Cultural Diversity in urban school settings

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DeKalb County has about 800,000 residents in an urban setting, which represents 10% of greater Atlanta. The county's racial make-up is approximately 55% African American , 36% White , .25% Native American , 5.00% Asian , 0.05% Pacific Islander , 4% from other races , and 2.5% from two or more races 9.% of the population are  Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The average income per household is $50,000 yearly and the average income for a family is $55.000. The per capita income for the county is about $24,000. About 10% of families are below the poverty line . 

 The school system is culturally diverse, with about 100,000 students, 143 schools and 13,000 full-time staff employees and approximately 15, 550 teachers. The student to teacher ratio is 25 to 1. The school system graduates over 5000 students, but only 40% pursue college, post secondary opportunities, though 60% qualify for Hope Scholarship.  Let us take a chronological look into the work history of Dr. Lewis. It is as follows. 

 1977 - Hired as a physical education teacher at Montgomery Elementary School in north DeKalb. 

 1984 - Named principal of Montgomery Elementary. 

 1990 - Named principal of Snapfinger Elementary School in south DeKalb. 

 1993 - Named county Principal of the Year 

 1994 - Wins $25,000 Milken Award, a national honor considered to be the Oscar of teaching. 

 1997 - Moves into central office role as executive director. 

 2002 - Promoted to senior executive director for professional learning and student assignment. 

 Oct. 2004 - Named DeKalb superintendent, replacing Johnny Brown. 

 2005 - Ends Brown's more controversial policies, such as the "Dress for Success" school uniform mandate. Talks to parents about the need for new attendance lines to balance school enrollment. Consolidates staff and cabinet posts. 

 Feb. -- April 2006 - Ousts popular Lakeside High School principal over bias claims, then reinstates him after student and parent outcry. Hires new human resources director, then fires him when a background check reveals the man lied on his resume and was a convicted criminal, a past associate. 

 Sept. -- Dec. 2006 - System-wide redistricting plan unveiled what amounted to a new vision for DeKalb schools. Lewis said the change would save $4 million annually, by pooling and using resources more efficiently. 

 March 2007 -  DeKalb voters approve continuing a one-cent-on-the-dollar sales tax for school construction. 

 May 2007 -  School board approves redistricting plan that includes closing five small elementary schools, redrawing attendance lines for 18 other schools and moving several notable school choice programs to different campuses. Nothing like this had been done in DeKalb for decades. 

 October 2007 - Board approves Lewis' plans to expand school choice programs in at least 38 schools over the next four years. Plan is delayed by the recession. 

 Jan. 2008 - Rejects deal by Florida-based developer Sembler Co. for prominent school property on North Druid Hills Road in central DeKalb. 

 Early 2008 - Told by school board members to reduce staff, which begins long road of cuts caused by sour economy. 

 Nov. 2008 - Budget plan approved, including more than $20 million in reductions. Begins internal review of Patricia "Pat" Pope, the system's chief operating officer, about allegations of bid rigging in the school construction program. 

 Feb. 2009 - Turns over findings of internal review to the county district attorney. 

 June 2009 - DeKalb eliminates 217 jobs, including 127 through layoffs. Teachers were not cut. Talk of budget cuts continued through year. 

 Jan. 2010 - Board increases Lewis' annual salary by $15,000 and extends his contract to 2013, just as the system faces additional proposed cuts to make up $115 million shortfall. 

 Feb. 2010 - District attorney's office investigators search Lewis' home in Stone Mountain as well as system buildings. Lewis takes paid leave. 

 April 16 -- The DeKalb school board votes unanimously to terminate Lewis. He will receive four months of severance pay (about $85,000) and will be allowed to retire under the negotiated agreement. 

