Access To Education Improved In Ethiopia Education Essay

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So has there been an improvement to education in Ethiopia? According to my research it has improved greatly. Since Ethiopia emerged from 16 years of civil war in 1991; access to education has improved significantly (development progress). The civil war had slowed down Ethiopia's growth of Ethiopia by approximately a decade, not only did the civil war slow down the growth of Ethiopia but it reversed the growth already made. Approximately 3 million pupils were in primary school in 1994/95; by 2008/09, primary enrolment had risen to 15.5 million - an increase of over 500% (development progress). I find it very amazing how quickly the access to education improved so quickly and if it continues to grow at this rate then I believe that in the future Ethiopia could actually become a very highly developed country. Secondary school enrolments also grew more than fivefold during this period (development progress). To me this quote tells me just how fast the access to education had grown in Ethiopia in just a short period of time. I think that this is very good because Ethiopia is a country that had had been struck by deep poverty, and education could be used as a tool to climb out of it.

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Progress has been enabled through a sustained government-led effort to reduce poverty and expand the public education system equitably (Green). I think that the government's idea of how to get rid of this huge is actually working, and if the government keeps this up then then Ethiopia may be able to rise up to its former glory. This has been backed by substantial increases in national education expenditure and aid to the sector, as well as improved planning and implementation capacity at all levels (Green). Benefiting from sustained growth, the Ethiopian government, in partnership with donors, has invested heavily in improving access to education (one). I think that the government is doing a good job investing a lot of money one education but I think that they should give education number one priority and invest most of their money on making education accessible instead of building roads and building, because I think that once every one in Ethiopia has access to education then things like buildings and roads will follow, bbecuse education is the key to development so where ever there is education development will follow. Their Key measures have included abolishing school fees, increasing expenditure on school construction and maintenance and hiring and training thousands of new teachers, administrators and officials (one). I think that the abolishment of school fees was a good idea because since Ethiopia is an extremely poor country not everyone can afford it. This has been complemented by a shift to mother tongue instruction and by the gradual decentralization of the education system to progressively lower administrative levels (one). This has likely contributed to improved service delivery (one). I think that it is good that Ethiopia's government is concentrating so hard to improve access to education in Ethiopia, because I think that this will greatly help the growth and economy of Ethiopia.

This table shows how much exactly the access of education in Ethiopia has improved:

Year

Primary 1st cycle (1-$)

Primary

2nd cycle (5-8)

Both cycles (1-8)

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

1194/95

34.0

1199/01

88.6

61.0

75.0

31.9

19.3

25.7

60.9

40.7

51.0

2000/01

95.3

70.2

83.0

33.9

22.9

30.8

67.3

47.0

57.4

2001/02

96.2

73.3

84.9

45.4

27.4

36.5

71.7

51.2

61.6

2002/03

94.6

73.5

84.2

52.5

31.9

42.4

74.6

53.8

64.4

2003/04

95.2

78.3

86.9

57.0

36.9

47.1

77.4

59.1

68.4

I think that these numbers on the graph are actually pretty good and the Ethiopian government should keep struggling to make the numbers rise or at least to keep them the same as they are right now.

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Access to education has not only improved in Addis Ababa but in all parts in Ethiopia. This table shows how much access to education has improved in some individual parts of Ethiopia.

Gross enrollment ratio (GER)

Net Enrolment Ratio (NEF)

Male

Female

Total

Addis Ababa

142.6

90.3

97.6

94.0

Gambella

106.6

89.6

54.2

75.2

Harar

100.5

91.7

72.9

82.5

Ben-Gumuz

100.5

86.3

65.2

76.0

Dire Dawa

83.2

67.6

52.8

60.4

Tigray

80.6

63.6

68.7

66.1

SNNPR

74.2

74.2

52.6

63.5

Oromia

72.7

70.7

52.4

61.6

Amhara

61.8

54.6

53.1

53.9

Somalia

15.1

14.8

7.8

11.6

Afar

14.8

12.6

9.0

11.0

National

68.4

62.9

51.8

57.4

The only thing that I think is wrong about these tables is the huge gender imbalance, the government should work hard to fix that because Ethiopia will only develop further is if both boys and girls agree and work through it together.

