21st Century Skills Myth And Lore We Share Education Essay

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Description: This project examines common themes and archetypes found in folklore and myth, as one way to illustrate cross-cultural similarities and promote global awareness. The example project demonstrates how students might conduct a research project that explores common themes found in folk stories or mythologies that originate in different parts of the world and at different points in history. The tutorials provide instruction for using a word processing program to record and organize information that is gathered, including how to properly cite sources using the MLA Citation Style. The final project report will be prepared in a presentation program for sharing with the class or others outside the classroom. Discussion questions, assessment rubrics, and information about adapting and extending the example project are included in the resource materials available for download with this project.

Notes to the Teacher

The core subjects addressed in the example project are language arts and social studies, specifically how the "Hero Cycle" archetypes reappear in mythological stories collected from different cultures around the world, as well as different periods in history. Students can be encouraged to make connections between the folk stories and myths they are familiar with and stories that are common in other countries or other periods of time, when choosing their own topic to explore. By identifying the main elements of story and myth, and discovering that these can be found in stories, no matter when or where they originated, the student is introduced to the idea that there are cross-cultural similarities that transcend time and place. This can encourage interest in, and exploration of, other cultures, which in turn promotes global awareness.

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Please note that you will gain the most benefit by reviewing the basic project, as it is demonstrated in the tutorials, and then adapting the activity to take advantage of the unique combination of physical resources (hardware, software, Internet access), time availability, and student skill levels that you will be working with in your own classroom.

The example project can be implemented, exactly as demonstrated in the tutorials, to give students the opportunity to acquire technology skills through the use of digital tools. However, the basic project will more fully support the teaching and learning of other 21st century concepts and skills beyond those related to technology, if students are encouraged to come up with their own way of demonstrating and sharing knowledge through the use of these tools. Perhaps they would illustrate a different topic or concept, or use a different multimedia application ... the possibilities are varied and limited only by the students' imaginations!

Refer to the "Adapting & Extending" tutorials, and to the guidelines provided in the Professional Development Workbook (also included in this Project Resource Packet) for more information about modifying the basic project for use in your own classroom.

Goals & Objectives

The goal of this project is to involve students in a creative exercise that also promotes the use of research/information literacy and critical thinking skills. Students will be encouraged to follow their own interests in choosing a folk story or myth to research and report on. In doing so, they will need to demonstrate the ability to plan their research strategy, locate, organize, and evaluate information they find, as well as produce a final presentation.

Students will demonstrate their achievement of project objectives by:

Locating & selecting a folk tale theme or myth that they would like to explore. (Research & Information Fluency, Critical Thinking & Problem Solving)

Identifying a minimum of 5 sources of information relevant to their topic. (Research & Information Fluency, Critical Thinking & Problem Solving)

Identifying a minimum of 2 multimedia resources - images, audio & video file - that are relevant to the chosen topic. (Research & Information Fluency, Critical Thinking & Problem Solving)

Accurately & effectively completing the steps necessary for creating an outline in the word-processing document. (Technology Literacy)

Accurately & effectively completing the steps necessary for creating a slide presentation. (Creativity & Innovation, Technology Literacy)

Accurately citing sources used for their work. (Digital Citizenship)

Sharing their presentation with others. (Communication & Collaboration)

Evaluating their own work, in response to comments received, and revising their work, as necessary. (Critical Thinking & Problem Solving, Technology Literacy)

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Preparation, Materials Needed & Skill Mastery

Before beginning this project, check the availability of the Web resources suggested in the tutorials and project materials. If Web sites or access to online applications are being blocked by an Internet filter, you may wish to request help from your technical support staff in order to open up access to these resources for yourself and your students. Atomic Learning cannot guarantee that the referenced Web resources will comply with your school or organization's policies for appropriate student use of the Internet.