   

             During the past three years Superintendent Lewis and the board of education met with the community, teachers, and staff several times. During these meetings, he became hostile with teachers that voiced their dissenting views, and questioned the working location of the teacher. The president of  Dekalb Educators informed Dr. Lewis that he should not retaliate against the employees.  He shared that the budget was in a severe crisis, which necessitated budget cuts for employees. It was also noted that the chief financial officer reviewed the budget several times. The second year the board voted to give the teachers a raise, but Lewis disapproved and refused to accept the DeKalb Board of Education's decision. The school year of 2009, the DeKalb Board of Education voted to not place any matching funds in the retirement account of staff, nor for teachers. They were also given several furlough days.  However, it was later discovered that several people who worked at the county office received promotions and raises that ranged from $5,000.00 to $65,000.00.  In addition to that, Dr. Lewis demanded to be compensated with a hefty raise for himself, since he was then an experienced superintendant. The board of education voted to give him a raise, and placed additional money into his retirement account. Several of the lower paid staff and custodians were terminated, while the overstaffed higher paid county office administrators were not terminated.  This action had serious repercussions for bus drivers whose homes were going into foreclosure status and other workers who, without notice were suddenly jobless, though other office personnel were receiving $20,000 and better bonuses.  Teachers, staff, and the community were livid. 

             The morale of the teachers, and staff plummeted to an all time low.  Dr. Lewis refused to listen to the cries of the lower salaried employees. He ignored the many concerns and issues of the employees, and changes that existed in educational reform. What happened to this caring and professional man who sought to bring DeKalb into premiere status in our nation?  

             Superintendent Lewis appears to have been someone who surrounded himself with individuals who would not challenge him to greatness.  His choice of personnel was based on attempts to do favors for friends and their children.  He did not choose qualified persons with experience or integrity to fill major positions.  It appears his desire to be liked and appreciated by his immediate peers and friends superseded his ability to reason well and exercise fiscal responsibility. 

             Superintendent Lewis' first meeting with teachers was to tell them that he was working with them to improve instruction for the system, but later alienated himself from them when they tried to discuss instructional concerns.  He purchased a college bound program (Springboard) for millions without having teachers and other instructional personnel's commitment.  The program was obsolete within the second year, when others found the material did not provide opportunities to build pre-requisite skills.  Millions of dollars were lost.  All the components to be used with the program were never purchased.  

             Teachers were driven to follow a pacing chart that did not lend itself to flexibility based on the students' need.  Teachers who did not comply with the pacing chart were written up, or penalized when they received their teacher evaluation.  Overwhelmingly, students scored 25-50% on the program's quizzes, and that was seen as successful, but the math teachers could not challenge it.  The focus was so much on the Superintendent's idea about Springboard that some principals abandoned using the instructional textbooks to impress him.  It was obvious that focusing on supplemental material is not enough when covering core subject matter.  When math scores did not rise to his expectations, the teachers were blamed for the lack of instructional fortitude.  The attitude was very negative toward teachers, and so the line of communication regarding instruction was closed, as teachers began to understand that they were not in partnership with the Superintendent.  

             The atmosphere regarding teachers fulfilling instructional duties became adversarial and destructive.  He deputized principals to get rid of teachers who were not with his focus, thereby the instructional process became one of politics and not quality.  

             Those principals seeking promotion quickly seized their opportunity to require outward signs of compliance to impress the Superintendent, rather then try to find ways to supplement and inform him of the program's shortcomings. Thus, any failure on state tests was immediately directed toward teachers.  This was unfortunate as the representatives and trainers of the Springboard program did not advise any school system to use their product as an absolute without textbook usage.  Students who were struggling with the English language barrier and special education students were not exempt from the mayhem.   As a matter of fact the college bound program took precedent over their actual program requirement, which led to much confusion at the local school level, heavily impacted by at-risk students.  Teachers who were passionate about student learning skills such as, how to do fractions, and recall time tables, though the program did not provide opportunities for that phase of preparation, were written up.  Principals who were trying to impress the Superintendent did not make allowances and arbitrarily wrote up many teachers who deviated  (the witch hunt syndrome).    Some good teachers moved on to other counties, while those who remained in Title-I schools lost respect for the Superintendent, as an instructional leader.  

