The SQL Thin Client Application Computer Science Essay

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The SQL Thin Client application has been planned in somewhat different way compared to other applications. The SQL Thin Client uses user parameters to do all of its activities. There is no database as backend to the SQL Thin Client application as it stores nothing on itself. But on the other hand, SQL Thin Client does operate on database of user choice and performs user requested actions on those database and even stores data on to it.

The features offered by the SQL Thin Client or the general day to day activities of the administrator are not available less than one applications roof. The administrator has to use various tools to do achieve different tasks on different database systems. Shifting of applications between operations is time consuming and also lethargic to the user, often this makes overlooked errors and mistakes. Some of these errors may create chaotic situations, where recovering seems to be a nightmare. The solution to the problem is to bring a tool with all these operations without changing the applications or tools. There exist few tools / applications available to the administrator to do the activities mentioned in the overview. But the problem is that they are not integrated properly. Few of the applications of platform specific, they can't run on all operating systems.

PROBLEM IN EXISTING SYSTEM

In the existing System to perform any changes in the database, we have to depend on the database administrator. Until problem is solved by the DB admin, even administrator makes the changes, development team has to take the permission of the project managers to implement. For this Project Manager has to see what type of modifications are made on existing database design and what else is required. This is possible if both are available in the company. Otherwise the work will be disturbed. It effects on the delay of projects delivery to the clients.

SOLUTION OF THESE PROBLEMS

To overcome the above problems, SQL Thin Client product is designed. This allows the users to connect the company database remotely and make requested changes. This project allows the users to connect with the database without having any client softwares to be installed. The only requirement is web browser.

Feasibility study:

Feasibility study is conducted once the problem is clearly understood. Feasibility study is a high level capsule version of the entire system analysis and design process. The objective is to determine quickly at a minimum expense how to solve a problem. The purpose of feasibility is not to solve the problem but to determine if the problem is worth solving.

The system has been tested for feasibility in the following points.

1. Technical Feasibility

2. Economical Feasibility

3. Operational Feasibility.

1. Technical Feasibility:

The proposed system can be developed using existing technology or not. It is planned to implement the proposed system using ASP.NET with C# and databases are SQL Server 2000 / 2005.

The organization already possesses Windows XP & Windows 2000 server with Internet information Server (IIS) & Data bases. It is evident that the necessary hardware and software are available for development and implementation of the proposed system.

2. Economical Feasibility:

It is an evaluation of development cost weighed against the ultimate income or benefit derived from the developed system. Economic justification includes a broad range of concerns that includes cost-benefit analysis, long-term corporate income strategies, cost of resources needed for development.

The Organization has in place, the required Hardware for implementing the proposed system. The Organization has already satellite link, and a host of servers so it need not invest newly for the Internet connection. So the Organization need not incur any additional expenditure.

3. Operational Feasibility:

This test of feasibility asks if the system will work with least difficulties when it is developed and installed. The technical staff has sufficient knowledge of the tools being used and the users need just to know how to access and browse the site. Hence it is concluded that the system is operationally feasible.

HARDWARE & SOFTWARE SPECIFICATIONS

Software Requirements

Technology

Front End

ASP.NET

Business Logic

C#.NET

Back End

Sql Server 2000 / 2005

Web Server

Internet Information Server (IIS)

Web Browser

Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox

IDE

Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2005 / 2008

Internet Connection

Optional (Local network Preferable).

Hardware Requirements:

PIII 500MHZ or above

128MB RAM

100MB Free Hard disk space

STD Color Monitor

Network interface card or Modem (For Remote Sources)

INTRODUCTION

The SQL Thin Client enables you to easily manage your SQL data, wherever you are. Using its built-in features, you can do the following from Internet Explorer or your favorite web browser:

Create and edit databases in Microsoft SQL Server 2000 / 2005 or Microsoft SQL Data Engine (MSDE) 2000 /2005

Perform ad-hoc queries against databases and save them to your file system

Export and import database schema and data

Whether you are doing Windows or Web development, or just need access to data for yourself or your clients, the SQL Thin Client is the perfect complement to your toolbox.

