Effective Use Of Career Information Resources Education Essay

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Part A

The career guidance program "Selection into Action" will be designed for full time students completing a dual qualification at Swinburne University - TAFE, School of Business (Certificate IV Front Line Management and Diploma of Management). The main purpose of the dual qualification is to provide students with practical management skills and leadership competencies required in today's commercial environment. The qualification content serves as an induction module for brand new team leaders and aims to educate students in using innovative approaches to managing people and projects, managing finances and implementing continuous improvement strategies. The students spend a total of 648 hours in the classroom, where they undertake a mix of guided and self-directed learning, assignments and workshops. Such classes will enable the students to participate in active discussions, problem-solving exercises, workshops and various presentations related to efficient management practices, business operations and human resource procedures. Upon completion of these two courses, the obtained qualifications will provide the students with a guaranteed place at Swinburne's University higher education degree program with an equivalent of one year credit.

A selection of staff were interviewed to determine their perceptions of students' career education needs. The participants were asked about what they thought were the barriers to making sound career decisions for the students. Also the participants were invited to comment about students' confidence levels when approaching career-related decisions and the aspirations that they largely aimed for. All members of the school community including teachers, administrators, counsellors, senior educators and managers were invited to provide input that they thought would be important in regards to the development of the career program. This information was collected and classified into recurrent themes, each representing the foremost career education needs of the students. These identified needs were then used to develop the career guidance program.

Firstly, the data obtained from Swinburne's administrators indicates that for 60 - 100 students who enrol in the management program, the ratio of male and female students is approximately equal. These students come from a variety of cultural backgrounds characteristic of the current Australian demographics. Ninety percent of the students' average age at the time of enrolment is between eighteen to twenty, most of whom are, enrolling immediately or shortly after completing high school. Further administrative data shows that they are low-achieving students and their high school VCE and ATAR results vary between the 50th and 65th percentile. Administrative data also indicates that an average of ten percent of the students completing the qualification successfully will obtain employment related to the completed field of study.

Interviewing the teachers revealed that the students lack the ability to undertake a personalized, analytical study of a chosen occupation and present their findings in a report format. Also, they struggle with the use and evaluation of information sources that could assist them to narrow down their options of a suitable choice of occupation/employer or course they could enter once they complete their qualification. In addition to this , their inability to relate theoretical frameworks of the taught material to real life scenarios is one of the main obstacles they face when trying to conceptualise the real working environment. Taking a critical stance on theory and testing it against real-life experiences is an idea that students find hard to grasp and implement. Hence, teachers at Swinburne TAFE believe that by promoting the value of increased student interaction with local businesses and volunteering opportunities will greatly benefit the career development of all students. Moreover, one of the initiatives that teachers are recommending to be considered for implementation in the career guidance program is the opportunity for students to visit external companies to undertake projects and write reflective reports on what they've learned from their workplace experiences, either in a paid or unpaid capacity.

In this context employers would be contributing to the curriculum, advising students directly about the world of work and their requirements, which would be a particularly valuable intervention. The initiative to have at least one employer presentation as part of the career guidance program is also strongly supported by the teachers.

Teachers also reported incident of classroom misbehaviour from a small number of students that can often influence the remaining students. Teachers acknowledged the fact that young people are often influenced by sources that they don't quite understand and are often outside of their control. However, they recognized that by assisting the students to understand how these influences can potentially affect them, can significantly change any negative outcomes. For example, introducing concepts such as emotional intelligence and/or finding a mentor, organizing work experience and placements, can act as significant modifiers of social functioning. Helping students identify and connect with role models can facilitate a sense of internal control and future time perspective, which can lead to the development of effective problem-solving skills (Super, 1990).