             Those principals who called the press and talked about how great the program was got brownie points, while other principals began to listen to their teachers.  A rift was created among principals who worked with their teachers, and those who were tough on their teachers.  Those who were tough on the teacher knew how to play a political game to gain favor and could get almost anything they ordered, while others couldn't.  And so politics became a major factor in appointments to head principal-ship.  Principals who wrote up teachers and talked tough to them were more likely to be promoted than those who did not.  Over a five year period there are more principals in Title-I schools who are somewhat hostile to teachers as a result of political games.  Politics became a driving factor for some principals who wanted to be promoted to the county office, to receive major pay increases, resulted in those who were desperate and unqualified performing test erasures, altering data to make AYP. 

             The Superintendent had been confronted about the manner in which he addressed issues regarding teachers, but he denied it several time; however, in one incident he was taped and could not deny it.  

             Schools not heavily impacted by the Title-I dilemma are going on without a lot of change in personnel and are not as political.  Those schools do not appear to have a difficult time meeting state requirement, without having to implement all the components of a system-wide program. 

             Recently another program was purchased that did not meet the county's expectations eight years ago, so it was replaced three years later with Springboard.  Now the old program is back in the schools and the performance level of math students has plummeted.  Teachers were watched and scrutinized vigorously, but the results were as they had been in 2007.  Again, the blame is on teachers, despite their pleading with the county's instructional team regarding prerequisite skills. 

             In retrospect, due to the shortfall in the budget there is not enough money to fund the old program effort without bankrupting the county and cutting more jobs, so teachers will have more opportunity for input in the Superintendent's absence.  Politics is not front and center now, because he is being tried for unethical and corrupt conduct, at present politics is not a major factor as some principals are not sure what the next Superintendent will expect. 

             Lewis's desire was to keep schools in troubled communities opened, because every school would perform admirably, but this has not happened.  Funding for school activities were being cut before the housing crisis, and now those cuts are more extensive due to the economy.   In 2012, DeKalb County is slated to close 12 schools due to the housing crisis and the fact that more parents that are affluent are moving into other communities, or are finding ways to get their children into a better school district.    

             In the beginning "the mission of the DeKalb County School System was to form a collaborative effort between home and school that maximizes students' social and academic potential preparing them to compete in a global society."  Dr. Lewis outlined his objectives as the following: 

 To narrow the achievement gap and improve the graduation rate by creating a high performance learning culture in all schools and sites. 

   

 To increase rigor and academic achievement in Reading/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies in Pre K-12. 

   

 To ensure quality personnel in all positions. 

 To ensure fiscal responsibility in order to maintain safe and healthy learning environments that support academic programs, resources and services. 

             As we evaluate DeKalb's graduation rate compared to other county's we find the district is number 17 (88%) of the 20 counties in comparison.  The county's graduation rate ten years ago was 97.2%, the average ACT score was 21%, the dropout rate was 1.3, and the money spent per students was $7,791.  

 To narrow the achievement gap and improve the graduation rate by creating a 

             high performance learning culture in all schools and sites. 

   

             His claim to fulfill his goals was not authentic when you consider that the dropout rate is still at 50%.  DeKalb County does not focus on the student remaining in school, rather rounding up those drop-outs through GED or alternative programs.  The achievement gap between students is still too significant to substantiate progress in the elementary and middle grades; however, the gap in achievement in the high school setting has narrowed in some respect.  The fact that more students who are African American and Hispanics are a large percentage of the dropout rate in high school takes away from the gains.  Perhaps if their scores were entered the percentage of gains for African American would be widened. 