LOGGING IN

Before you can use the SQL Thin Client, you will need to login to the server you wish to administer. SQL Thin Client supports integrated Windows authentication or SQL authentication. SQL Thin Client must be configured to deny anonymous access if you want to use integrated Windows authentication. Also, in order to use SQL Authentication, the SQL Server must be running in "Mixed Mode" (see the SQL Server documentation for more information).

Because SQL Thin Client runs on two different types of web servers that are different in capabilities and architecture the way you logon is also different. Below are the differences between the two web servers.

IIS Web Server

Windows Authentication

Username: You must fill out this section. (Example: domain|computer\login)

Password: You must fill out this section. (Example: password)

Server: You enter this data. Default is (local)

SQL Server Authentication

Username: A valid SQL login.

Password: Password for SQL login for username specified in Username field.

Server: You enter this data. Default is (local)

If you are using SQL authentication, you are prompted for your user name, password, and the server with which to connect. If you are using Windows authentication, SQL Thin Client automatically obtains your username credentials, so you only need to specify a server name.

Note: The SQL authentication security credentials are passed from the web browser to the SQL Thin Client using a normal plain-text form POST over HTTP. When using the SQL Thin Client over an unsecure network (the Internet, for example) it is recommended you enable secure socket layer (SSL) for this application.

After you successfully log in, the SQL Thin Client displays a list of databases viewable by your user account. From this screen you can create a new database or edit, query, and delete an existing one. You may also import or export a database to/from this server.

DATABASES

Databases page displays the list of available databases (and their sizes, in megabytes) for the currently logged in user. If the user does not have permission to view or edit a database, it will not be displayed. From this screen you can create, edit, query, or delete a database by clicking the links on this page.

CREATING DATABASES: To create a new database, click the "Create new database" link on the Databases page. Simply type a name for the database in the textbox and click the "Create" button. After submitting the name, you are directed to the Tables page, where you can create new tables for the database.

TABLES: choosing to edit a database from the Databases page directs you to the Tables page, which displays a list of tables in the selected database. When creating a new database, this page initially displays no tables. You may create a new table by clicking the "Create new table" link at the top of the page.

The list of tables includes the following information:

Property

Description

Name

The name of the table

Owner

The SQL Server role or SQL Server user that owns the table

Type

The type of the table (User | System)

Create Date

The date and time when the table was created

Rows

The number of data rows in the table

You may choose to show only User tables or both User and System tables using the Filter dropdown at the top of this page. You can also edit, query, or delete a table from this page by clicking the appropriate links.

EDIT TABLES

Choosing to edit a database from the Databases page directs you to the Tables page, which displays a list of tables in the selected database. When creating a new database, this page initially displays no tables. You may create a new table by clicking the "Create new table" link at the top of the page.

The list of tables includes the following information:

Property

Description

Name

The name of the table

Owner

The SQL Server role or SQL Server user that owns the table

Type

The type of the table (User | System)

Create Date

The date and time when the table was created

Rows

The number of data rows in the table

You may choose to show only User tables or both User and System tables using the Filter dropdown at the top of this page. You can also edit, query, or delete a table from this page by clicking the appropriate links.

DELETING DATABASES:

When you choose to delete a database from the Databases page, you are asked to confirm whether to proceed with the delete operation. Click "Yes" to complete the deletion and "No" to cancel the deletion. Once a database is deleted, it cannot be undone.

QUERYING DATABASES AND TABLES:

To query a database or table, select the "query" link on either the Databases or Tables page. The Query page displays a large text area in which to enter your query (using TSQL syntax). To execute your query, press the "Execute" button. When selecting data, results are displayed in grid-format at the bottom of the page (multiple selects display multiple grids). You can choose whether to wrap grid cell contents in results using the checkbox on this page.

Saving a query

Click the "Save query" button to save the text of the query to a file. Be sure to use the .sql extension when saving this file (place the filename in double quotes, for example "myQuery.sql").

Loading a query

You may reload a previously saved query by typing the path to the .sql file in the "Load Query" textbox (or Browse for the file instead) and clicking the "Load query" button.

IMPORTING DATABASES

The Import Database page allows you to re-create objects on the server using a previously generated export file. Enter the path to a .sql export file in the textbox and click the "Import" button to proceed.