Career counsellors employed by the university reported that according to their experience with TAFE students, approximately ninety percent of the students need to develop skills that will give them legitimate confidence in their ability to construct fulfilling lives. In order to develop these skills the students need assistance with these important developmental areas: focus on who they are, what they have to offer and what is important to them; direction, knowing their options, knowing their interests and what appeals to them with a focus on identifying career goals; adaptability, the skill of making the best of ever-present change and planning for the future; healthy self-esteem that will enable them to counter and overcome uncertainty and doubt. Furthermore, the students struggle with finding and creating suitable job opportunities and the key challenge for them is to source the best information and then use it appropriately.

Undoubtedly, for careful planning of career education it is vital and necessary to use theoretical insights to guide the process of career development programs. Considering influences such as abilities, personality, interests and values on the process of decision making is one of the main focus areas of theories of content. The premise of these theories is that an increase in self-knowledge matched with occupational knowledge will assist in making an objective and logical career decision. One of the legacies that these theories have offered is an abundance of career assessment instruments that measure these influences, with specific focus on personality. Hence, these theories have been described as "test and tell" (Crites, 1981, p.49) and they are embedded in the work of Holland (1973, 1997). Holland's theory is based on the premise that a career choice is an expression of personality and when choosing a career, people search for environments that will be congruent with their personality type. In regards to these personality characteristics, individuals can be categorized as one of six types: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, or Conventional (RIASEC) (Holland, 1997). Holland's theory can assist the students in understanding their career dilemma by focusing their attention on their personality characteristics and how they will interact with their potential working environment. In particular, his Self-Directed Search (SDS; 1985) career assessment instrument will provide the students with a tool which they can use to assess their vocational personality and match it with particular occupations.

Super, as one of the dominant contributors in the theories of process, theorized that our career decisions reflect our attempts to translate our self-understanding into career terms (Super, 1984). Super was first to acknowledge that career development continues throughout the lifespan of an individual. He stated that our vocational preferences and skills and the situations in which we live and work, inclusive of our self-concepts, change with time and experience, i.e. each individual goes through stages. According to Super, these students will be in the exploration stage of their development, confronted with the career development task of crystalizing and specifying occupational preferences. An accurate and current self-assessment will increase their personal awareness and understanding of self, which in turn will enable them to make better career decisions. Self-awareness will improve their ability to seek and select jobs that best fit their unique self-concept. Subsequently, they will have to learn about the career decision making process, obtaining information and translating the information into a career plan. Savickas (2005) advanced Super's theory by suggesting that an individual will construct their career by the meaning they attach to their experiences. Enabling the students through this career guidance program to understand and put into perspective the things that they are experiencing in their own lives in terms of career choice and the possibility that they might feel confused, alone, lost, anxious, different and concerned about their current status will reassure the students that it is 'normal' to feel a bit anxious during a transitional period.

To develop an understanding of the changing world and the dynamic nature of the world of work is also relevant in terms of creating a career guidance program. This dynamic is driven by increasing change in age, gender and demographics issues, change in organizations structures with flatter structures, fewer managers with devolved responsibility and authority etc. New businesses, industries and jobs are developing, involving tasks, services and products that may not have existed before. In the same time, many known vocations are becoming obsolete. In this world of work, individuals may experience a more than one career in a lifetime (Jarvis, 2003). The relationship between the organization and its employees is also changing. A relationship once based on tenure and mutual loyalty is now based on economical and profit driven short-term contracts (Patton & McMahon, 2006). In fact, Australia has one of the most casualized labour markets in the developed world and this may have an impact on current and future skill formation and conditions of employment (Nelson & Tonks, 2007). Employability, rather than securing a job (Watts, 2005) is becoming a key factor in having a successful career in today's world. In this sense, employability is the competence of the individual to have the knowledge, skills and attitudes to engage and reengage in employment. Therefore, an open attitude for lifelong learning and professional development is a crucial factor for maintenance of such capacity.

