The St Johns County Experiences And Crimes Criminology Essay

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St. Johns County is located in North-East Florida and is bordered on the east by the Atlantic Ocean. The county is situated in between Jacksonville and Daytona, and is among the fastest growing counties in the state. The 2008 population estimate for St Johns County (US Census Bureau) indicated a 46.9 % increase from April 2000 to July 1, 2008. Currently, there are approximately 181,540 residents. St. Johns County is the home of St. Augustine, the nation's oldest city, which receives in excess of 6.5 million tourists per year. It is also home of the World Golf Village, PGA Hall of Fame, and the Tournament Player's Championship at Sawgrass. St. Johns County is also a popular tourist stop for those traveling to the Daytona 500, Pepsi 400, and "Bike Week" in Daytona, as well as those on their way to the various attractions in the Orlando area.

The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office (SJSO) is an internationally (CALEA) and state (CFA) accredited law enforcement agency. The St Johns County Sheriff's Office is considered a "large" agency, employing 592 men and women, with 280 certified law enforcement officers and 111 sworn detention employees. The agencies' 2010 budget is $56,036,841. The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office provides a full range of law enforcement services, detention, and 9-1-1 dispatch services. The agency is also responsible for maintaining the security of the St. Johns County Courts; as well as serving all criminal warrants and civil process orders issued by the courts.

Section B: Problem Identification and Purpose

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The St. Johns County experiences a high volume of non-violent crimes. Typically there is very little consideration to have evidence analyzed for the presence of DNA in these less serious crimes. Unfortunately, burglaries and property related crimes tend to fall in a category of less serious crimes. However, studies show that individuals who commit property crimes have higher recidivism rates and demonstrate the potential to engage in more serious crime, even violent crimes (Murphy 2006).

Additionally, burglars pose a significant threat, not just to those whose property they steal, but to the community at large. Burglars also demonstrate the propensity to commit more serious, and violent crime is perhaps the greatest danger posed by property crime offenders. The tendency for burglars to engage in violent behavior makes it not only necessary, but critical to analyze DNA evidence from these crime scenes. Additionally, the lack of witnesses and/or viable leads produces low clearance rates, which results in the significant loss of property and offenders not being identified and/or held accountable (Murphy 2006).

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) Crime Laboratory is the primary provider of DNA analysis for the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office. Unfortunately, the FDLE is forced to back log DNA analyses in most cases, due to the overwhelming need to analyze evidence in major cases. In turn, this impacts the priority of evidence analysis as it relates to non-violent crimes, resulting in prolonged examination/results and the need to limit the number of submissions in each case.

With these issues in mind, the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office intends to partner with DNA: SI LABS to develop a local database of forensic DNA evidence collected from various crime scenes. This database, also known as LODIS (Local DNA Index System), is designed specifically to provide local agencies with a system to create local DNA databases, which are flexible to meet the unique investigative needs of local law enforcement agencies.

The mass collection of DNA from common crimes and known subject samples, placed into a database, will be developed into an effective investigative tool. For eighteen months, every patrol deputy, crime scene technician, and detective will be encouraged to submit any number of swabs, collected from any type of crime scene. Additionally, deputies will obtain known subject reference samples (collected within Florida Law and St. Johns County Sheriff's Office Policies and Procedures) to be submitted for inclusion into the LODIS database.

The overall goal of this program is to improve the quality of life for the citizen's of St. Johns County, by reducing the number of repeat criminals committing additional crimes. Victims of crime suffer immeasurable psychological impact from acts of the criminal offenders. Although many of these crimes may seem trivial, the economic loss the victims experience is significant. The long term result translates to a positive economic and psychological impact to the citizens of St. Johns County.