EXPORTING DATABASES

You can export an entire database so that it may be imported into another server later. The Export Database page prompts you to select the name of the database you wish to export, followed by a list of options specifying which objects to export. The objects that may be exported are:

Database

Check this option when you are creating a complete backup of the database and need to save the name and file properties of the database. Note that if you later import this into a different server, you made need to change the path to the database file in the .sql file to match the target server's file system.

Table Schemas

Check this option to export the table and column structure of the database. This can be imported into the same or a different database later.

Table data

Check this option to export the actual data rows contained in the database tables.

Stored Procedures

Check this option to export the stored procedures in the database.

You may also choose a few options that determine how the .sql export file is generated. Drop commands are used to explicitly delete pre-existing objects by the same name before attempting to create new objects during Import. Including descriptive comments makes the .sql file more readable, although slightly larger.

Click the "Export" button to export the selected objects to a file. Be sure to use the .sql extension when saving this file (place the filename in double quotes, for example "myDBExport.sql").

DATABASE PROPERTIES

The properties of a database are displayed on the Properties page, available from the left-side navigation menu. Several read-only properties are displayed:

Property

Description

Name

The name of the database

Status

The status of the database

Owner

The SQL Server role or SQL Server user that owns the database

Date created

The date and time when the database was created

Size

The size (in megabytes) of the database file

Space available

The space available in the database file

Number of users

The number of users in the database

You can also specify the expansion space allocated for the backend database file and transaction log associated with the selected database. The file name, location, and file group are chosen for you by the Thin Client. The "Automatically grow file" option specifies that data files automatically increase in size by the amount indicated in the following options.

In megabytes

Specify the number of megabytes by which to grow the data files.

By percent

Specify the percentage by which you want the data files to grow automatically.

Unrestricted file growth

Specify that the data file growth will be unrestricted.

Restrict file growth (MB)

Specify the size in megabytes to which a restricted data file can grow.

When "Automatically grow file" is not selected, the database file or transaction log will not grow automatically and will remain a fixed sized (see read-only properties above).

DATABASE ROLES

Roles are a powerful tool that allows you to collect users into a single unit against which you can apply permissions. Permissions granted to, denied to, or revoked from a role also apply to any members of the role. You can establish a role that represents a job performed by a class of workers in your organization and grant the appropriate permissions to that role. As workers rotate into the job, you simply add them as a member of the role; as they rotate out of the job, remove them from the role. You do not have to repeatedly grant, deny, and revoke permissions to or from each person as they accept or leave the job. The permissions are applied automatically when the users become members of the role.

Editing a Database Role

You may add or remove database users to or from a database role. System database roles consist of read only properties that you may not change. User defined database roles cannot be created using this tool.

DATABASE USERS

Overview

A user identifier (ID) identifies a user within a database. All permissions and ownership of objects in the database are controlled by the user account. User accounts are specific to a database; the xyz user account in the sales database is different from the xyz user account in the inventory database, even though both accounts have the same ID. User IDs are defined by members of the db_owner fixed database role.

A login ID by itself does not give a user permissions to access objects in any databases. A login ID must be associated with a user ID in each database before anyone connecting with that login ID can access objects in the databases. If a login ID has not been explicitly associated with any user ID in a database, it is associated with the guest user ID. If a database has no guest user account, a login cannot access the database unless it has been associated with a valid user account.

When a user ID is defined, it is associated with a login ID. For example, a member of the db_owner role can associate the Microsoft® Windows® 2000 login NETDOMAIN\Joe with user ID abc in the sales database and user ID def in the employee database. The default is for the login ID and user ID to be the same.

Adding a Database User

To add a new database user click the Create New User link located towards the upper right hand of the screen. You will then be prompted to select the SQL Server login that the new user will be associated to. You may also define the user name if you wish it to differ from the SQL Server login name.

Editing a Database User

You may add or remove database roles to or from a database user. You may also use SQL Enterprise Manager to determine granular permissions for a specific user.

Removing a Database User

On the database users view, click Delete to remove a database user.

TABLES

Choosing to edit a database from the Databases page directs you to the Tables page, which displays a list of tables in the selected database. When creating a new database, this page initially displays no tables. You may create a new table by clicking the "Create new table" link at the top of the page.