The goal of this career education program will be to enable the students to understand, personalize or apply the competencies required for career management. These competencies are reflective of the long-standing conceptual framework of knowledge about self, the world of work and decision making as described in the Australian Blueprint for Career Development (ABCD) (Miles Morgan Australia, 2003). (See Appendix 1)

Part B

INTRODUCTION

"Selection into Action" describes the purpose and importance of Swinburne's School of Business career guidance program, its content, and its unique approach to teaching and learning. It outlines the approaches that teachers and career counsellors are expected to take when coaching students on how to develop their learning, managing and interpersonal skills in the area of career planning. It also outlines all the program planning strategies, accountability measures and the roles and responsibilities of all involved - teachers, managers, career counsellors, administrators, community partners and students.

RATIONALE

To have a successful career in today's world, students need valuable work habits and the ability to make sound decisions, solve problems, plan effectively, work independently and in a team, communicate well, research, evaluate themselves realistically, and explore new educational and career opportunities. A comprehensive and well executed career guidance program will prepare the students with skills for a lifetime of working, learning and living in our current uncertain and ever changing world. It will provide them with an understanding of what type of capability, attitude, thinking and creativity is required to prosper in an indeterminate and unknowable future. Accordingly, the students will develop skills and competencies to work cooperatively and productively with a diverse range of people, to set and pursue education and career goals, to evaluate the accomplishment of these goals, assume their responsibilities and understand the changing nature of life and work roles. At the core of this program is a focus on adaptability, not only within the workplace, but the local, national and global labour market. Inherently, this requires a skill sets, interests and competencies of self-awareness. This program endeavours to aid the student in finding this self-awareness, and creating transferrable skills through the self-discovery process.

This program will provide the students with an understanding of concepts in three areas: personal management, learning and work exploration, and career building. It will provide students with many opportunities to practice these newly acquired skills in a supportive and structured environment, where they can learn from feedback from their teachers, peers, guidance counsellors and community mentors. Furthermore, this program will assist the students to relate learnt classroom material to the community, understand the true value of education and how it relates to the world-of-work, recognize all the learning opportunities available to them, make choices among those opportunities and adapt to changing circumstances. It will also help them to better handle transitional periods in their lives, with an aim to increase the employment success rate upon completion of the qualification.

Through learning activities that involve identifying personal characteristics and attributes, setting goals, problem solving, assertiveness, collaborating and cooperating, students will learn how to identify behaviours and attitudes that reflect their self-concept, how to interact positively and effectively with others and how to respond to change.

GOALS, OBJECTIVES & REQUIRED OUTCOMES

In today's world those who will flourish are self-managing individuals who know their strengths and their limitations, have the confidence to follow their dreams and are willing to seek help and support from others. It is important at this developmental level to stimulate curiosity and raise self-awareness and self-assurance in students with the use of career intervention. Students who are curious about their emerging self-concepts (e.g. interests, skills, personality type and values) are more likely to engage in exploratory behaviour to acquire the information they need for self-concept clarification (Super, 1981). Efficacy beliefs influence how people think, feel, motivate themselves, and act (Bandura, 1955). Many researchers (Lent, 1994, 1996) have shown that self-efficacy beliefs play a crucial role in determining intellectual goals, carer choices and subsequent success. Hence the first competency in this career guidance programs is related to developing self-awareness skills. The presumption that "What people subjectively believe about themselves is a key determinant rather than what is objectively the case" (Kumar, 2007, p. 79) plays an important part in making career decisions. To be consistent with the requirements of the Australian Blueprint for Career Development (ABCD) (Miles Morgan Australia, 2003) the goals, objectives and required outcomes in this program will be illustrated as, competencies, performance indicators and local standards:

Competency 1: Understand yourself

Develop abilities to discover who you are and maintain a positive self-concept

Performance Indicator: Assess how your personal characteristics, interests, values, skills and personality are reflected in your life, learning and work goals.

Local Standard: Students will identify and prioritize at least four areas of interest, abilities, strengths, values and personal characteristics that could influence their career decisions. Students will accurately identify job opportunities that correspond with their strengths and personalities.

Competency 2: Recognise the role of emotional intelligence in the workplace

Gain insight into the bilateral influence between yourself and others

Performance indicator: Analyse the influence of your personal attitudes and beliefs and assess their effect on the working environment.