   

 2004   elementary 

 African American  79 

 White                     94 

 Hispanic                 64 

 2005 

 African American   85 

 White                      96 

 Hispanic                  74 

 2006 

 African American   72  

 White                       95 

 Hispanic                  66 

 2007 

 African American  77  

 White                      95 

 Hispanic                  74 

 2004     middle 

 African American       78   

 White                          93 

 Hispanic                      58 

 2005 

 African American    78  

 White                       94 

 Hispanic                   60 

 2006 

 African American  78    

 White                      94 

 Hispanic                  67 

 2007 

 African American    80 

 White                       95 

 Hispanic                   72 

 2004    high 

 African American       92 

 White                          97 

 Hispanic                     n/a 

 2005 

 African American      92 

 White                         98 

 Hispanic                    n/a 

 2006 

 African American   93 

 White                        98 

 Hispanic                  n/a 

 2007 

 African American    95 

 White                       97 

 Hispanic                  n/a 

   

 To increase rigor and academic achievement in Reading/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies in Pre K-12. 

   

 While students continue to improve in reading and English, which was on an upward trend, prior to his leadership, mathematics and science are still areas of concerns.  In fact, the mathematics district scores (2010) declined to what they were in 2007, even with the new programs.  Perhaps a conversation with math teachers would be meaningful.  The science and social studies scores were among the worst in the state. 

 To ensure quality personnel in all positions. 

             DeKalb county's newspaper is filled with stories revealing the unethical behaviors of his chosen employees.  Blog's, television reports, and interviews questioning administrative personnel's behavior are a media event.  The state's erasure analysis indicates DeKalb's head principals and assistant principals have taken matters into their own hand in their attempt to make AYP.  some have resulted to wearing gloves. 

             In conjunction to this lack of ethics, teachers have complained about being pressured by administrators to give grades to students they have not earned, in order to decrease the failure ratio for the district. 

 To ensure fiscal responsibility in order to maintain safe and healthy learning environments that support academic programs, resources and services. 

 The headlines of the county's papers indicate that Superintendent Lewis is being examined for gross mismanagement of funds; charges of racketeering and bribery are major issues in the case against him.  Examining Lewis's performance as a superintendent is controversial for those who want to believe in him, despite statistics, facts and evidence indicate he has fallen short of being a great leader. 

 DeKalb County has about 800,000 residents in an urban setting, which represents 10% of greater Atlanta. The county's racial make-up is approximately 55% African American , 36% White , .25% Native American , 5.00% Asian , 0.05% Pacific Islander , 4% from other races , and 2.5% from two or more races 9.% of the population are  Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The average income per household is $50,000 yearly and the average income for a family is $55.000. The per capita income for the county is about $24,000. About 10% of families are below the poverty line . 

 The school system is culturally diverse, with about 100,000 students, 143 schools and 13,000 full-time staff employees and approximately 15, 550 teachers. The student to teacher ratio is 25 to 1. The school system graduates over 5000 students, but only 40% pursue college, post secondary opportunities, though 60% qualify for Hope Scholarship.  Let us take a chronological look into the work history of Dr. Lewis. It is as follows. 

 1977 - Hired as a physical education teacher at Montgomery Elementary School in north DeKalb. 

 1984 - Named principal of Montgomery Elementary. 

 1990 - Named principal of Snapfinger Elementary School in south DeKalb. 

 1993 - Named county Principal of the Year 

 1994 - Wins $25,000 Milken Award, a national honor considered to be the Oscar of teaching. 

 1997 - Moves into central office role as executive director. 

 2002 - Promoted to senior executive director for professional learning and student assignment. 

 Oct. 2004 - Named DeKalb superintendent, replacing Johnny Brown. 

 2005 - Ends Brown's more controversial policies, such as the "Dress for Success" school uniform mandate. Talks to parents about the need for new attendance lines to balance school enrollment. Consolidates staff and cabinet posts. 

 Feb. -- April 2006 - Ousts popular Lakeside High School principal over bias claims, then reinstates him after student and parent outcry. Hires new human resources director, then fires him when a background check reveals the man lied on his resume and was a convicted criminal, a past associate. 

 Sept. -- Dec. 2006 - System-wide redistricting plan unveiled what amounted to a new vision for DeKalb schools. Lewis said the change would save $4 million annually, by pooling and using resources more efficiently. 