Materials needed for completing the example project:

Computer w/Internet Access (individual or small group)

Word processing and presentation software installed or available as an online application

Access to the student materials in the Project Resource Packet

Printer, scanner, digital cameras (optional)

Students should have mastered basic computer skills, such as the use of input devices (mouse, keyboard, etc.) to select and enter data, how to open and close applications, and how to save documents to a personal folder or directory.

21st Century Concepts & Skills Addressed by this Project

Concepts & Skills Related to Teaching

The example project provides opportunities for teachers to demonstrate their understanding of 21st century concepts and demonstrate 21st century skills in a variety of different ways.

Bringing Creativity & Innovation into the 21st Century Classroom by:

Inspiring students to take a creative approach to report research results.

Applying digital tools in creative ways toward increased understanding of core subject matter.

Inviting students to reflect on their own conceptual understanding of the topic under study.

Providing students with opportunities to collaborate with others who might have a different perspective or use a different medium to convey meaning.

Designing & Developing Authentic Learning Experiences & Assessments by:

Incorporating the use of digital tools as a way to engage students in the creative process.

Encouraging students to pursue topics that interest them and that are relevant to their own personal experience.

Tailoring the project process to meet the needs of individual students.

Encouraging students to reflect on their own work and revise it, as needed.

Providing multiple and varied methods of assessment.

Modeling the Effective Use of Digital-Age Tools by:

Demonstrating a familiarity with the software application and its capabilities.

Involving students in determining how they will gather, organize, and report the information they find through their research.

Demonstrating how ideas can be effectively communicated, both visually and textually, through the presentation slideshow format.

Modeling Digital Citizenship and Responsibility by:

Demonstrating how to identify relevant, credible resources.

Modeling the appropriate use of information and media that has been found on the Web.

Properly citing sources for information used in a research report.

Contributing to Personal and Professional Growth and Leadership by:

Providing a starting point for a professional development activity that promotes evaluation of current teaching practices.

Encouraging continued development of technology skills and the integration of digital-age tools and activities in the classroom.

Concepts and Skills Related to Learning:

The example project provides students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate 21st century concepts and skills in a variety of ways. How a teacher implements this project in their classroom will play a significant role in what students are able to take away from the experience. The following information suggests how the example project could be used to address important 21st century concepts and skills.

Creativity & Innovation:

Students are encouraged to create a multi-slide presentation, incorporating a variety of media and text.

Students are responsible for creating or finding and evaluating media (images, video, audio) that support the main idea depicted in their presentation.

Communication & Collaboration:

Students explore effective ways to convey information with minimal text and images in a slideshow presentation.

Students are given the opportunity to reflect on the effectiveness of their presentations and revise their work, if necessary, based on the comments they receive from others about their work.

Students are given the opportunity to collaborate on the project and/or share project information with other members of the class, members of their own family, and/or others who are not in close physical proximity.

Research & Information Fluency:

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Students are asked to identify and research a topic of interest, related to common themes in folklore and myth

Students are responsible for locating, organizing, and evaluating the resources they find

Students will present the information they find, using a multimedia format, such as a slide presentation.

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving:

Students must evaluate the resources they find online and choose those that are relevant to the topic they have chosen to study.

Students are encouraged to develop strategies for completing all parts of the project within a specified timeframe.

Students are asked to evaluate the works of others and offer both positive feedback and constructive criticism.

Technology Literacy:

Students demonstrate the ability to complete steps necessary to gather information online and create a slideshow presentation, using available software tools.

Students are supported in finding solutions to technical problems they may encounter when working on project tasks.

Students are given the opportunity to reflect on how the skills learned while completing this project might be applied to other projects, both in and out of the classroom.

Growth & Leadership:

Students are given the opportunity to explore related areas of interest and demonstrate an understanding of how their own growth and leadership abilities are related to taking personal responsibility for life-long learning.

Assessment Rubrics

21st Century Skills Assessment Rubric:

The following rubric can be used to assess the level at which students demonstrate 21st century skills while completing this project. Some modification to the basic project may be necessary, in order to provide a transformative experience for students. Examples for adapting or extending the example project are demonstrated in the "Adapting & Extending" tutorials. Guidelines for modifying the example project are included in the Professional Development Workbook.