Section C: Program Goals, Objectives, and Expected Outcomes

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The goals of the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office, through this initiative:

Establish policies and procedures to ensure legal and ethical implementation of the LODIS program

Train all law enforcement officers from the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office , the St Augustine Police Department, and the St. Augustine Beach Police Department to properly collect and submit biological evidence for inclusion to the LODIS program

Implement a program (LODIS) in which DNA collection and analysis is accessible for non-violent crimes

Create and populate Local Combined DNA Index System with known offenders and scene collection samples

The objectives of the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office, through this initiative:

Realize and increase LODIS hits to link offenders to specific unsolved crimes

Indentify, arrest and prosecute offenders identified as a result of LODIS hits

Increase common crime solvability rates by 20%

Recover stolen property and reduce the monetary impact/loss sustained as a result of property and less serious crimes

Section D: Review of Relevant Literature

A review of articles and literature connected with DNA technology and its use within law enforcement and the DNA database history and potential has yielded many interesting facts. DNA testing is a powerful tool because of the databases that have evolved from this type of analysis. Law enforcement agencies throughout the country have been prompted to reevaluate cases for DNA evidence. The success is growing as the searchable Federal, State, and local criminal DNA databases expand (Using DNA to Solve Cold Cases 2002). It is important to note that the LODIS system utilizes the same technology and principles as the state and national databases.

CODIS (Combined DNA Index System), an electronic database of DNA profiles that can identify suspects and link offenses, is similar to the AFIS (Automated Fingerprint Identification System) database. Every State in the nation has implemented, or is in the process of implementing, a DNA index of individuals convicted of certain crimes, such as rape, murder, and child abuse, entering the convicted parties' DNA profiles into the DNA database. Just as fingerprints found at a crime scene can be run through AFIS in search of a suspect, DNA profiles from a crime scene can be entered into CODIS. Therefore, law enforcement officers have the ability to identify possible suspects and link crimes when no prior suspect existed (U.S. Department of Justice 2001).

CODIS uses two indexes: (1) the Convicted Offender Index, which contains profiles of qualifying convicted offenders, and (2) the Forensic Index, which contains unknown profiles from crime scene evidence. An important strength of CODIS is that it can solve cases that originally had no suspects. Warrants can be obtained if forensic DNA evidence profiles entered into CODIS matches someone in the offender index, which then mandates the collection of a known sample from that offender to confirm the match. If the offender's DNA is in the forensic index, the system allows investigators across jurisdictions to exchange information about their respective cases (Murphy 2006).

Over the past dozen years, the FBI-managed national database has made more than 59,659 "cold hits", or exact matches to a known person's DNA, showing its crime fighting potential. At least 38 states have laws allowing collection of DNA samples from people found guilty of misdemeanors, in some cases even for such crimes as shoplifting and fortunetelling. Twenty-eight states collect DNA samples from juvenile offenders, according to information presented in June 2006 at a Boston symposium on DNA and Civil Liberties that was organized by the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics (Weiss 2006).

The FBI continues to expand their DNA database to identify criminals through DNA analysis, but it is also used to identify unidentified bodies held by local coroners and medical examiners. In 2006, there were over 40,000 unidentified dead persons nationally, a majority having died from violent crimes. DNA from convicted criminals and some arrestees has been collected by local, state, and federal government agencies since 1990. In 2006, the FBI CODIS system had over 3 million offender profiles and 135,000 from scenes of unsolved crimes. The potential for more matches increases as more DNA samples are being added (Willing 2006).

CODIS is being used across the nation with increasing success. The expansion of the database and the growing sophistication of DNA testing have also brought about a sharp increase in matches for property crimes. The FBI DNA database has provided law enforcement with the opportunity for a greater success in stopping criminals before they go on to commit more serious crimes (Willing 2006). However, standardizing the procedure for DNA analysis by conducting inventories, screening, and profiling DNA evidence is an important factor in shortening the time involved in DNA analysis ("A Process Evaluation of the California DNA Cold Hit Program" 2003 ).