 March 2007 -  DeKalb voters approve continuing a one-cent-on-the-dollar sales tax for school construction. 

 May 2007 -  School board approves redistricting plan that includes closing five small elementary schools, redrawing attendance lines for 18 other schools and moving several notable school choice programs to different campuses. Nothing like this had been done in DeKalb for decades. 

 October 2007 - Board approves Lewis' plans to expand school choice programs in at least 38 schools over the next four years. Plan is delayed by the recession. 

 Jan. 2008 - Rejects deal by Florida-based developer Sembler Co. for prominent school property on North Druid Hills Road in central DeKalb. 

 Early 2008 - Told by school board members to reduce staff, which begins long road of cuts caused by sour economy. 

 Nov. 2008 - Budget plan approved, including more than $20 million in reductions. Begins internal review of Patricia "Pat" Pope, the system's chief operating officer, about allegations of bid rigging in the school construction program. 

 Feb. 2009 - Turns over findings of internal review to the county district attorney. 

 June 2009 - DeKalb eliminates 217 jobs, including 127 through layoffs. Teachers were not cut. Talk of budget cuts continued through year. 

 Jan. 2010 - Board increases Lewis' annual salary by $15,000 and extends his contract to 2013, just as the system faces additional proposed cuts to make up $115 million shortfall. 

 Feb. 2010 - District attorney's office investigators search Lewis' home in Stone Mountain as well as system buildings. Lewis takes paid leave. 

 April 16 -- The DeKalb school board votes unanimously to terminate Lewis. He will receive four months of severance pay (about $85,000) and will be allowed to retire under the negotiated agreement. 

   

             During the past three years Superintendent Lewis and the board of education met with the community, teachers, and staff several times. During these meetings, he became hostile with teachers that voiced their dissenting views, and questioned the working location of the teacher. The president of  Dekalb Educators informed Dr. Lewis that he should not retaliate against the employees.  He shared that the budget was in a severe crisis, which necessitated budget cuts for employees. It was also noted that the chief financial officer reviewed the budget several times. The second year the board voted to give the teachers a raise, but Lewis disapproved and refused to accept the DeKalb Board of Education's decision. The school year of 2009, the DeKalb Board of Education voted to not place any matching funds in the retirement account of staff, nor for teachers. They were also given several furlough days.  However, it was later discovered that several people who worked at the county office received promotions and raises that ranged from $5,000.00 to $65,000.00.  In addition to that, Dr. Lewis demanded to be compensated with a hefty raise for himself, since he was then an experienced superintendant. The board of education voted to give him a raise, and placed additional money into his retirement account. Several of the lower paid staff and custodians were terminated, while the overstaffed higher paid county office administrators were not terminated.  This action had serious repercussions for bus drivers whose homes were going into foreclosure status and other workers who, without notice were suddenly jobless, though other office personnel were receiving $20,000 and better bonuses.  Teachers, staff, and the community were livid. 

             The morale of the teachers, and staff plummeted to an all time low.  Dr. Lewis refused to listen to the cries of the lower salaried employees. He ignored the many concerns and issues of the employees, and changes that existed in educational reform. What happened to this caring and professional man who sought to bring DeKalb into premiere status in our nation?  

             Superintendent Lewis appears to have been someone who surrounded himself with individuals who would not challenge him to greatness.  His choice of personnel was based on attempts to do favors for friends and their children.  He did not choose qualified persons with experience or integrity to fill major positions.  It appears his desire to be liked and appreciated by his immediate peers and friends superseded his ability to reason well and exercise fiscal responsibility. 

             Superintendent Lewis' first meeting with teachers was to tell them that he was working with them to improve instruction for the system, but later alienated himself from them when they tried to discuss instructional concerns.  He purchased a college bound program (Springboard) for millions without having teachers and other instructional personnel's commitment.  The program was obsolete within the second year, when others found the material did not provide opportunities to build pre-requisite skills.  Millions of dollars were lost.  All the components to be used with the program were never purchased.  