21st Century Concept

Beginning

(1)

Developing

(2)

Proficient

(3)

Transformative

(4)

Row Score

Creativity & Innovation

Students complete the project as demonstrated, using the provided media and reproducing the example product.

Students complete the project as demonstrated, using the provided media and including additional information on their project pages.

Students complete the project; using information and media they have gathered and/or created themselves, following the same structure as the example project.

Students complete the project; using information and media they have gathered and/or created themselves, and expanding the final project beyond what was discussed in the basic example.

Communication & Collaboration

Students create individual slide presentations. They do not interact with the works created by others.

Students create their own individual slide presentations. They contribute comments about the works of others, but only to the extent required for successful project completion.

Students create their own individual slide presentations. They contribute multiple comments about the works of others, beyond what is required for successful project completion.

Students create their own individual presentations. They contribute extensive and constructive comments about the works of others, beyond what is required for successful project completion. They invite others to collaborate on this or similar projects.

Research & Information Fluency

Students follow the guidelines given in the tutorials to locate and view the Web resources suggested in the project materials. They are able to add example information to their word processing document.

Students follow the guidelines given in the tutorials to locate and view the Web resources suggested in the project materials. They are able to independently identify at least one additional source of information that is relevant to the topic.

Students are able to initiate their own Web search to find information about the topic under study. They are able to independently evaluate whether a Web site has valid, useful information to contribute to their project, and they are able to extract the information they need from the source.

Students are able to gather, evaluate, and use information they find on the Web, as well as from other sources. They are able to integrate information they find into their project documents and present the results in a meaningful way to others, using a variety of different digital media and software tools.

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

Students are able to identify the steps they need to take in order to complete the example project. They are able to identify the questions they will be trying to answer by completing the project. They are involved in guided discussions about the project.

Students demonstrate an understanding of the essential question under investigation in the example project and they are able to pose additional related questions of their own that they would like to explore. They actively take part in guided discussions about the project.

Students are able to identify the essential question under investigation and pose relevant questions of their own. They are able to make informed decisions in order to effectively plan and implement strategies for finding possible solutions. They actively take part in guided discussions about the project and demonstrate the ability to also engage others.

Students are able to identify essential questions and problems for investigation, as well as demonstrate leadership in suggesting alternative ways to find, evaluate, and report possible solutions. They will actively engage others in discussions about the issues under investigation, both in and outside of the classroom. They demonstrate a willingness to listen to and explore different perspectives.

Digital Citizenship

Students are able to identify the source of the data that is used for their project. With some help, students are able to identify "appropriate" and "inappropriate" examples of content.

Students are able to identify and correctly cite the source of the data they use for their project. They are able to demonstrate the ability to follow up on investigating topics they are personally interested in. Students are able to identify "appropriate" and "inappropriate" examples of content.

Students are able to express why it is important to accurately reference the source of the data they use for their project. They are able to make use of a variety of resources to further their own knowledge about a specific topic. Students are able to independently generate "appropriate" and "inappropriate" examples of content for discussion.

Students are able to accurately cite and ethically use information gathered from Web resources. They are able to express how the use of digital tools can further their own learning, as well as support collaboration with others. Students are able to independently manage "appropriate" and "inappropriate" content.

Technology Literacy

Students are able to complete the example project in the demonstrated application with some guidance from others.

Students are able to independently complete the example project in the demonstrated application, as well as indicate an understanding of why the chosen application is appropriate for the project. With some guidance, they are able to troubleshoot any problems they encounter.

Students are able to independently complete the example project in the demonstrated application, as well as independently solve any problems they encounter. Students are able to select and use tools available in the application effectively and appropriately.

Students are able to demonstrate the ability to complete the example project in the chosen application. They are able to easily transfer knowledge to using other applications that are equally effective and appropriate tools for this project. They are able to independently solve any problems they encounter and help others do the same.