The list of tables includes the following information:

Property

Description

Name

The name of the table

Owner

The SQL Server role or SQL Server user that owns the table

Type

The type of the table (User | System)

Create Date

The date and time when the table was created

Rows

The number of data rows in the table

You may choose to show only User tables or both User and System tables using the Filter dropdown at the top of this page. You can also edit, query, or delete a table from this page by clicking the appropriate links.

CREATING TABLES

To create a new table, click the "Create new table" link on the Tables page. Simply type a name for the table in the textbox and click the "Create" button. After submitting the name, you are directed to the Edit Column page, where you can create new columns for the table.

COLUMNS

Choosing to edit a table from the Tables page directs you to the Columns page, which displays a list of columns in the selected table. You may create a new column by clicking the "Create new column" link at the top of the page.

The list of columns displays the following information:

Property

Description

Key

Indicates that the column is the primary key in the table

ID

Indicates that the column is an auto-incrementing identifier

Name

The name of the column

Data Type

The data type for the column

Size

The size (in bytes) of the column

Nulls

Indicates that the column allows null values

Default

The default value for the column

You can also edit or delete a column from this page by clicking the appropriate links. Note that columns are only editable if the table itself contains no data. That is, you can redesign an existing table only if it is empty.

DELETING TABLES

When you choose to delete a table from the Tables page, you are asked to confirm whether to proceed with the delete operation. Click "Yes" to complete the deletion and "No" to cancel the deletion. Once a table is deleted, it cannot be undone.

QUERYING DATABASES AND TABLES

To query a database or table, select the "query" link on either the Databases or Tables page. The Query page displays a large text area in which to enter your query (using TSQL syntax). To execute your query, press the "Execute" button. When selecting data, results are displayed in grid-format at the bottom of the page (multiple selects display multiple grids). You can choose whether to wrap grid cell contents in results using the checkbox on this page.

Saving a query

Click the "Save query" button to save the text of the query to a file. Be sure to use the .sql extension when saving this file (place the filename in double quotes, for example "myQuery.sql").

Loading a query

You may reload a previously saved query by typing the path to the .sql file in the "Load Query" textbox (or Browse for the file instead) and clicking the "Load query" button.

RENAMING TABLES

To rename a table, click the "rename" link on the Tables page. When prompted, type the new name for the table and click the "Rename" button. You may click "Cancel" to abort this operation instead.

Caution: Think carefully before you rename a table. If existing queries, views, user-defined functions, stored procedures, or programs refer to that table, the name modification will make these objects invalid.

COLUMNS

Choosing to edit a table from the Tables page directs you to the Columns page, which displays a list of columns in the selected table. You may create a new column by clicking the "Create new column" link at the top of the page.

The list of columns displays the following information:

Property

Description

Key

Indicates that the column is the primary key in the table

ID

Indicates that the column is an auto-incrementing identifier

Name

The name of the column

Data Type

The data type for the column

Size

The size (in bytes) of the column

Nulls

Indicates that the column allows null values

Default

The default value for the column

You can also edit or delete a column from this page by clicking the appropriate links. Note that columns are only editable if the table itself contains no data. That is, you can redesign an existing table only if it is empty.

EDITING COLUMNS

The Edit Column page lists a set of properties for a column within a table. You may set each property when creating or altering a column. Note that a column can only be edited if no data exists in the table.

Primary Key

Determines whether the column is the primary key field for the selected table.

Column Name

The name of the column.

Data Type

The data type for the column.

Length

The length in bytes of the data type.

Allow Null

Determines whether the column allows null values.

Default Value

The default for this column whenever a row with a null value for this column is inserted into the table. To create a default constraint for the column, enter the default value directly as text. Note: varchar, text, and character values should be surrounded in single quotes (for example, 'my default'). Surrounding parentheses are optional.

Precision

The maximum number of digits for values of this column.

Scale

The maximum number of digits that can appear to the right of the decimal point for values of this column.

Identity

Determines whether the column is used by SQL Server as an identifier column. A table can have only one column defined as an Identity, and that column must be defined using the decimal, int, numeric, smallint, bigint, or tinyint data type.

Identity Seed

The seed value of an identity column. This option applies only to columns whose Identity option is checked.

Identity Increment

The increment value (that is added to the identity value of the previous row) of an identity column. This option applies only to columns whose Identity option is checked.

Is RowGuid

Determines whether the column is used by SQL Server as a ROWGUID column. You can check this value only for a column that is an identity column.

