Perceptions Regarding Inclusive Education In The Us Education Essay

Published:

This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

The total population studied was 200 teachers with different demographic profiles. Of them 66 teachers were men (33%) and 134 were women (67%). In terms of marital status, 38% were single (i.e 76 teachers) and the rest 124 teachers were married. Among the studied population again, 164 teachers were professionally qualified, while the rest 36 teachers did not receive any professional training. Experience wise 45% of the studied population had an experience of <10years (90 teachers) and the rest 110 teachers had an experience of >10 years.

The following pie charts depict the teachers' perceptions regarding inclusive education in the US. Following the order in part I of the questionnaire, the results have been discussed.

On being asked if they think that inclusive style of education helps students with special needs fare better academically, more than half of the respondents (65%) strongly agree that students with special needs are academically better in inclusive classrooms. Another 20% of teachers are also positive about this perception. Thus a vast majority of the surveyed population are positive towards the question of inclusivity as a help for special education in terms of academic improvement in students with special needs. 12% of the population was neutral on the issue and negative views were expressed by only a small minority of 0.75% who disagreed and 0.25% who strongly objected this view. Thus the overall teacher communities perception was found to be positive on this issue.

On being asked if they thought that the integration of special needs children into the general student community would affect the regular students in any way, only 8% of the respondents agreed of which only 5% strongly agreed that the placement of students with special needs in regular classes would in some way negatively affect the academic performance of normal students. 22% were neutral in their views and felt that inclusion might or might not have an effect on the regular student community. The rest of the 70% of the teachers surveyed disagreed to this view of which 40% strongly disagreed that inclusion might affect the regular students in any way. Again, the teachers response for inclusion seemed to be favourable in an overall majority.

To the question og whether or not back up support must be given to children with special needs in the inclusive set up to achieve the highest level of inclusion, 62% of the respondents strongly believed that back up support must be given to achieve the highest level of inclusion. Another 23% agreed to this view making the total favourable attitude to this view a majority of 85%. 5% of teachers were undecided on this view and only 10% had negative views. Among the 10% only 2% of the teachers strongly rejected this view.

On being asked if they thought that academically talented students will be isolated in an inclusive class setup, none of the teachers strongly accepted this view and only 3% agreed that such a possibility exists. 22% of the teachers were undecided as to whether or not inclusion might isolate the academically talented children. A majority og 42% teachers strongly rejected this view of isolation of the academically talented children in inclusive classes while 33% disagreed. Therefore a vast majority of teachers 75% think that academically talented children will not be isolated in inclusive class rooms.

To the fifth question as to ahether the placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms may affect the academic performance of mainstream students, 50% of the teaching community thought they strongly rejected this idea. Another 15% disagreed to the idea making a majority of 65% of teachers who thought that the placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms will not affect the academic performance of mainstream students.10% of the teachers surveyed were undecided on the issue while 25% accepted the idea of which 13% strongly felt that placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms may affect the academic performance of mainstream students and another 12% agreed.

To the question of whether children with special education needs will benefit from inclusive education, 78% of the teachers surveyed strongly accepted that children with special needs will benefit and another 12% agreed to the idea. Thus a total of 90% of the teachers thought that inclusivity benefits the children with special needs. Only 9% of the teachers had a negative view on the idea while 1% were undecided on the issue.

On being asked if they thought that children with special academic needs have a right to mainstream education, 72% of the teachers strongly accepted this view and another 18% agreed that children with special academic needs have a right to mainstream education. 5% of the teachers were undecided as to whether or not children with special academic needs have a right to mainstream education. A minority og 2% teachers strongly rejected this view of children with special academic needs having a right to mainstream education while another 3% disagreed. Therefore a vast majority of teachers 90% think that children with special academic needs have a right to mainstream education.

To the last question as to ahether the placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms may result in labeling of the chidren with special needs as weird, stupid or hopeless, and thus challenge the goal of inclusivity, 68% of the teaching community thought they strongly rejected this idea. Another 23% disagreed to the idea making a majority of 91% of teachers who thought that the placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms will not result in labeling of the chidren with special needs as weird, stupid or hopeless, and thus challenge the goal of inclusivity. 2% of the teachers surveyed were undecided on the issue while 7% accepted the idea of which 4% strongly felt that placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms may result in labeling of the chidren with special needs as weird, stupid or hopeless, and thus challenge the goal of inclusivity and another 3% agreed.