Growth & Leadership

Students require help to identify and pursue related areas of interest. They require help designing their own projects. They are reluctant to assume leadership roles.

Students are able to identify and pursue related areas of interest with some guidance from the teacher. They are able to identify elements of project design, but require help putting it all together. They will assume leadership roles that have been clearly defined.

Students are able to identify and pursue related areas of interest, as well as begin designing their own projects that utilize the same skills they have learned by completing other, similar learning activities. They are able to assume leadership roles.

Students will pursue related areas of interest independently, and design projects of their own that demonstrate learned skills, as well as design projects that require the acquisition of new skills. They will seek out ways to demonstrate leadership in a variety of different situations.

Total Score:

Technology Skills Assessment Rubric:

The following rubric can be used to assess student mastery of the technology skills taught in the tutorials. The rubric can be used by the teacher for assessing student work or by the student as a self-assessment tool, after completing the example project.

Objective or Task:

Poor

Is unable to complete this task without guidance

Fair

Is able to complete this task with some guidance

Good

Is able to complete this task without any guidance

Excellent

Is able to complete this task without any guidance and can apply the same process to other projects without help

Row Score:

Locate & select a folklore theme or myth for investigation

1

2

3

4

Identify 5 or more sources of information relevant to the topic under investigation

1

2

3

4

Identify 2 or more multimedia resources

1

2

3

4

Accurately complete the steps necessary to create a word processing document

1

2

3

4

Accurately complete the steps necessary to create a slideshow presentation

1

2

3

4

Accurately cite sources using the MLA style

1

2

3

4

Share the slide presentation with others

1

2

3

4

Evaluate the effectiveness of the presentation and revise, as necessary

1

2

3

4

Total Score:

Questions for Student Discussion:

(Questions & sample answers/discussion points are included in this document. A separate student handout, found with the Student Materials, contains just the questions.)

The following questions can be used to generate small group or class discussion about common themes found in mythology and legend, research methods and critical thinking, and digital citizenship. These questions can be raised at any point during the completion of the project. Suggestions for how to guide the discussion are given in parentheses following the question. A handout containing just the questions is available with the Student Materials provided in the Project Resource Packet.

How would you define a "myth?" How is it different from a legend?

(In common use, myth and legend are often used synonymously, so don't be surprised if students are confused by the overlapping elements of these story types. Generally, a "myth" is set outside of time, with no real attempt to place it within known history. There is also often no opinion given as to whether the myth is true or false. Myths carry their message through the use of symbolism and allegory. A legend, on the other hand, is often placed in the cultural chronology, as having occurred at a specific point in time, and the story may be told as though it were an historical fact.

Why do you think there are common themes found in myths and legends that originate in different countries or during different periods of history?

(The intent of this question is to raise awareness about common human experiences and the human need to find meaning in life, which might be explained symbolically in the culture's mythology.)

Besides the Star Wars movies, can you think of other current movies, plays, television shows, or other stories told through the media that are examples of modern day myth?

(Be prepared to have some examples from the current movies or television shows that your students might be exposed to.)

Is it always easy to immediately recognize the hero or heroine in a story? Why might a storyteller give the hero or heroine physical characteristics that don't necessarily fit with our stereotypical image of a hero or heroine? How might this device be used to make the story more appealing to a wider audience?

(Explore the idea of hero/heroine traits that each individual might have, but that aren't immediately recognized as such. By allowing for the potential that anyone could be a hero/heroine, no matter what their physical or mental capabilities, the storyteller can engage a larger audience, as individuals can more easily identify with the hero/heroine in the story.)

Carl Jung developed a school of psychology that stressed the importance of dreams, fantasy, and myth in understanding the human psyche. Why do you think he felt these things had something to tell us about ourselves?