Local Standard: Students will complete a checklist that will give them insight into how their attitudes are reflected in their actions. Students will ask two other people (of their choice) to respond to the same checklist. Students will then compare these answers with their own and accurately draw conclusions on how they are perceived versus their own self-concept.

Competency 3: Change and grow throughout life

Learn how to respond to change that affects you and your wellbeing

Performance Indicator: Demonstrate effective communication skills in stressful situations (for example: assertiveness, conflict resolution and problem solving) that you can utilise and build upon in a wide variety of situations.

Local Standard: The students will be observed as they participate in a problem solving activity within a small group/team. They will be assessed on their ability to demonstrate assertiveness and conflict resolution. The marker for success in this exercise is the students' ability to conduct themselves respectfully within the group while showing initiative and being an active contributor. Each student will then be provided with feedback from the teacher. The teacher will assess the students' capacity to maintain a positive attitude whilst maintaining respect for the feelings of others.

Competency 4: Effective use of career information resources

Discover the importance of effective information search

Performance indicator: Locate and evaluate a range of career information sources

Local Standard: Students will be provided with a starting source for job searching and creation of job opportunities. Students will be required to source three other employment resource services, which they will then accurately compare in terms of validity and reliability. Students will be expected to explain in detail the relevance and effectiveness of these sources. Also, student will be expected to complete an information interview with an individual that they have identified as working in their occupation of interest.

Competency 5: Engage in career decision making

Demonstrate effective career decision-making skills, knowledge and attitudes.

Performance Indicator: Describe groups of occupations that relate to personal interest and abilities

Local Standard: In a report student will need to accurately define types of occupations and/or courses that will hold their interest and be able to distinguish between these and the ones to avoid; Find occupational sectors and employer organizations which would fit their interest and values; Demonstrate personal responsibility for their own career decisions and creation of job opportunities by engaging with community businesses and organisations relevant to their chosen field of interest. This engagement will need to be either in a format of volunteering or

Competency 6: Engage in lifelong learning

Participate in continuous learning

Performance Indicator: Demonstrate personal responsibility for creating job opportunities

Local Standard: Students will create a profile within an online professional network and/or join a professional association related to their occupational interest; students will write an in-depth report based on an information interview conducted with an individual that is working in an occupation of interest.

Competency 7: Understanding the relationship between work, society and the economy

Understanding how globalization impacts the organizational operations and the effects on individuals and society

Performance Indicator: Explore how trends (such as social, demographic, technological, occupational and industrial trends) can positively and negatively affect work and learning opportunities.

Local Standard: Students will work in groups to identify and then further explore three significant trends and implications on personal career planning. Students will be expected to accurately define how these trends influence the changes of business operations, employers and jobs requirements in Australia. In addition, presentation referring to the impact of economical and global trends on business will be delivered by a business representative from a large company, such as Ford or Toyota Australia.

PROGRAM DELIVERY COMPONENTS AND ACTIVITIES

The career counsellor will ensure that the career education program plan will be delivered in the following manner:

Workshop 1: Acquaintance and Orientation

This introductory session the student will learn about the objectives and the goals of the career guidance program. Also, the students will be advised of their own responsibilities and the commitment that they will need to make to effectively participate in the program. Subsequently the counsellor will make the inventory Self Directed Search (SDS), Holland 1994, available to be undertaken via Swinburne's intranet website. This inventory will measure interest in the Holland's six personality types and occupational groups and will require 20 - 30 minutes time for completion. Upon obtaining the results the students will be required to print and familiarize themselves with their personal results and bring their score to the second scheduled workshop.

Workshop 2: Identify occupations that relate to your personality, interest, strengths and abilities

This session will include an explanation of Holland's theory and will then proceed with an interpretation of the interest inventory. Samples of several different profiles will be projected on a screen and each section of the inventory report will be explained to the students. Then the students will be asked to analyse their own reports and the counsellor will invite the students to ask any questions that they might have. The students will then be asked to consider career opportunities that correspond to the results of their inventories, and postulate fields of further occupational interest.