Ethiopia has seen unprecedented expansion of its education system (one). In 1992, around four of five primary school-age children were out of school (one).(I think that this shows not only does the government care about education but so do some of the children's parents, this is good because the parents would encourage their children to take their education seriously therefore causing a better future for Ethiopia). This is good because in 1999, this figure stood at over 60% (one). Now, it is only one in five (one). This is a huge increase of numbers. Education outcomes have improved rapidly in all regions, although the two predominantly pastoral regions, Afar and Somali, remain far behind the rest of the country, with net enrolment ratios of 24.4% 31.6%, respectively (one). I think that maybe the Ethiopian government should focus more on these regions because they are in a desperate need of help.

Improvements in access to education have helped narrow the gender gap and have benefited the poorest (one). Traditionally, boys were more likely to attend school and less likely to drop out: in 1994/95, boys' gross enrolment ratio (GER) was more than 50% higher than girls' (31.7% and 20.4%, respectively) (one). Since then, a number of initiatives have been implemented: encouraging women's employment in the civil service, promoting gender-sensitive teaching methods and increasing the minimum marriage age to 18 (one). In 2008/09, almost full gender parity was achieved: the GER was 90.7% for girls and 96.7% for boys (one). Moreover, the rate of education poverty is declining at a faster rate for the poorest quintiles (one). I think that this is good because like I said before both boys and girls have to work together in order to help Ethiopia grow.

Low levels of education quality remain one of the most significant challenges in improving learning outcomes (one). Even so, compared with other countries in sub-Saharan Africa that have abolished school fees and experienced rapid increases in enrolment, Ethiopia has been more successful at rapidly hiring and deploying additional teachers (one). Considering the number of students entering the system, many of whom come from disadvantaged backgrounds, the decline in quality would likely have been significantly worse had it not been for strong demand- and supply-side efforts by donors and the government (one).

Progress in education in Ethiopia has coincided with substantial reductions in poverty and improvements in food security, health and nutrition (one). Most notably, the Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP), the government's flagship social protection and food security program, has provided assistance to more than 7 million people since 2005.5 the percentage of children classified as stunted and underweight - although still disconcertingly high - has declined in recent years. However, there are still substantial inequalities limiting access to education, with almost 40% of the bottom quintile expected never to enroll in school (one). I think that it is going to be hard job trying to improve the quality of the education, but making education accessible to everyone is a good start, I think the Ethiopian government should ask for help from developed countries, and try to get an interest free loan from them that they could pay back in the future without struggling too much.

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But then there is also a huge shortage of teaches and other human resources. This table explains and demonstrates the problem very clearly.

Regions

First cycle primary

school(1-4)

Second cycle

primary (5-8)

General Secondary

(9-10)

Addis Ababa

96.9

85.6

80.2

Gambella

90.8

53.6

27.3

Harari

83.7

34.6

63.7

Ben gumuze

99.5

68.5

25.3

Dire dawa

91.8

60.7

56.6

Tigray

93.2

50.5

20.9

SNNPR

99.4

29.7

32.6

Oromia

96.5

20.2

26.5

Amhara

97.0

35.6

38.9

Somalia

91.8

3.5

33.1

Afar

83.6

52.6

52.8

National

96.5

32.1

44.5

Reaching the millions of remaining out-of-school Ethiopian children will require a targeted approach to reach marginalized groups, including through continued emphasis on bringing schools closer to children, as well as social protection programs to reduce food insecurity and child labor demands, and a focus on child and maternal health and early childhood education to ensure that children are ready for school (one). I think that this is good because if children aren't fed well then they can't concentrate.

Ensuring that the expansion of secondary school keeps pace with primary will become increasingly important. Many parents may see the prospect of secondary education as a requirement for putting children through primary (one). I think that this is good because like I said before the parents can encourage their children to go through school and like I said before this will help the growth of Ethiopia greatly.

In conclusion I think that the accessibility to education in Ethiopia is going towards the right tracks and should keep up the good work, only then can Ethiopia become a developed country.