(Jung was very interested in the way that people strive to find meaning in their lives. His school of thought diverged from Freud in that he identified two layers of the unconscious, as opposed to the one layer that Freud talks about. The "collective unconscious," which lies below the "personal unconscious," contains experienced shared by all humanity and accounts for the common symbolism found in dreams, fantasy, and myth. This question could lead to further exploration of the analytical nature of Jungian psychology and the break that Jung had from Freudian psychology.)

Identify and summarize 3 stories that each come from a different country, that are examples of the Monomyth, as described by Joseph Campbell.

(Many of the Web sites listed in the "Sources for Project Information and Further Exploration" section of this document provide examples of the Hero Cycle/Monomyth format in cross-cultural mythology.)

Using the steps outlined for the Hero Cycle, can you think of an experience you have had in your own life, where you have been the reluctant hero? What was the "call to adventure" and how did the story play out?

(Allow students a short amount of time to formulate their answer to this question. It could evolve into a longer writing assignment, if you ask them to actually write up their own personal myth, using the Hero Cycle archetypes.)

It is considered good research practice to verify information by having at least two "primary" sources that agree about what you are reporting. Why is this especially important when you are gathering information from Web sites?

(Anyone can create a Web site and publish whatever they want. There may not be an objective body checking to be sure that the information posted on a site is true or accurate. Knowing who published the information, how the site is maintained, and where they get their information can help determine if a site contains valid information for a research report. Depending on the topic, "primary" or original sources of information may be difficult to find.)

The MLA guidelines for citing online resources specify certain pieces of information be provided in a specific order and formatted a specific way. Why might your teacher, an educational institution, or a research journal want you to follow formatting guidelines for citing your sources?

(The example project uses MLA style guidelines for publishing the Works Cited information, but this could just as easily be APA, or Chicago/Turbian, so the specific guidelines that you may have your students following for their own Works Cited information is not as important as recognizing that if the reader knows that the publication follows a specific set of rules for formatting, then they will be able to quickly identify the information they need to find the source material themselves.)

Discuss the pros and cons of using Wikipedia articles as sources of information. When might it be appropriate to do so? What benefits are gained by having a tool like Wikipedia available?

(You may have your own opinion about the benefit, or lack thereof, in using Wikipedia as a research tool. It may also be the case that your school or organization may have specific policies about the use of information gathered from a Wikipedia article or similar source. Encourage students to express their own opinions and experiences with Wikipedia and other Web resources that may not be considered entirely credible. Extended treatment of this topic may lead to discussions about censoring material that is allowed on Web sites and the implications that censoring might have on the ability for everyone to freely share and collaborate.)

Project Resource Packet:

The following items are included in the Project Resource Packet that you have downloaded for this project.

Project Activity Guide (this document)

Example Project Files

Example word processing document

Example presentation document

Online citation builder export document

Student Materials

Images or other resources used in the example project

Student Discussion Question Handout

Professional Development Workbook

Certificates of Completion

For the Teacher (after adapting & implementing the project)

For the Student (after completing the classroom project)

Sources for Project Content and Further Exploration:

Ashliman, D. L. "Folktexts: A library of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology, page 1." University of Pittsburgh. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 June 2009. <http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html>.

Creative Commons. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 June 2009. <http://creativecommons.org/>.

Davis, Bryan M. "The Hero Archetype in Literature, Religion, Movies, and Popular Culture: A Graduate Project." Hero Archetypes. Stephen F Austin University, 11 Oct. 1997. Web. 9 June 2009. <http://www.tatsbox.com/hero>.

EasyBib: Free Bibliography Maker - MLA, APA, Chicago citation styles. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 June 2009. <http://www.easybib.com/>. Online tool for formatting bibliographies.

"Folklore -." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 June 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folklore>.

Graydanus, Steven D. "Star Wars: An American Mythology." Decent Films Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 June 2009. <http://www.decentfilms.com/sections/articles/2535>.

"Internet Archive: Free Downloads: Audio Archive." N.p., n.d. Web. 5 June 2009. <http://www.archive.org/details/audio>.