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As more State legislatures expand the categories of offenders required to submit DNA samples, DNA databases continue to grow at a steady rate. For example, William David Coffman, Crime Laboratory Analyst Supervisor-DNA Database at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Florida's database contained 74,301 samples in 2000. By 2004, that number had more than tripled to 236,491. The increasing number of samples submitted and number of requests for analysis have generated oppressive caseloads for already understaffed crime labs. In response, the labs have had to relegate the analysis of DNA evidence from property offenses-if such evidence is recovered at all-to a back seat in favor of more pressing, high-profile cases. Untested DNA samples from property and other crime scenes are creating a massive backlog of untested samples (Murphy, 2006).

Three NIJ pilot projects have demonstrated that analyzing DNA from property crimes can be extraordinarily useful. Officials at the Miami-Dade County Police Department, the New York City Police Department, and the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office have had success solving high-volume property crimes (like burglary and auto theft) as well as violent crimes (such as sexual assault and murder) using funds provided by NIJ. Although the initial goal of the project was to reduce the large backlog of DNA evidence waiting to be analyzed, participants made the unexpected discovery that analyzing DNA from property crimes can have major public safety benefits (Murphy 2006).

The benefits stem from the recognition that property offenders-burglars, in particular-pose a significant threat not just to those whose property they steal, but to the community at large. Bud Stuver, who heads the DNA Testing Program at the Miami-Dade County Police Department, notes that burglary is not the "innocent crime" that some people assume it to be. For one thing, victims suffer psychological trauma not measurable in monetary terms. For another the economic losses these victims experience are significant. On top of that, burglary-despite its prevalence-has the lowest clearance rate of any index crime. But the potential that burglars will commit more serious, violent crimes is perhaps the greatest danger posed by property crime offenders. Individuals who commit property crimes have a higher recidivism rate than those who commit other types of offenses, and their demonstrated potential to engage in more serious, violent behavior makes analyzing DNA evidence from property crimes not just an option, but a matter of necessity (Murphy 2006).

Back logs with convicted offenders in State and National DNA databases, such as CODIS, prevent the identification for the clearance of other unsolved crimes. It is documented that the convicted offender backlog includes as many as 300,000 unanalyzed DNA samples from offenders convicted of crimes, with more than 500,000 samples yet to be collected. As mentioned earlier, as the number of DNA samples has grown, the ability of crime labs to analyze those samples has not kept pace. Factors that contribute to this issue include: crime labs lack sufficient numbers of trained forensic scientists and funding to hire more staff. When funds become available, there is an insufficient pool of qualified forensic scientists to hire. Additionally, crime labs lack resources and lab space necessary to obtain and use state of the art equipment and software that would speed up DNA analysis. These back logs are severely delaying the identification of offenders who remain in the community and are committing crimes (Murphy 2006).

Section E: Program Design and Methodology 

The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office will take a systematic approach as it relates to the implementation of LODIS. Sergeant David Tarbert will be assigned as the LODIS Coordinator and he will be responsible for the implementation, execution and evaluation of the LODIS program. Additionally, a LODIS Policy Committee has been created to formulate polices and procedures related to the implementation of the LODIS Program. The committee consists of agency DNA subject matter experts and members of the State Attorney's Office to ensure best practices and legal collection methods are utilized. A proposed policy draft can be found in Appendix J.

Program implementation will be divided into several phases. The initial phase of implementation will be training. DNA: SI will train deputies, investigators, and crime scene investigators on DNA collection techniques and the submission of evidence most likely to obtain information for further investigational purposes. Training on buccal swab DNA sample collection in the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office provides a good base for this training. It should be noted that LODIS training will also be provided to members of the St. Augustine Police Department and the St. Augustine Beach Police Department.

On-going evaluation of evidence collection techniques most likely to generate a positive DNA profile will be conducted by DNA: SI and St. Johns County Sheriff's Office (Sergeant David Tarbert) to evaluate the effectiveness of the training and refine existing techniques for probability of obtaining DNA profiles from various items. This information will be the basis for a triaging system for submission of evidence items based on high, medium, and low probability of obtaining a DNA profile. This insures samples most likely to yield a profile are processed first.

Collection training will include use of the LODIS specific documents; consent forms and color-coded labels for samples. Consent and labeling processes will be integrated into St. Johns County Sheriff's Office evidence and property procedures.

