Meeting the challenges of teaching ell students

Published:

Educators in this course will study effective strategies and websites used to address the various needs of individual ELL students in their classrooms. Specific topics include gifted and talented identification and services, teaching diversity and tolerance, social emotional needs of ELL students and strategies to teach literacy to ELL students.

Text to Purchase:

See It, Be It, Write It, Using Performing Arts to Improve Writing Skills and Raise Test Scores by Dr. Hope Blecher Sass and Maryellen Moffitt

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able to:

Identify challenges, best practices and staff professional development needs associated with effective instruction for English Language Learners

Discuss the need for diversity and tolerance instruction for all students and staff and its impact on evaluating and selecting classroom materials and developing school wide policies

Evaluate issues related to English Language Learners and Bilingual students who are also Gifted and Talented

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Examine websites and technology that would be helpful when developing lesson plans and materials for English Language Learners and Bilingual students

Compare and contrast the social and emotional needs of English Language Learners with those of students for whom English is their primary language

Describe the role the social and emotional needs of English Language Learners may have on instruction and learning

Analyze and apply best practices for improving English Language Learners literacy by involving parents, the school and the community

Interpret national standards set forth in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and TESOL then develop lesson plans and grading rubrics incorporating those standards

Online Learning with Full Instructor Facilitation

Our institution maintains an online platform that automatically grades student pre- and post-assessments, monitors their participation in the lecture, and awards them credit when they post in the discussion area. Instructors will monitor the progress and quality of work the students provide, including the threaded discussions, and will provide feedback and evaluate the midterm and final projects.

Weekly Online Lecture Assignments:

Week 1 (Overview)

Text Reading: Read

http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/educatrs/leadrshp/le0gay.htm

A synthesis of scholarship in multicultural education

www.cftl.org/documents/2005/listeningforweb.pdf

A study of California ELL Teachers' Challenges, Experiences, and Professional Development Needs

Watch Video Clips

Clip 1: www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwg5g-WcXxE

Teaching English Language Learners Across the Curriculum

Clip2:http://www.learner.org/workshops/teachreading35/session6/sec2p2.html?pop=yes&pid=2191#

Teaching English Language Learners

Answer Questions:

What are some of the problems/challenges faced by ELL teachers? Does funding solve the problem? Why or why not? What problem do you perceive to be the most challenging? Why? Is your district adequately meeting the needs of ELL? Why or why not? Are you?

Assignment:

In the article about California ELL teacher's challenges, there are various problems listed that must be overcome to more adequately meet the needs of ELL students. Choose one problem discussed and develop a plan to improve the situation. Also explain your rationale for selecting that particular problem. Provide data to support your solution.

Discussion Board:

Students must submit one unique comment each week in regards to each of the assigned text reading and reply to a fellow student's comments at least twice each week. The comments should relate to the material the text reading discusses. Each comment should be at least three sentences in length. The week ends Sunday at 9:00 p.m.

Week 2 (Teaching Diversity and Tolerance)

Text Reading: Read

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3673/is_1_127/ai_n29301581/?tag=content;col1

Teaching diversity and tolerance in the classroom: a thematic storybook approach

See It, Be It, Write It, Using Performing Arts to Improve Writing Skills and Raise Test Scores by Dr. Hope Blecher Sass and Maryellen Moffitt. Read Pages 68-73:Social Emotional Learning and the Enactment Process

Watch Video Clips

Clip 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFF5-WDF9Ik

Vanderbilt University Professor Milner research, teaching and policy interests focus on urban education, race and equity in education and teacher education.

Clip 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnZ_u5_SUJw

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The role of books in teaching tolerance

Clip 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2CZuIojImA&feature=related

Corona High School teacher, Marcos Torres, talks about being culturally responsive in his classroom.

Answer Questions:

Do you think tolerance is something that can be taught in the classroom? Why or why not? Is it something you think should be taught in the classroom? Why or why not? What do you think should be done to students who display cultural bias in school, even after receiving tolerance training? What approach should be used to provide tolerance training to staff?

Assignment:

The reading from See It, Be It, Write It gives suggestions for songs that help to teach the message of tolerance and peace. Name at least five more songs that deal with multiculturalism and that may be used in your classroom. Provide the name of the song, who wrote the song and who performed it. Then, create a lesson plan incorporating your song. Make sure to include how you introduced the song to your students, a detailed explanation of the lesson, and a final project for the students to complete.