Workshop 3: Making the most from the opportunities presented

This session will focus on emotional intelligence and transferable skills deemed essential for learning and employability. The students will be given an emotional intelligence checklist and be expected to compare their answers with other people of their choice. Subsequently students will be given a case study where in groups of four will be required to demonstrate problem solving and conflict resolution skills in relation to the case study.

Workshop 4: Source information effectively and make sound career decisions

As today information is available in different formats and in abundance, it can frequently amount to an 'information overload'. In this session it will be shown to the students how to manage information and make the most of opportunities. Students will be provided with a staring resource for job searching and job opportunities. Students will then be expected to source three other resources and evaluate and compare their reliability, effectiveness and relevance to their particular situation/ field of interest. In addition the students will be taught how to conduct an information interview and will be given a template that they will be expected to complete within a fortnight.

Workshop 5: Explore possible occupational careers and use various tools to create job opportunities

In this session the students will become familiar with the 80/20 rule of job opportunities, discover how to locate appropriate job opportunities relevant to identified field of interests and will use professional and social networks, professional websites, and employment agencies as tools to create job opportunities. Students to present the outcomes from the information interview that they have conducted with an individual who is working in their occupational field of interest.

Workshop 6: Understanding the changing world we live in

Using Prezi (new and sophisticated audio-visual presentation tool) the counsellor will describe the nature and the future of our rapidly changing high-tech world; the complexity of our lives and the difference between our grandparents and parents' lifestyles; the systematic changes in the workplace and how these will affect individual careers; and how individuals will need to take responsibility for their own career choices. Subsequently the students will be asked to complete two activities. Upon completion of those activities, a 30min presentation from Ford or Toyota will be delivered on the impact of globalization and manufacturing in Australia.

RESOURCES

Approval to use the Self Directed Search (SDS) interest inventory and uploading the inventory to Swinburne's intranet website

Advertise workshops through all TAFE media in cooperation with Swinburne's marketing department

Print handouts for students through totalling 15 pages pet student

Book lecture theatre that can accommodate up to 100 students to attend six scheduled workshops

Refreshments for students during workshop (biscuits and coffee/tea)

Use of audio-visual equipment

Counsellor time for developing Prezi presentation, interpreting interest inventories, facilitating six workshops, developing feedback surveys for students feedback, interviewing teachers to obtain feedback and reviewing assessment results

Support and involvement of teachers and other staff involved in the creation and delivery of the program

Secure a presentation from HR or Operational Manager from Ford or Toyota Australia

PRORGRAM CONSIDERATIONS

Ethics and Confidentiality - Participants are made aware of their entitlement to professional and confidential service, the obligations of the counsellor to meet the Professional Standards for Career Development Practitioners and the laws, policies and professional ethics that pertain to client rights .

Awareness for program users - All participants in the program are made aware of the purpose and the goals of the service offered, inclusive of limitations. In addition to that, participants are made aware of their rights, entitlements, and complaints procedures etc., but also of responsibilities and rules of engagement.

Program free of stereotyping - Information presented is free of stereotyping based on age, race, culture, religion, sexuality, gender, ethnicity, nationality and disability

Induction and ongoing support for teachers - All teachers that will participate in the program are formally inducted into the program and are made aware of their responsibilities and duties, inclusive of ongoing support through mentoring, feedback and coaching.

EVALUATION

Based on the premise that "The introduction of any program or service reflects a personal, social and organisational investment that needs to be reviewed" (Athanasou, 2007, p.22) this career education program must be evaluated to determine its effectiveness. In the evaluation process a specific framework will be used, based on the recommendations from James Athanasou - "Evaluating Career Education and Guidance" 2007, reviewing six items:

1. Program ethical considerations and its impact on privacy and confidentiality - ???

2. What were the workshops attendance rates and what is the completion rate of the tasks and assessments given in the program - Teachers must continually observe, assess, and evaluate students' achievement of competencies in all components of the career education program. Information based on assessments achievement will help improve student learning and it will identify areas for program improvement. It will assist teachers and counsellors determine how well their planned career exploration activities and other components of the career education program are working, and will help them to make any changes required to succeed in achieving the program goals.