DNA: SI and the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office will develop a "train-the-trainer" program to allow St. Johns County Sheriff's Office to train new hires and conduct periodic refresher training. DNA: SI will train members of St. Johns County Sheriff's Office training section and information regarding the LODIS program will be incorporated into annual in-service training.

Additionally, DNA: SI will train deputies, investigators, and crime scene investigators in use of the LODIS Client Interface Auto Email Alerts software. This training will include login procedures, techniques for responding to, and utilizing standard reports, and custom searches. Management report rationale and processes will be explained. As with the collection training, DNA: SI and the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office will develop a software train-the-trainer program for new hires and ongoing and refresher training.

Software Implementation:

DNA: SI will create a customized web-based application, evidence collection system, and DNA databank for St. Johns County Sheriff's Office. This will include:

Establishing the LODIS databank with links to and from other participating LODIS datasets

Modifying LODIS software to incorporate St. Johns County Sheriff's Office specific fields

Modifying LODIS software to generate St. Johns County Sheriff's Office specific reports

Establishing secure communication

Security protocols

Establish usernames and pass codes

Enable security devices if required

St. Johns County Sheriff's Office Network - secure internet connection

Wireless for patrol cars - secure internet connections

Creating links for data upload and download

Electronic manifests and chain of custody confirmation

Reports

The next phase of the LODIS program will be sample collection which will primarily be patrol based. This approach is faster and more cost effective than requiring collection by on-call Crime Scene Technicians. Specialized evidence collection kits will allow patrol officers and/or Crime Scene Technicians to collect and submit items from known persons or from crime scene evidence for submission. Deputies, investigators, and crime scene technicians at this point will be trained to collect traditional fluid DNA (blood and saliva), contact/touch DNA, and other samples as may be appropriate to the scene.

The next phase of the LODIS program is evidence submission. Samples will be placed in color coded envelopes denoting the nature of the sample. Known samples, usually from suspects, prisoners, or victims (for elimination) bear a green label. Presumed known samples, usually surreptitiously obtained, bear a yellow label. Unknown Samples, evidence from fluid, touch, or other crime scene samples, bear a red label. These labels will be customized to suit any unique requirements. The Evidence and LODIS Coordinators will evaluate all of the LODIS related submission for the purpose of triage to ensure that the "high probability" evidence is sent to DNA: SI Labs first. If the high probability evidence fails to yield a DNA profile then the LODIS Coordinator and Evidence Coordinator will re-evaluate the case and evidence to determine whether or not subsequent submissions (medium/low probability) evidence will be sent to DNA SI: Labs for processing.

Submission will be sent in batches of no less than 75 items. These batch shipments allow efficient processing and better control. This does not preclude submission of samples for expedited processing. Once the items are submitted, computer links will provide the ability to upload submission manifests directly from case management and evidence applications. This provides advance notice to the lab of a submission shipment and a double check against the hard copy manifest. Uploaded submission data will be imported into LODIS, avoiding the possibility of transcription errors and assuring the information in LODIS records are identical to records in your system(s).

The next phase of the program is the investigation. The DNA information needed to aid an investigation will be provided automatically and quickly by LODIS. After submission, Auto Email Alerts notify all officers when LODIS identifies new hits in the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office DNA databank. These results will be ready for review in days, not months. Administrators, deputies, and investigators will receive usable DNA information while their case is fresh.

A sample Auto Alert e-mail message is shown below. The "owner" of a sample, the deputy/detective submitting it, would receive this message in less than 30 days if the submitted sample is a "hit" (match) to any record in the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office LODIS DNA Identity Databank. Owners of other samples matching this sample would be notified simultaneously. The owner, or other authorized users, would then obtain full details from your LODIS website. Information in the "Auto Alert" is intentionally limited for security reasons.