Warning: There is a potential for column data loss when updating an existing column that has been created or modified outside of the Web Data Administrator tool. Properties such as foreign keys and indexes are not preserved when editing an existing column.

DELETING COLUMNS

When you choose to delete a column from the Columns page, you are asked to confirm whether to proceed with the delete operation. Click "Yes" to complete the deletion and "No" to cancel the deletion. Once a column is deleted, it cannot be undone.

Note: you cannot delete a column if it is the only column in the table. In this case, use "Delete Table" instead.

STORED PROCEDURES

The Stored Procedures page, available from the left-side navigation menu when editing a database, displays a list of stored procedures in the selected database. When creating a new database, this page initially displays no procedures. You may create a new stored procedure by clicking the "Create new stored procedure" link at the top of the page.

The list of stored procedures includes the following information:

Property

Description

Name

The name of the stored procedure

Owner

The SQL Server role or SQL Server user that owns the stored procedure

Type

The type of the stored procedure (User | System)

Create Date

The date and time when the stored procedure was created

You may choose to show only User stored procedures or both User and System stored procedures using the Filter dropdown at the top of this page. You can also edit or delete a stored procedure from this page by clicking the appropriate links.

CREATING STORED PROCEDURES

To create a new stored procedure, click the "Create new stored procedure" link on the Stored Procedures page. Simply type a name for the stored procedure in the textbox and click the "Create" button. After submitting the name, you are directed to the Edit Stored Procedure page, where you can edit the syntax of the stored procedure before saving.

EDITING STORED PROCEDURES

The Edit Stored Procedure page allows you to modify the syntax of an existing or newly created stored procedure. The stored procedure must contain a series of valid TSQL statements. Click the "Save" button to commit your changes, or the "Cancel" button to abort the edit operation.

DELETING STORED PROCEDURES

When you choose to delete a stored procedure from the Stored Procedures page, you are asked to confirm whether to proceed with the delete operation. Click "Yes" to complete the deletion and "No" to cancel the deletion. Once a stored procedure is deleted, it cannot be undone.

SECURITY

The SQL Thin Clientuses SQL authentication or integrated Windows authentication in order to establish a connection to the database server. If you are connecting to Microsoft SQL Server using SQL authentication, it should be running in "Mixed Mode" (see the SQL Server documentation for more information).

All operations in the SQL Thin Client are performed on behalf of the logged in user account. If the database server disallows certain privileges to that account, an error will be returned and displayed. While account privileges cannot be administered through the SQL Thin Client, it will respect any security restrictions enforced by the backend database server.

SERVER LOGINS

Overview

SQL Server logins provide a means for authenticating connections made to the SQL Server database. A login may include database users to allow access to a particular database.

Adding a SQL Server Login

To add a new login click the Create new Login link located towards the upper right hand of the screen. The following table describes the fields that are necessary in order to create a new login:

Property

Description

Authentication Method

Determines whether you want to use Windows Integrated or SQL based authentication.

Login Name

Name of the SQL login you wish to create. This should be the same as the Windows login you wish to use if Windows Integrated is selected as the Authentication Method (eg: [domain name]\[username]).

Password

The password associated with this login. This property is applicable only when SQL based authentication is selected.

After clicking Create Login you will be sent to the edit screen for that login so that you may edit additional properties. Please see Editing a SQL Server Login for more information.

Editing a SQL Server Login

After a login has been created, it may be necessary to change the password, default database, or default language. For example, a user may forget her password, want to change the password for security reasons, need to use a different database on a regular basis, or need to see messages in a different language. When you are done making changes click Save Changes to commit the changes to the system.

You may edit multiple properties which are divided into the following sections: General, Server Roles, and Database Access.

General

This section allows you to manage general properties.

Property

Description

Security Access

This option is only applicable when a login uses Windows Authentication. Select Grant if you wish to grant login access to a Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 account. Select Deny if you wish to deny login access to a Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 account.

Default Database

The default database for this login.

Default Language

The default language for this login.

Server Roles

This section allows you to view, add, or remove roles for this login.

Database Access

This section allows you to specify which databases this login has access to. When a login has access to a database a database user is created for that database. See Database Users for more information.