             Teachers were driven to follow a pacing chart that did not lend itself to flexibility based on the students' need.  Teachers who did not comply with the pacing chart were written up, or penalized when they received their teacher evaluation.  Overwhelmingly, students scored 25-50% on the program's quizzes, and that was seen as successful, but the math teachers could not challenge it.  The focus was so much on the Superintendent's idea about Springboard that some principals abandoned using the instructional textbooks to impress him.  It was obvious that focusing on supplemental material is not enough when covering core subject matter.  When math scores did not rise to his expectations, the teachers were blamed for the lack of instructional fortitude.  The attitude was very negative toward teachers, and so the line of communication regarding instruction was closed, as teachers began to understand that they were not in partnership with the Superintendent.  

             The atmosphere regarding teachers fulfilling instructional duties became adversarial and destructive.  He deputized principals to get rid of teachers who were not with his focus, thereby the instructional process became one of politics and not quality.  

             Those principals seeking promotion quickly seized their opportunity to require outward signs of compliance to impress the Superintendent, rather then try to find ways to supplement and inform him of the program's shortcomings. Thus, any failure on state tests was immediately directed toward teachers.  This was unfortunate as the representatives and trainers of the Springboard program did not advise any school system to use their product as an absolute without textbook usage.  Students who were struggling with the English language barrier and special education students were not exempt from the mayhem.   As a matter of fact the college bound program took precedent over their actual program requirement, which led to much confusion at the local school level, heavily impacted by at-risk students.  Teachers who were passionate about student learning skills such as, how to do fractions, and recall time tables, though the program did not provide opportunities for that phase of preparation, were written up.  Principals who were trying to impress the Superintendent did not make allowances and arbitrarily wrote up many teachers who deviated  (the witch hunt syndrome).    Some good teachers moved on to other counties, while those who remained in Title-I schools lost respect for the Superintendent, as an instructional leader.  

             Those principals who called the press and talked about how great the program was got brownie points, while other principals began to listen to their teachers.  A rift was created among principals who worked with their teachers, and those who were tough on their teachers.  Those who were tough on the teacher knew how to play a political game to gain favor and could get almost anything they ordered, while others couldn't.  And so politics became a major factor in appointments to head principal-ship.  Principals who wrote up teachers and talked tough to them were more likely to be promoted than those who did not.  Over a five year period there are more principals in Title-I schools who are somewhat hostile to teachers as a result of political games.  Politics became a driving factor for some principals who wanted to be promoted to the county office, to receive major pay increases, resulted in those who were desperate and unqualified performing test erasures, altering data to make AYP. 

             The Superintendent had been confronted about the manner in which he addressed issues regarding teachers, but he denied it several time; however, in one incident he was taped and could not deny it.  

             Schools not heavily impacted by the Title-I dilemma are going on without a lot of change in personnel and are not as political.  Those schools do not appear to have a difficult time meeting state requirement, without having to implement all the components of a system-wide program. 

             Recently another program was purchased that did not meet the county's expectations eight years ago, so it was replaced three years later with Springboard.  Now the old program is back in the schools and the performance level of math students has plummeted.  Teachers were watched and scrutinized vigorously, but the results were as they had been in 2007.  Again, the blame is on teachers, despite their pleading with the county's instructional team regarding prerequisite skills. 

             In retrospect, due to the shortfall in the budget there is not enough money to fund the old program effort without bankrupting the county and cutting more jobs, so teachers will have more opportunity for input in the Superintendent's absence.  Politics is not front and center now, because he is being tried for unethical and corrupt conduct, at present politics is not a major factor as some principals are not sure what the next Superintendent will expect. 

             Lewis's desire was to keep schools in troubled communities opened, because every school would perform admirably, but this has not happened.  Funding for school activities were being cut before the housing crisis, and now those cuts are more extensive due to the economy.   In 2012, DeKalb County is slated to close 12 schools due to the housing crisis and the fact that more parents that are affluent are moving into other communities, or are finding ways to get their children into a better school district.    