Part II:

In part II of the questionnaire, the perceptions of teachers from the US regarding the collaborative efforts between mainstream and special education teachers in an inclusive classroom were studied.

On being asked if they thought that special education teachers and regular mainstream teachers must work together to teach children with special academic needs in inclusive class rooms, 82% of the teachers strongly accepted this view and another 12% agreed that special education teachers and regular mainstream teachers must work together to teach children with special academic needs in inclusive class rooms. 1% of the teachers were undecided as to whether or not special education teachers and regular mainstream teachers must work together to teach children with special academic needs in inclusive class rooms. A minority og 2% teachers strongly rejected this view of children with special academic needs having a right to mainstream education while another 3% disagreed. Therefore a vast majority of teachers 94% think that special education teachers and regular mainstream teachers must work together to teach children with special academic needs in inclusive class rooms.

Inclusive education is a good concept, but its implementation is ineffective due to objections from mainstream classroom teachers. To this question as to ahether the implementation of inclusive educaiton is ineffective due to objections from mainstream classroom teachers, 12% of the teaching community thought they strongly rejected this idea. Another 18% disagreed to the idea making a total of 30% of teachers who did not think that the implementation of inclusive educaiton is ineffective due to objections from mainstream classroom teachers. 3% of the teachers surveyed were undecided on the issue while a majority of 67% accepted the idea of which 39% strongly felt that the implementation of inclusive educaiton is ineffective due to objections from mainstream classroom teachers and another 28% agreed.

To the third question as to whether or not mainstream teachers have a main responsibility towards the children with special needs placed in their regular clssrooms, 58% of the teaching community thought they strongly accepted this idea. Another 20% agreed to the idea making a majority of 78% of teachers who thought that mainstream teachers have a main responsibility towards the children with special needs placed in their regular clssrooms. 1% of the teachers surveyed were undecided on the issue while 21% did not favour the idea of which 10% strongly rejected the idea that mainstream teachers have a main responsibility towards the children with special needs placed in their regular clssrooms and another 11% disagreed.

On being asked if they thought that the presence of a special education teacher in the regular classrooms could raise difficulties in determining who really is responsible for the students with special needs, 62% of the teachers strongly accepted this view and another 12% agreed that the presence of a special education teachers in the regular classrooms could raise difficulties in determining who really is responsible for the students with special needs. 4% of the teachers were undecided as to whether or not the presence of a special education teacher in the regular classrooms could raise difficulties in determining who really is responsible for the students with special needs. A minority og 10% teachers strongly rejected this view that the presence of a special education teachers in the regular classrooms could raise difficulties in determining who really is responsible for the students with special needs while another 12% disagreed. Therefore a vast majority of teachers 74% think that the presence of a special education teacher in the regular classrooms could raise difficulties in determining who really is responsible for the students with special needs.

To the last question as to whether or not a special education teacher only helps the children with special needs placed in the clssrooms, 48% of the teaching community thought they strongly accepted this idea. Another 20% agreed to the idea making a majority of 68% of teachers who thought that a special education teacher only helps the children with special needs placed in the clssrooms. 10% of the teachers surveyed were undecided on the issue while 22% did not favour the idea of which 10% strongly rejected the idea that a special education teacher only helps the children with special needs placed in the clssrooms and another 12% disagreed.

Part III:

The third part of the questionnaire highlights some of the issues that needs the attention of the parties involved in implementing special education programs especially with reference to inclusive style of education.

To the first question as to whether or not mainstream education teachers possess the training and the skills to help the children with special needs placed in the clssrooms, 15% of the teaching community thought they strongly accepted this idea. Another 8% agreed to the idea making a minority of 23% of teachers who thought that mainstream education teachers possess the training and the skills to help the children with special needs placed in the clssrooms. 2% of the teachers surveyed were undecided on the issue while a majority of 75% did not favour the idea of which 50% strongly rejected the idea that a mainstream education teachers possess the training and the skills to help the children with special needs placed in the clssrooms and another 25% disagreed.