Removing a SQL Server Login

You cannot remove SQL Server Logins with this tool. Please use the SQL Server Enterprise Manager to perform this operation.

ERRORS

There a several types of errors that can be reported from the SQl Thin Client.

Validation Errors

These errors occur when the SQL Thin Client attempts to assert some condition that fails. Some examples are:

Failure to enter data in a field that is required, like omitting the name when creating a new database

Failure to enter the correct data type in a particular field, like setting the length of a varchar column to a non-integer number

Attempting to access an object that no longer exists, like a table that has been deleted from outside the SQL Thin Client tool.

SQL-DMO Errors

These errors are reported by the SQL-DMO library when the SQL Thin Client attempts to perform an operation on the connected database server for which it has given invalid parameters or has insufficient permission to complete. For example:

There was an error saving the stored procedure.

[Microsoft][ODBC SQL Server Driver][SQL Server]Line 2: Incorrect syntax near 'select'.

Unhandled Errors

Unhandled errors are unanticipated by the SQl Thin Client, and are displayed as stack trace information indicating the exception and location in source code where the error occurred.

UML DIAGRAMS

CONTEXT DIAGRAM :

0.0

SQL Thin Client

Database Server

Client

Top-level Diagram:

Security Settings

Create Database

SQL Server

Client UID, PWD, HOST Connection

Web Server

Create Tables, Stored Procedures, Functions, Views, Perform DML Operations etc.

Export Database

Import Database

Create Users

Structure Charts

Structure charts are used during architectural design to document hierarchical structure, parameters, and interconnections in a system. A structure chart differs from a flowchart in two ways: a structure can be suppressed in a structure chart.

The structure chart can be augmented with module-by-module specification of the input and output parameters, as well as the input and output parameter attributes. During architectural design the parameters are abstract; they are refined into concrete representations during detailed design.

Modules:

Architectural design has the goal of producing well-structured, modular software systems.

A software module to be named entity having the following characteristics.

Modules contain instructions, processing logic, and data structures.

Modules can be separately compiled and stored in a library.

Modules can be included in a program.

Module segments can be used by invoking a name and some parameters.

Modules can use other modules.

STRUCTURED CHART OF SQL THIN CLIENT:

Windows Authentication

Login Page

SQL Server Authentication

Main Page

Database

Security

Export

Import

Logins

Create New Database

Edit User Settings

View All the Users

Import the Databases from Other Servers

Perform DDL Operations

Server Roles

Export the Database

Add New Role

Entire Database

Only Tables

Only Table Data

Table Schemas

Only Stored Procedures

Only Functions

Perform DML Operations

Edit the Existing Role

Security Settings

Create User Accounts

Grant the Permissions

Administrator Use Case Diagram

Create New Database

Perform DDL Operations

Administrator

Perform DML Operations

Import Databases

Export Databases

Security Settings

Create Database Use Case Diagram

Create New Database

Edit Existing Database

Delete the Database

Query the Database

User

Grant Permissions to Database

Import Database Use case Diagram

Select The Source .Sql File

Provide the Name for Database

Provide the permissions to users to use the databaseUSER

Export Database Use Case Diagram

Select the Database to Export

Select the Objects to Export

User

Export Database to File

Select the Export Options

Security Use Case Diagram

Create New Logins

Logins

Edit Existing Logins

Assign Roles to Logins

Add or Edit Role

List All the Logins

Server Roles

User

Database ServerAdministrator Sequence Diagram

User

<<process>> Login

<<Valid>>

<<Invalid>>

Show Main Page

<<uses>>

Windows Authentication or SQL Server Authentication

<<Action >>

Databases

Import

Export

Security

<<Process>>

Logout

Table

Database

Database ServerDatabase Sequence Diagram

Login

Create new database

Edit Existing Database

Query Data from Table

Create Tables or Enter Data

Database

Database ServerImport Database Sequence Diagram

Login

Browse the .sql file

Provide Name for Database

<<Process>>

New Database

Export Database Sequence Diagram

Database

Database Server

Login

Select the database to export

Select the Objects to export

Database is exported to file

Select Export Options

<<Process>>

Security Sequence Diagram

Database

Database Server

Login

Create / edit Server Roles

Security Options

Create / edit Logins

Assign roles to logins &

Assign database access

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