3. What is the overall cost of the program - ???

4. Did the program achieve its key objectives on all four levels: Reaction, Learning, Behaviour and Results (Kirkpatrick, 1996). Reaction - Student feedback is paramount in assessing the effectiveness of the program in regards to student satisfaction. This can be facilitated through student feedback forms which can be completed anonymously at the conclusion of the program. These forms can be made available via the Swinburne's website for the students' convenience. Learning - The teachers and career counsellors will need to gauge whether students have engaged with the information provided in the workshops through the responses provided in their reports and assessments. The quality of information provided by students by the discussions and reasoning's within the classroom setting. Behaviour - Teachers and facilitators of the program will need to provide feedback in terms of their opinions on the workshops and the classroom experience with the students. Teachers may be interviewed in a one on one setting; feedback may also be sought through a collective meeting at the conclusion of the program. Another aspect for consideration is the response provided by support staff, such as careers counsellors who were initially interviewed about the current needs of students. Their observations (i.e. if they notice a marked difference in student involvement and initiative) would be a critical factor in the evaluation of the program. Results - The effectiveness of the program may also be evaluated by looking at student employment rates after the program, and comparing figures between students who participate in the program and those who do not, keeping in mind the figures already known (10% of current students go on to steady employment related to their qualification - Diploma of Management). This objective data is the key in providing a solid evaluation of the wider impact of the program.

5. What is the net effect of the program - ???

6. Have all the stakeholders of the program been provided with an opportunity for input and feedback - ???

Appendix 1 - The competencies of "Selection into Acton" illustrated:

Appendix 2 - Implementation and Scheduling

Workshop 1 - Acquaintance and Orientation

Specific Objectives

Activities/Discussion Topics

Persons Involved

Time Frame

Logistics

Resources Needed

During this session the students will:

Introduce one another by name and familiarize themselves with each other's backgrounds

Discover basic ground rules, various member roles and responsibilities

Learn program goals and objectives, in addition to program limitations

Understand their own responsibilities related to the program

Acquaintanceship

" Introductions in sitting order"

Orientation on Career Guidance Program: Explanations and Open Forum

Information of the role of a career counsellors employed by Swinburne

Student participation rights, entitlements and complaints register explained

Teachers

Career Counsellor

Administrators

Senior Educators

Manager - Leadership Learning

Student Advisor

Two hour session

Scheduled for 10am till 12pm

Commencement date - Second week of the semester

Lecture theatre provided by the TAFE, School of Business

Biscuits and coffee/tea made available

Audio visual gadgets

Posters

Tables and chairs

Writing board

Markers

Erasers

Pencils

Name stickers

Colour pens and

Butcher paper

SDS Inventory completed

Inventory made available on Swinburne website

Students

By week four

Internet and PC

Workshop 2 - Identify occupations that relate to your personality, interest, strengths and abilities

Specific Objectives

Activities/Discussion Topics

Persons Involved

Time Frame

Logistics

Resources Needed

During this session the students will:

Learn about Holland's theory and its relevance to career guidance

Discover one's own aptitudes, strengths and interests

Relate own aptitudes, strengths and interests to occupational areas

Disregard occupational fields unsuited in light of interest inventory

Orientation of Holland's theory

"Occupational Hexagon"

Voicing out your personality, strengths, interest and abilities

"Self-Awareness"

You and the world of work

"Desirable occupations" &

"Undesirable fields of interests"

Teachers

Career Counsellor

Administrators

Two and half hour session

Scheduled for 10am till 12.30pm

Commencement date - Fourth week of the semester

Lecture theatre provided by the TAFE, School of Business

Biscuits and coffee/tea made available

Audio visual gadgets

Tables and chairs

Writing board,

Markers

Erasers

Pencils,

Name stickers,

Colour pens and

Butcher paper

Workshop 3 - Making the most from the opportunities presented

Specific Objectives

Activities/Discussion Topics

Persons Involved

Time Frame

Logistics

Resources Needed

During this session the students will:

Differentiate between IQ and EQ (emotional intelligence)

Understand types of emotional intelligence skills

Identify personal transferable skills

Demonstrate assertiveness, problem solving and conflict resolution skills

Complete checklist on EQ

"How your attitude is reflected in your actions"

Group work discussion and role play based on a case study:

"Discover your problem-solving and assertiveness skills"

Teachers

Career Counsellor

Administrators

One and half hour session

Scheduled for 10am till 11.30pm

Commencement date - Sixth week of the semester

Lecture theatre provided by the TAFE, School of Business

Biscuits and coffee/tea made available

Audio visual gadgets

Posters

Tables and chairs

Writing board

Markers

Erasers

Pencils

Name stickers, Colour pens and

Butcher paper

Workshop 4 - Source information effectively and make sound career decisions

Specific Objectives

Activities/Discussion Topics

Persons Involved

Time Frame

Logistics

Resources Needed

During this session the students will:

Access information from a career information website www.myfuture.edu.au,

Gather first hand-information from employers

Learn how to conduct and information interview

Search for career information resources

Discuss in a group of students about the difference and type of information that could be obtained from career information resources

Outline the relevance, effectiveness and reliability of these career information resources

Information interview template provided

Teachers

Career Counsellor

Administrators

One and half hour session

Scheduled for 10am till 11.30pm

Commencement date - Eight week of the semester

Lecture theatre provided by the TAFE, School of Business

Biscuits and coffee/tea made available

Audio visual gadgets

Posters

Tables and chairs

Writing board

Markers

Erasers

Pencils

Name stickers, Colour pens and

Butcher paper

Workshop 5 - Explore possible occupational careers and use various tools to create job opportunities

Specific Objectives

Activities/Discussion Topics

Persons Involved

Time Frame

Logistics

Resources Needed

During this session the students will:

Learn about the 80/20 job market

Discover how to locate appropriate job opportunities relevant to identified field of interest

Use professional and social networks, professional websites , employment agencies as tools to create job opportunities

How can unadvertised openings be found

Professional vs. social networking

Building your network "Elevator speech"

PC session - Be aware: What is your online reputation?

Information interview template completed and presented to class

Teachers

Career Counsellor

Administrators

Two hour session

Scheduled for 10am till 11.30pm

Commencement date - Tenth week of the semester

Lecture theatre provided by the TAFE, School of Business

Biscuits and coffee/tea made available

Prezi

Audio visual gadgets

Posters

Tables and chairs

Writing board

Markers

Erasers

Pencils

Name stickers, Colour pens

Workshop 6 - Understanding the changing world we live in

Specific Objectives

Activities/Discussion Topics

Persons Involved

Time Frame

Logistics

Resources Needed

During this session the students will:

Develop an understanding of the changing world

Investigate and report back to class on different aspects of the changing world

Find out what is meant by:

- Change in organizations (flatter structures, fewer managers, devolved responsibility, contracting work etc.)

- The international dimension (the 'global web'; 'knowledge workers'; outsourcing)

4. Presentation from a business representative (Ford or Toyota)

Discuss - Heraclitus quote (c. 500BC) "Nothing is permanent but change"

Discuss - Friedman's advice (Friedman, 2007, p.217)

In 1970 "Tom - finish your dinner - people in China and India are starving" vs. todays' "Girls, finish your homework - people in China and India are starving for your jobs"

Questions forum for the presenter

Teachers

Career Counsellor

Administrators

Local business representative

Two hour session

Scheduled for 10am till 11.30pm

Commencement date - Twelfth week of the semester

Lecture theatre provided by the TAFE, School of Business

Biscuits and coffee/tea made available

Prezi

Audio visual gadgets

Posters

Tables and chairs

Writing board

Markers

Erasers

Pencils

Name stickers, Colour pens and

Butcher paper

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