Discussion Board: Students must submit one unique comment each week in regards to each of the assigned text reading and reply to a fellow student's comments at least twice each week. The comments should relate to the material the text reading discusses. Each comment should be at least three sentences in length. The week ends Sunday at 9:00 p.m.

Week 3-(G&T ELL)

Text Reading: Read 1-4

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/eric/e520.html

Identifying and serving recent immigrant children who are gifted

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/eric/e480.html

Meeting the needs of Gifted and Talented Language Minority Students

http://www.sengifted.org/articles_multicultural/Gallagher_schools_parents_other_countries.pdf

Meeting the needs of Gifted and Talented Language Minority Students

http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Meeting_Needs_Gifted

The underrepresentation of minority language students in gifted programs

Video Clips

Clip 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AY6PhtCLrTg

Equal Access: Universal Design Instruction

Clip 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5dodTlc1sc

Teaching Creative and Critical Thinking Skills

Answer Questions:

Why is it difficult to identify language minority gifted? Is there funding for Gifted and Talented in your state? Does your district have a Gifted and Talented program? Why or why not? Does your district address the needs of ELL gifted? Why or why not?

Assignment:

After reading the articles about Language Minority G&T students and after watching the video about UDL, apply the concepts presented in the video to successfully meet the needs of the highly able ELL students in your class. Create a lesson to be presented to your class based upon the information provided and the differentiated strategies presented.

Discussion Board: Students must submit one unique comment each week in regards to each of the assigned text reading and reply to a fellow student's comments at least twice each week. The comments should relate to the material the text reading discusses. Each comment should be at least three sentences in length. The week ends Sunday at 9:00 p.m.

Midterm Project Due

Week 4-(Great Websites for ELL Teacher)

Text Reading: Read

http://www.everythingesl.net/inservices/elementary_sites_ells_71638.php

Elementary Web Sites for English Language Learners

http://www.oxfordseminars.com/esl-teaching-resources/classroom-and-teacher-resources

Games and activities that can be played on-line

Watch Video Clips

Clip 1: http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com

Infusing Technology into ELL instruction

Answer Questions

How can technology support the literacy development of ELL students? Do ELL students respond well to technology? Why? Why do you think video is considered a powerful tool for working with ELL?

Assignment: On the teachertrainingvideos.com site there are almost forty terrific videos about effective projects and strategies to be used with ELL students. The videos are listed to the left of the page. Click on ten titles to investigate ten projects. Choose your favorite video and create a project based upon the training provided. For example, make a movie using "Zimmer Twins" or create an avatar using "Voki." Upon completion, state why you think this project would be effective with ELL students.

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Discussion Board: Students must submit one unique comment each week in regards to each of the assigned text reading and reply to a fellow student's comments at least twice each week. The comments should relate to the material the text reading discusses. Each comment should be at least three sentences in length. The week ends Sunday at 9:00 p.m.

Week 5 (Social Emotional Needs of ELL students)

Text Reading: Read

http://www.learningpt.org/pdfs/ConnectResearchPractice_ELL_IntroGuide.pdf

Connecting Social Emotion Needs to Content Knowledge

www.fcd-us.org/usr_doc/MythsOfTeachingELLsEspinosa.pdf

Challenging common myths about young English Language Learners

Watch Video Clips

Clip:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETHQztHHqKM

Individual Learner Differences

Answer Questions:

Are the social and emotional needs of ELL students different than the social emotional needs of students whose first language is English? What role do social emotional skills play in academic success of the student? Do you have a counselor in your school that is fluent in languages other than English? When was that person hired? Do you think this is important to have multilingual counselors? Why or why not? Are many of your ELLs placed in Special Education programs? If so, why do you think this is happening?

Assignment:

Create a chart of social emotional needs of ELL students. Check those needs that are aligned to ELL students only. Why does this specific list of needs exist? Why are they different from English speaking students? Write about how you would address two social emotional needs in your classroom.

Discussion Board: Students must submit one unique comment each week in regards to each of the assigned text reading and reply to a fellow student's comments at least twice each week. The comments should relate to the material the text reading discusses. Each comment should be at least three sentences in length. The week ends Sunday at 9:00 p.m.

Week 6 (ELL Literacy Instruction)

Text Reading: Read

www.ericdigests.org/2003-4/ece.html

Thematic Literature and Curriculum for English Language Learners

Watch Video Clips

Clip 1: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hrw66BL-Izo

Literacy, ELL and Digital Storytelling: 21st Century Learning in Action

Clip 2: http://www.spike.com/video/every-teacher/3139119?cmpnid=716&pt=sr&refsite=7103

Research-based practices that help every student

Answer Questions:

How would you explain the importance of literacy to the parent of an ELL? What school and community supports can be made available to the families and students whose home is not rich in literacy?