             In the beginning "the mission of the DeKalb County School System was to form a collaborative effort between home and school that maximizes students' social and academic potential preparing them to compete in a global society."  Dr. Lewis outlined his objectives as the following: 

 To narrow the achievement gap and improve the graduation rate by creating a high performance learning culture in all schools and sites. 

   

 To increase rigor and academic achievement in Reading/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies in Pre K-12. 

   

 To ensure quality personnel in all positions. 

 To ensure fiscal responsibility in order to maintain safe and healthy learning environments that support academic programs, resources and services. 

             As we evaluate DeKalb's graduation rate compared to other county's we find the district is number 17 (88%) of the 20 counties in comparison.  The county's graduation rate ten years ago was 97.2%, the average ACT score was 21%, the dropout rate was 1.3, and the money spent per students was $7,791.  

 To narrow the achievement gap and improve the graduation rate by creating a 

             high performance learning culture in all schools and sites. 

   

             His claim to fulfill his goals was not authentic when you consider that the dropout rate is still at 50%.  DeKalb County does not focus on the student remaining in school, rather rounding up those drop-outs through GED or alternative programs.  The achievement gap between students is still too significant to substantiate progress in the elementary and middle grades; however, the gap in achievement in the high school setting has narrowed in some respect.  The fact that more students who are African American and Hispanics are a large percentage of the dropout rate in high school takes away from the gains.  Perhaps if their scores were entered the percentage of gains for African American would be widened. 

   

 2004   elementary 

 African American  79 

 White                     94 

 Hispanic                 64 

 2005 

 African American   85 

 White                      96 

 Hispanic                  74 

 2006 

 African American   72  

 White                       95 

 Hispanic                  66 

 2007 

 African American  77  

 White                      95 

 Hispanic                  74 

 2004     middle 

 African American       78   

 White                          93 

 Hispanic                      58 

 2005 

 African American    78  

 White                       94 

 Hispanic                   60 

 2006 

 African American  78    

 White                      94 

 Hispanic                  67 

 2007 

 African American    80 

 White                       95 

 Hispanic                   72 

 2004    high 

 African American       92 

 White                          97 

 Hispanic                     n/a 

 2005 

 African American      92 

 White                         98 

 Hispanic                    n/a 

 2006 

 African American   93 

 White                        98 

 Hispanic                  n/a 

 2007 

 African American    95 

 White                       97 

 Hispanic                  n/a 

   

 To increase rigor and academic achievement in Reading/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies in Pre K-12. 

   

 While students continue to improve in reading and English, which was on an upward trend, prior to his leadership, mathematics and science are still areas of concerns.  In fact, the mathematics district scores (2010) declined to what they were in 2007, even with the new programs.  Perhaps a conversation with math teachers would be meaningful.  The science and social studies scores were among the worst in the state. 

 To ensure quality personnel in all positions. 

             DeKalb county's newspaper is filled with stories revealing the unethical behaviors of his chosen employees.  Blog's, television reports, and interviews questioning administrative personnel's behavior are a media event.  The state's erasure analysis indicates DeKalb's head principals and assistant principals have taken matters into their own hand in their attempt to make AYP.  some have resulted to wearing gloves. 

             In conjunction to this lack of ethics, teachers have complained about being pressured by administrators to give grades to students they have not earned, in order to decrease the failure ratio for the district. 

 To ensure fiscal responsibility in order to maintain safe and healthy learning environments that support academic programs, resources and services. 

 The headlines of the county's papers indicate that Superintendent Lewis is being examined for gross mismanagement of funds; charges of racketeering and bribery are major issues in the case against him.  Examining Lewis's performance as a superintendent is controversial for those who want to believe in him, despite statistics, facts and evidence indicate he has fallen short of being a great leader. 

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