After receiving the hit message, the owner of the sample, or of any of the other matching samples, would use one of three standard online reports or run other queries they deem necessary, to gain information to assist their investigation. Administrator access allows designated managers to assign and track DNA investigations, control access, and generate custom reports. To see the standard reports, users will access their LODIS Client Interface from their desktop computers or from their automobiles connecting wirelessly to the web. All data, whether on wire or wireless connection, will be encrypted. Standard system security is username and password protection. Greater security can be enabled by using one-time password generators or other schemes/devices if you require this type of protection.

Detailed hit reports will be automatically assembled from all case-relevant leads and Hits for a given investigation by accessing your DNA databank. The specimen owner or case investigator may view all items related to an agency case; unknowns, suspects, victim eliminations, hits to offenders or evidence in different cases that are linked. A court-ready Forensic Case Report may be requested if necessary. If a Case Report is requested, a Forensic Analyst repeats the review of all data and prepares case results and conclusions in an appropriate format for court submission.

Once the Detail Hit Reports are obtained, traditional investigative techniques will be employed to gather additional evidence in an effort to strengthen the case and ensure a successful criminal prosecution.

Section F: Program Timeline

The projected time-line for the LODIS Program is 18 months. During the first six weeks of implementation, all LODIS Program participants will attend LODIS training which will be conducted at the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office Training Center. Once the LODIS Program is initiated, evidence and subject sample collection will begin and these samples will be submitted into evidence at the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office. Once the samples are submitted, 150 samples will be sent to DNA: SI Labs on a monthly basis for a period of 18 months. Program and Process data will be collected and reported monthly during the 18 month time-frame. Within this data will be the amount of evidence/scene profiles obtained, the amount of subject profiles obtained, and the number of LODIS Hits which result in offender identifications. See the program time line below:

Submit Report

Submit Report

Begin Quarterly Performance Reportt

Begin Quarterly Performance Report

Weeks 24-27 Weeks 28-31 Weeks 32-35 Weeks 36-39 Weeks 40-43 Weeks 44-47

Submit Report

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Weeks 1-4 Weeks 5-8 Weeks 9-12 Weeks 13-16 Weeks 16-19 Weeks 20-23

Begin Quarterly

Performance

Report

ST. JOHNS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE 18-MONTH TIMELINE FOR LODIS IMPLMENTATION

Initiate LODIS Training

Complete LODIS Training

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit 150 items to DNA: SI

Submit Report

Weeks 48-51 Weeks 52-55 Weeks 56-59 Weeks 60-63 Weeks 64-67 Weeks 68-71

Complete Program Evaluation and submit Final Report

Submit Report

Submit Report

Begin Quarterly Performance Report

Begin Quarterly Performance Report

Section G: Key Program Staff

Sergeant David Tarbert, LODIS Coordinator - Sergeant Tarbert is the current supervisor of the Property Crimes Section, which oversees all Property and Financial related crimes. He has been employed by the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office for over 25 years and has extensive investigative and supervisory experience in every realm of criminal investigations (see attached work history). Sergeant Tarbert will be responsible for aspects of LODIS implementation, to include: research, training, program design, implementation, and program evaluation.

Evidence Section Supervisor Angela Hosford, LODIS Evidence Coordinator- A. Hosford is currently assigned as the supervisor of the Evidence Section, which oversees the intake and storage of evidence, and crime scene processing. She has been employed by the Sheriff's Office since 2005. A. Hosford was previously employed by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement from 2002 through 2005. During her tenure with FDLE, she served as a Crime Lab Technician and a Forensic Technologist. A. Hosford will be responsible for any and all evidence collected and submitted as it relates to the LODIS program.

Crime Scene Technician Stefanie Elliott, LODIS Evidence Review Specialist- S. Elliott is currently assigned to the Evidence Section as a Senior Crime Scene Technician where she is responsible for major case crime scene processing. She has been employed by the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office since 2004, during which time she has attained a Masters Degree in Forensic Science. S. Elliott will be responsible for reviewing all of the evidence submissions for inclusion to the LODIS program. S. Elliott, along with A. Hosford will prioritize evidence to ensure the "best" evidence will be forwarded to DNA: SI Labs for DNA processing.