Assignment:

Select 5 books that you feel would work well as read alouds to ELL students. Write a brief synopsis of each book and tell why you chose it.

Discussion Board: Students must submit one unique comment each week in regards to each of the assigned text reading and reply to a fellow student's comments at least twice each week. The comments should relate to the material the text reading discusses. Each comment should be at least three sentences in length. The week ends Sunday at 9:00 p.m.

Final Project

Discussion Board:

Students must submit one unique comment each week in regards to each of the assigned text reading and reply to a fellow student's comments at least twice each week. The comments should relate to the material the text reading discusses. Each comment should be at least three sentences in length. The week ends Sunday at 9:00 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time

If a student works ahead during the six week course they should still post every week for the automatic scoring software to count the postings.

Students are reminded to check the announcement section of the discussion board frequently for items of interest from the faculty.

Students are also reminded to use the email, not the discussion board, to ask questions or make comments directed to their facilitator.

Methods of instruction: Percentage of Course Credit

Video Lectures 20%

Textbook/Articles Readings 10%

Midterm project 25%

Final project 30%

Discussion Board interaction (weekly submissions) 10%

Participation 5%

Grading criteria/system and evaluation activities:

A faculty member will be reviewing students' answers and providing feedback. Students will be evaluated on their creativity and ability to incorporate techniques from the lecture into the discussion board, research papers, examples, lesson plans and teacher work samples.

University Grading Criteria

Grade Equivalent

97-100% A+

93-96% A

90-92% A-

87-89% B+

83-86% B

80-82% B-

77-79% C+

73-76% C

70-72% C-

69% or below U

Attendance/Participation

It is expected that students will attend all instructional sessions, complete all required activities, and field assignments.

Students who do not post in the discussion area during the first week of class AND do not notify the instructor in advance will be dropped from the course and may be charged a course drop fee.

University Computer Lab/Library Services

Please refer to Section VI in the Student Handbook.

Disability Services

Please refer to Section VII in the Student Handbook.

Due dates of major assignments and projects:

Midterm Project Due Date: TBA

Final Project Due Date: TBA

MIDTERM PROJECT

Activity: Evaluation of Your Lesson Plans and Methods

Due:

Potential Total Points: (15% of grade)

Select two of your students, one a general education student and one an ELL or Bilingual student.

Evaluate three (3) of your lesson plans to see if you are effectively writing and using teaching methods to meet the educational needs of both students.

Write an 8-12 page paper explaining the necessary changes in your lessons. Use the information from the text and videos to explain why and how you have made the changes in your planning and teaching methods in order to meet the needs of all children in your class.

FINAL PROJECT

Design a Lesson Planning Rubric

Due:

25% of grade

Based on the strategies and implementation plans presented in this course, design a rubric for you to use to compare your own lesson plans against the demands of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the national TESOL standards, and your district's lesson plan requirements. Include in your rubric the provision for adaptation and modifications for all levels of students, the provision for aligning lessons to standards and benchmarks, types of questions, and improvement plans focused on student performance on high stakes tests. Describe how your rubric is used to evaluate one of your actual lesson plans. Turn in your original lesson plan, rubric and modified lesson plan.

Scoring Rubric for Assignment

Total Value: 100 Points

Content of Report - Value: 70 points - Introduction, Rubric, description, and modified lesson plans, conclusion (recommendations for using research in the classroom).

Quality of Writing - Value: 20 points - Written work shows superior graduate quality in verbal expression, attention to detail, and correct application of the conventions of the English language. In students' written work, paragraphing is appropriate with clear thesis statements and supporting details. Sentences are clear and concise. Students vary sentence structure making use of subordinate clauses. Transitional words and phrases are used effectively. Points and ideas are well organized. Word choice is effective. English language conventions are applied correctly (i.e. spelling, capitalization, punctuation, agreement, pronoun usage, sentence structure). 

Format - Value: 10 points - Cover Page, Reference Page and where applicable, citations and references are used correctly and consistently, with clear efforts made to include a wide range of relevant works. For any work requiring citations, students refer to a wide range of suitable sources. All non original ideas are cited correctly and referenced in a reference list. All works in the reference list are cited in the text. Students should follow the writing format and style as required by the APA Publication Manual, 5th Edition.