. By utilizing the Win-Win philosophy or a form of the Progressive philosophy, the district is able to go beyond reducing discipline problems and transform student's lives. When incorporating this philosophy, students will look for mutually beneficial solutions in all social interactions.

This philosophy begins and ends with the students. The first question asked to students is how he or she wants their class to be. Students are then asked to write a response to activate their prior knowledge and to make it relevant to them. Students are then asked to model what they want their class to be. In doing so, they will validate their position and become responsible for the outcome. Through modeling, students can understand what is expected of them and will continue to take full responsibility of their actions, good and bad. This creates student accountability and they begin to live the Win-Win philosophy.

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