On being asked if they thought that children with special needs required extra help and attention in regular classrooms, 87% of the teachers strongly accepted this view and another 8% agreed that the children with special needs required extra help and attention in regular classrooms. none of the teachers were undecided as to whether or not the children with special needs required extra help and attention in regular classrooms. A minority og 3% teachers strongly rejected this view that children with special needs required extra help and attention in regular classrooms while another 2% disagreed. Therefore a vast majority of teachers 95% think that the children with special needs required extra help and attention in regular classrooms.

To the question og whether or not children with special needs in the inclusive set up to committed more disciplinary problems when compared to regular students, 58% of the respondents strongly believed that children with special needs in the inclusive set up to committed more disciplinary problems when compared to regular students. Another 34% agreed to this view making the total favourable attitude to this view a majority of 92%. 4% of teachers were undecided on this view and only 4% had negative views. Among the 4% 2% of the teachers strongly rejected this view and the other 2% disagreed that children with special needs in the inclusive set up to committed more disciplinary problems when compared to regular students.

Mainstream classroom teachers received little help from special needs teachers. To this question as to ahether the mainstream classroom teachers received little help from special needs teachers, 30% of the teaching community thought they strongly rejected this idea. Another 2% disagreed to the idea making a total of 32% of teachers who did not think that the mainstream classroom teachers received little help from special needs teachers. 10% of the teachers surveyed were undecided on the issue while a majority of 58% accepted the idea of which 34% strongly felt that the mainstream classroom teachers received little help from special needs teachers and another 24% agreed.

Lastly, to the question as to whether resources for students with special needs are limited in a mainstream classroom though inclusive education is important, only 2% of the teaching community thought they disagreed to the idea. Not surprisingly none of the interviewed teachers strongly rejected this idea that resources for students with special needs are limited in a mainstream classroom. 10% of the teachers surveyed were undecided on the issue while a majority of 88% accepted the idea of which 44% strongly felt that resources for students with special needs are limited in a mainstream classroom and another 44% agreed.

On being asked if they think that inclusive style of education helps students with special needs fare better academically, 85% of teachers were positive towards the question. The percentage of men and women who voted for inclusivity as a help for special education in terms of academic improvement in students with special needs were 37% men and 63% women. As both genders are unequally represented in the population, the percentages were controlled for based on representation. For the question of whether they thought that the integration of special needs children into the general student community would affect the regular students in any way 70% of the teachers surveyed disagreed of which 22% were men while 78% were women. To the question of whether or not back up support must be given to children with special needs in the inclusive set up to achieve the highest level of inclusion, 85% of the respondents strongly believed that back up support must be given to achieve the highest level of inclusion of which 35% were men and 65% were women.

On being asked if they thought that academically talented students will be isolated in an inclusive class setup, 75% think that academically talented children will not be isolated in inclusive class rooms of which 22% were men and 78% were women. To the fifth question as to ahether the placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms may affect the academic performance of mainstream students, 65% of teachers thought that the placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms will not affect the academic performance of mainstream students of which 25% were men and 75% were women. To the question of whether children with special education needs will benefit from inclusive education, 90% of the teachers surveyed strongly accepted that children with special needs will benefit of which 41% were men and 49% were women.

On being asked if they thought that children with special academic needs have a right to mainstream education, 90% of the teachers agreed of which 45% were men and 55% were women. To the last question as to whether the placement of children with special needs in regular clssrooms may result in labeling of the chidren with special needs as weird, stupid or hopeless, and thus challenge the goal of inclusivity, a majority of 91% of teachers disagreed of which 32% were men and 68% were women. The results show that overall women seemed to possess more positive attitude than men towards inclusivity. Students t-test was performed on the values obtained and hypothesis one was proved untrue. Hence, there is significant difference between male and female teachers in their attitudes towards the inclusion of special need students in general education classrooms".

46% were men and 54% were women. Inclusive education is a good concept, but its implementation is ineffective due to objections from mainstream classroom teachers. To this question as to whether the implementation of inclusive educaiton is ineffective due to objections from mainstream classroom teachers, 30% of teachers did not think that the implementation of inclusive educaiton is ineffective due to objections from mainstream classroom teachers of which 67% were men and 33% were women. To the third question as to whether or not mainstream teachers have a main responsibility towards the children with special needs placed in their regular clssrooms, 78% of teachers accepted this view of which 41% were men and 49% were women.