The Internet Classics Archive: 441 searchable works of classical literature. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 June 2009. <http://classics.mit.edu/>.

Jenks, Kathleen. "Mythology's Mythinglinks: COMMON THEMES / Animal Guides." Myth*ing Links. N.p., 17 May 2009. Web. 29 May 2009. <http://www.mythinglinks.org/ct~animals.html>.

Joseph Campbell Foundation. N.p., 2008. Web. 9 June 2009. <http://www.jcf.org>.

"Monomyth Website, ORIAS, UC Berkeley." ORIAS Home Page. University of California - Berkeley, n.d. Web. 10 June 2009. <http://orias.berkeley.edu/hero/>.

"Mythic Resources ~ Myth, Carl Jung, Joseph Campbell and Archetypal Psychology." The Center for Story and Symbol, Joseph Campbell and Archetypal Psychology. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 June 2009. <http://www.folkstory.com/resources.html>.

"The Nottinghamshire Heritage Gateway Themes Folklore and Customs Overview." The Nottinghamshire Heritage Gateway Homepage. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 May 2009. <http://www.nottsheritagegateway.org.uk/themes/folklore.htm>.

PD Photo - Free Photos and Pictures (public domain, stock pictures, wallpaper, royalty free, clip art, etc.). N.p., n.d. Web. 15 June 2009. <http://www.pdphoto.org/index.php>. All images in the public domain.

Persall, Steve. "Mythology in Star Wars." The Center for Story and Symbol, Joseph Campbell and Archetypal Psychology. St Petersburg Times, 1999. Web. 11 June 2009. <http://www.folkstory.com/articles/petersburg.html>.

Reusable Art. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 June 2009. <http://www.reusableart.com/>. Copyright free images.

Roberts, Forrester. "King Arthur." Charts and Maps by Forrester Roberts. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 June 2009. <http://www.forrester-roberts.co.uk/arthur.html>.

"Tale type and motif indices: maps." The Tower of Babel. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 June 2009. <http://starling.rinet.ru/kozmin/tales/>.

Tormod, Kinnes. "AT Types of Folktales - The Gold Scales." THE GOLD SCALES of Art, Wisdom, Extracts, Folktales, and Lore. N.p., 2009. Web. 9 June 2009.

<http://oaks.nvg.org/folktale-types.html>.

"UC Copyright." University of California Systemwide Home. N.p., 3 May 2003. Web. 5 June 2009. <http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/copyright/publicdomain.html>.

"Welcome to the OWL at Purdue - The OWL at Purdue." Welcome to the Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL). N.p., n.d. Web. 5 June 2009. <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/>.

"World Folktales." ESL Station. N.p., n.d., Web. 20 June 2009. <http://www.eslstation.net/theREALWF/Index.htm>.

Correlations with the P21 Framework* & ISTE® NETS**:

The following statements provide information about how the example project might address 21st century concepts and skills as described in the P21 Framework (defined by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills) and ISTE National Educational Technology Standards and Performance Indicators for Teachers and Students. ***

It is important to note that how the project is actually implemented in the classroom will have a huge impact on the 21st century concepts and skills a student is exposed to and has a chance to practice and master. Additional steps can be taken to strengthen the correlations to the P21 Framework and ISTE NETS components. Refer to the Professional Development Workbook to find guidelines for adapting and extending this project.

A detailed description of the P21 Framework can be found at http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/

Information about NETS•T and NETS•S can be found at http://www.iste.org/

P21 Themes addressed by this Project:

Global Awareness

Financial, Economic, Business & Entrepreneurial Literacy

Civic Literacy

Health Literacy

X

P21 Core Subjects:

Language Arts

P21 Skills:

Learning & Innovation Skills; Information, Media, & Technology Skills

ISTE NETS•T addressed by this Project:

1. Facilitate & Inspire Student Learning & Creativity

2. Design & Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences & Assessments

3. Model Digital-Age Work & Learning

4. Promote & Model Digital Citizenship & Responsibility

5. Engage in Professional Growth & Leadership

X

X

X

X

NETS•T 1 (Facilitate Learning & Creativity):

Identify and define authentic questions and problems

Invite students to reflect on their own understanding of the problem they are trying to solve; invite learners to share their ideas

Model behavior & thought processes through a variety of activities (using online tools, extended collaboration with other schools/classrooms, etc.)