Other Dedicated Representatives involved with Case Reviews are:

Prosecutors from the State Attorney's Office (7th Judicial Circuit) will be involved with LODIS implementation to ensure legal evidence collection protocol is established. Additionally, prosecutors will prosecute offenders identified as a result of LODIS database.

Section H: Program Partnerships

The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office understands the importance that key partnerships play in the successful implementation of the LODIS Program. The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office will be partnering with the following individuals for this initiative:

The St. Augustine Police Department: The St. Augustine Police Department has 49 full time sworn officers, as well as Reserve Officers. The St. Augustine Police Department has an annual budget of 3.6 million dollars. The St. Augustine Police Department operates under the direction of the Chief of Police. The agency is divided into divisions headed by Commanders who oversee daily operations. The agency has agreed to participate in the LODIS program and every patrol officer and criminal investigator will be trained in the various aspects of the LODIS program. Once trained, investigators and officers will collect DNA evidence and subject standards for inclusion to the LODIS database. The St. Augustine Police Department under this initiative will be limited to 50 sample submissions a month. The St. Augustine Police Department has agreed to sustain this program after the grant funding has expired and will contribute 25% of the overall annual funding of the program in the future (see letter of commitment Appendix G).

The St. Augustine Beach Police Department: The St. Augustine Beach Police Department has 11 full time sworn officers, as well as Reserve Officers. The St. Augustine Beach Police Department has an annual budget of 1.1 million dollars. The St. Augustine Beach Police Department operates under the direction of the Chief of Police. The agency has agreed to participate in the LODIS program and every patrol officer and criminal investigator will be trained in the various aspects of the LODIS program. Once trained, investigators and officers will collect DNA evidence and subject standards for inclusion to the LODIS database. The St. Augustine Beach Police Department under this initiative will be limited to 25 sample submissions a month. The St. Augustine Beach Police Department has agreed to sustain this program after the grant funding has expired and will contribute 10% of the overall annual funding of the program in the future. (A letter of commitment is included in Appendix G)

DNA SI: Labs: DNA: SI LABS was started in 1998 by a group of early genetic identification scientists. The original company was purchased in 2004 by AMI, a North Carolina technology company. Also in 2004 the laboratory was granted ASCLD/LAB accreditation for forensic DNA casework. In 2006 DNA: SI Labs built a new, 8,000 square foot laboratory. This facility, designed specifically for forensic DNA analysis, features twin labs for separate, isolated, and parallel processing of known and unknown specimens. Early in 2007 DNA: SI Labs started co-development of the concept that would become the LODIS system with the Palm Bay PD. This co-development refined the concept into a functional, efficient, DNA based investigative lead generation tool. In November, 2008 Palm Bay Police Department and DNA: SI was awarded the prestigious August Vollmer Award for Excellence in Forensic Science by a Law Enforcement Agency for their work creating LODIS. DNA: SI Labs will be providing the LODIS Program to the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office. Members from DNI: SI Labs will also conduct LODIS training for all personnel involved in the LODIS program. (A letter of commitment is included in Appendix G)

The State Attorney's Office (SAO), 7th Judicial Circuit: The State Attorney's Office boasts a staff of approximately 128, including more than 50 attorneys, 12 investigators, and a dedicated support staff. The State Attorney's Office will provide a representative to participate in the implementation of the LODIS Program who will offer expert advice and legal guidance as needed. The Office will also assist the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office in obtaining search and/or arrest warrants, subpoenas as well as search files for additional reports and other pertinent information regarding criminal investigations. (A letter of commitment is included in Appendix G)

Crime Stoppers of Northeast Florida, Inc.: Crime Stoppers will provide media coverage for the unsolved cases, a link to the St Johns County Sheriff's Office website, and will include information on its website requesting help from any person(s) who may have information that could lead to the successful conclusion of cases being investigated. (A letter of commitment is included in Appendix G)

Section I: Program Monitoring Process and Evaluation Plan:

The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office understands the importance of collecting data for the purposes of measuring the effectiveness of this program. The primary objectives of the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office are to:

Realize and increase LODIS Hits to link offenders to specific unsolved crimes.