On being asked if they thought that the presence of a special education teacher in the regular classrooms could raise difficulties in determining who really is responsible for the students with special needs, 22% of the teachers disagreed this view of which 74% were men and 26% were women. To the last question as to whether or not a special education teacher only helps the children with special needs placed in the classrooms, only 34% disagreed of which 90% were men and 10% were women.

Statistical analysis of the test results show that 63.6% of positive attitude was shown by men towards inclusive education, with a standard deviation of +/-20.23 while 34.4% was shown by women, with a standard deviation of +/-17.78. A 2-tailed T-test was performed on the data obtained and the difference was not significant at 95% confidence interval. Hence there is no significant difference in the attitude of men and women towards collaborative efforts required towards the implementation of special education in a way that helps realize its goal.

To the first question as to whether or not mainstream education teachers possess the training and the skills to help the children with special needs placed in the clssrooms, a majority of 75% did not favour the idea of which 42% were men and 58% were women. On being asked if they thought that children with special needs required extra help and attention in regular classrooms, 95% of the teachers strongly accepted this view of which 45% were men and 55% were women. To the question og whether or not children with special needs in the inclusive set up to committed more disciplinary problems when compared to regular students, 92% of the respondents accepted this view of which 54% were men and 46% were women.

Mainstream classroom teachers received little help from special needs teachers. To this question as to whether the mainstream classroom teachers received little help from special needs teachers, 58% accepted the idea of which 39% were men and 51% were women. Lastly, to the question as to whether resources for students with special needs are limited in a mainstream classroom though inclusive education is important, a majority of 88% accepted the idea of which 52% were men and 48% were women.

Statistical analysis of the test results show that 46.4% of positive attitude was shown by men towards inclusive education, with a standard deviation of +/-6.42 while 51.6% was shown by women, with a standard deviation of +/-6.26. 2-tailed T-test was performed on the data obtained and the difference was not significant at 95% confidence interval. Hence there is no significant difference in the attitude of men and women towards improvements necessary in special education.

Based on the results of the study, in general, the teachers had a positive approach towards the inclusive model of education, a positive approach towards a collaborative effort to help reach the ultimate goal of inclusion and a positive approach towards the efforts to improve the inclusive programme. Further the study tested the hypothesis of gender bias in acceptance of the inclusive program among teachers and found that women were more accepting towards the inclusion of children with special needs and hence the goal of the program than men. The data was significant at the 99% confidence interval. Interestingly men were more positive for collaborative efforts than they were for inclusion as a whole although the data was not significant at the 95% confidence interval. Both men and women were positive about the need for improvements in the field and there was no significant difference in their attitudes based on the tool used.

Limitations of the study: The sample size is too small and hence not representative of all the schools in the united states. The number of women and men candidates interviewed are not the same and hence the study might have been more biased towards the view of women than men. Further studies with an enlarged sample drawn from all the states is needed to reach conclusions that can be said as true to the entire teaching population of the united states. This study should also differentiate teachers' attitudes towards the inclusion of different types of special education needs, which are thought to constitute an important parameter. The data must further be linked to attitudinal scores that link teacher attitude to either teaching effectiveness or to student outcomes which is yet to be explored.

Writing Services

Essay Writing
Service

Find out how the very best essay writing service can help you accomplish more and achieve higher marks today.

Assignment Writing Service

From complicated assignments to tricky tasks, our experts can tackle virtually any question thrown at them.

Dissertation Writing Service

A dissertation (also known as a thesis or research project) is probably the most important piece of work for any student! From full dissertations to individual chapters, we’re on hand to support you.

Coursework Writing Service

Our expert qualified writers can help you get your coursework right first time, every time.

Dissertation Proposal Service

The first step to completing a dissertation is to create a proposal that talks about what you wish to do. Our experts can design suitable methodologies - perfect to help you get started with a dissertation.

Report Writing
Service

Reports for any audience. Perfectly structured, professionally written, and tailored to suit your exact requirements.

Essay Skeleton Answer Service

If you’re just looking for some help to get started on an essay, our outline service provides you with a perfect essay plan.

Marking & Proofreading Service

Not sure if your work is hitting the mark? Struggling to get feedback from your lecturer? Our premium marking service was created just for you - get the feedback you deserve now.

Exam Revision
Service

Exams can be one of the most stressful experiences you’ll ever have! Revision is key, and we’re here to help. With custom created revision notes and exam answers, you’ll never feel underprepared again.