NETS•T 2 (Design, Develop & Evaluate Authentic Experiences & Assessments):

Guide students through the process of choosing a topic to explore, finding information, creating a presentation, sharing their work, and reflecting on the process

Provide an experience that develops skills students can apply to other problems/situations

Personalize the learning experience to meet the individual needs of the student

Encourage students to use multiple methods for assessing their work, so that they can gain the skills they need to inform their own learning processes

NETS•T 3 (Model Digital Age Work & Learning):

Become more familiar with productivity software and online tools, in order to model the effective use of these digital tools as a method for exploring and solving real-world problems

Employ both local and Internet digital environments and solutions to build cross-cultural, collaborative projects that are not dependent on physical proximity

Model & evaluate the use of a variety of digital tools as a method of communicating with a wider audience

Model & facilitate the use of a variety of digital tools for locating, analyzing, evaluating, and using information resources to support the issues and problems being addressed

NETS•T 4 (Promote & Model Digital Citizenship & Responsibility):

Demonstrate & support the appropriate & legal use of media found on the Web

Demonstrate the process for accurately citing sources of online information, using MLA style

Promote an understanding of "appropriate" versus "inappropriate" behavior during online collaboration

NETS•S addressed by this Project:

1. Creativity & Innovation

2. Communication & Collaboration

3. Research & Information Fluency

4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, & Decision Making

5. Digital Citizenship

6. Technology Operations & Concepts

X

X

X

X

X

X

NETS•S 1 (Creativity & Innovation):

Identify symbolic references and apply to creative storytelling

Modify the format, layout, and other elements of a slideshow presentation

NETS•S 2 (Communication & Collaboration):

Explore effective ways to use multimedia in a slideshow presentation

Contribute information gained through individual research to the team effort, if collaborating with others on this project

NETS•S 3 (Research & Information Fluency):

Identify what needs to be done to complete the project

Identify valid information sources that could be used to complete the project

Evaluate & select the information sources & tools that would be best to use

Demonstrate the ability to present information effectively, using the selected tools

NETS•S 4 (Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, & Decision Making):

Identify the significant topics to investigate or concepts to illustrate

Develop a plan for completing all parts of the project

Collect & analyze information that is available from the selected information sources

Identify alternative sources of information that might present information in a different way from those encountered previously

NETS•S 5 (Digital Citizenship):

Demonstrate appropriate and legal use of online resources

Accurately cite sources of information and other resources used in the presentation

NETS•S 6 (Technology Operations & Concepts):

Demonstrate the ability to use an online communication & collaboration tool

Demonstrate an understanding of why the selected application is, or is not, an appropriate tool for this project

*Atomic Learning is a professional development affiliate of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, which supports the integration of 21st century skills into all aspects of teaching and learning. The Partnership for 21st Century Skills is the leading advocacy organization focused on infusing 21st century skills into education. The organization brings together the business community, education leaders, and policy makers to define a powerful vision for 21st century education to ensure every child's success as citizens and workers in the 21st century by providing tools and resources to help facilitate and drive change.

**National Educational Technology Standards for Students, Second Edition, © 2007, ISTE® (International Society for Technology in Education), www.iste.org. All rights reserved. National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers, Second Edition © 2008 ISTE ® (International Society for Technology in Education) www.iste.org. All rights reserved.

***Atomic Learning, Inc. has relied on work done by a number of organizations, including the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), The Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21), the American Association of School Libraries (AASL), United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Teaching and Learning Scotland, and England's Department of Children, Schools, and Families. None of these organizations has endorsed or assisted in the creation of this product or any of the included materials.