Identify arrest and prosecute offenders identified as a result of LODIS Hits.

Increase Common Crime Solvability Rates by 20%.

Recover stolen property and reduce the monetary impact/loss sustained as a result of property crimes

The following performance measures will be collected and utilized by the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office LODIS Coordinator to determine the effectiveness of this initiative:

Performance Measures:

Data to be collected:

Create and populated LODIS Database

The number of evidentiary/scene samples collected and processed

The number of subject samples collected and submitted

Realize and increase LODIS Hits to link offenders to specific unsolved crimes

The number of scene samples yielding DNA profiles

The number of LODIS Hits identifying known subject profiles to unidentified scene profiles

Identify arrest and prosecute offenders identified as a result of LODIS Hits

The number of LODIS Hits that identify offenders

The number of individuals arrested and prosecuted as a result of LODIS technology

Increase Common Crime Solvability Rates by 20% and recover stolen property to reduce the monetary impact/loss sustained as a result of property crimes

Compare case clearance rates investigations utilizing LODIS versus case clearance rates prior to LODIS implementation during comparable time-frame

Monetary losses can be calculated same

This data will be collected monthly by the LODIS Coordinator. The data will then be included as a part of the LODIS Program quarterly and semi-annual progress reports, as well as a final comprehensive progress report.

The LODIS Coordinator will be responsible for ensuring the proper performance measure data is collected and reported throughout the 18 month initiative. Once the performance data is compiled, the information will be retained by the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office Grant Administrator for a period of 5 fiscal years (per Florida Statute).

Section J: Organizational Capacity

The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office is an Internationally (CALEA) and State (CFA) Accredited law enforcement agency. The St Johns County Sheriff's Office employs 592 men and women, with 280 certified law enforcement officers and 111 sworn detention employees. The agencies' 2010 budget is $56,036,841 (approved by the St. Johns County Board of Commissioners). The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office provides a full range of law enforcement services, detention, and 9-1-1 dispatch services. The agency is also responsible for maintaining the security of the St. Johns County Courts; as well as serving all criminal warrants and civil process orders issued by the courts.

David Shoar is the current elected Sheriff of St. Johns County, serving in his second term. As the Sheriff, David Shoar is statutorily considered the highest law enforcement entity within St. Johns County. Sheriff David Shoar has extensive experience in law enforcement management, as he was the former Chief of the St. Augustine Police Department. Sheriff David Shoar also possesses advanced educational degrees, including a Masters Degree in Public Administration. Sheriff David Shoar has demonstrated effective leadership, both in managing a large agency and responsibly overseeing a $56,000,000 annual budget. Under Sheriff David Shoar's direction, the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office serves as a model law enforcement entity in the region.

With regard to the acquisition, implementation, and management of grants, the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office aggressively seeks outside sources of funding to provide additional services for our community as well as to strengthen and provide more efficient and effective approaches to service delivery.

The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office has a documented track-record for efficiently and effectively managing funds obtained through grant opportunities. Over the past decade, the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office has successfully administered over 1.2 million dollars in grant funding, resulting in the implementation of several effective law enforcement programs. (See Appendix F for Previous and Current Awards)

Section K: Program Sustainability

Through this funding request, the LODIS program will be implemented and maintained for a period of 18 months. During this time-frame, program data will be will be collected and evaluated for overall program effectiveness. If the desired outcomes are achieved, the LODIS program will be sustained beyond the 18 month initiative. The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office is committed to funding the LODIS program, utilizing the annual budget, offset by funding obtained by the other participating/partnering agencies (St. Augustine Police Department and St. Augustine Beach Police Department). This monetary commitment has been expressly communicated to the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office. (See Appendix G for Letters of Commitment) Additionally, the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office will continue to seek funding opportunities in an effort to sustain successful and effective law enforcement programs.