Simple Network Management Protocol Snmp Computer Science Essay

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The Simple Network Management Protocol is an application layer protocol designed to handle complex communication networks. SNMP works by sending messages called Protocol Data Units (PDUs) to various parts of a network. SNMP compliant devices called agents gather data about themselves in Management Information Bases (MIBs) and return this data to the SNMP servers. 

There are two versions of SNMP as Version 1 and Version 2.

File Transfer Protocol - FTP

File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a standard network protocol used to exchange and control files over a TCP/IP based network such as the internet. FTP is built on client-server architecture and uses separate control and data connections between the client and server applications. Applications were originally interactive command-line tools with standardized command syntax, but graphical user interfaces have been developed for all desktop operating systems in use nowadays. FTP is also often utilized as an application component to automatically transfer files for program internal functions. FTP can be used with user-based password authentication or with unidentified user access. The Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) is similar, but simplify, not interoperable and unauthenticated edition of FTP.

Trivial File Transfer Protocol -TFTP

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TFTP stands for Trivial File Transfer Protocol that's very similar to FTP, but uses UDP protocol for file transfer. UDP, as talks about elsewhere is considered to an unreliable protocol. Therefore, TFTP is not frequently used for normal file transfer applications.

DHCP - Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a computer networking protocol made use by hosts (DHCP clients) to retrieve IP address assignments and other configuration information. DHCP utilizes client-server architecture. The client sends a broadcast ask for configuration information. The DHCP server takes delivery of the request and responds with configuration information from its configuration database.

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol - SMTP

SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) is a TCP/IP protocol utilized for sending e-mail messages between servers and from a client machine to a server. An email client such as MS Outlook Express makes us of SMTP for sending emails and POP3/IMAP for receiving emails from the server to the client machine. In other words, we normally use a program that employs SMTP for sending e-mail and either POP3 or IMAP for receiving messages from our local (or ISP) server. SMTP is regularly implemented to operate over Transmission Control Protocol port 25.  

Post Office Protocol - POP3

POP3 stands for Post of Protocol version 3 and it is used for fetching messages from an email server.  Most commonly used POP3 client programs contain Outlook Express and Mozilla Thunderbird.

Internet Message Access Protocol - IMAP

The Internet Message Access Protocol (commonly known as IMAP or IMAP4) allows a local client to right to use e-mail on a remote server. The current version, IMAP version 4 is identified by RFC 3501. IMAP4 and POP3 are the two most common internet standard protocols for e-mail retrieval.

Network File System - NFS

Network File System is a distributed file system which permits a computer to transparently access files over a network. 

UDP - User Datagram Protocol

The User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is one of the main members of the Internet Protocol Suite, the set of network protocols used for the Internet. With UDP, computer applications can send messages, in this case referred to as datagram, to other hosts on an Internet Protocol (IP) network without needing prior communications to set up special transmission channels or data paths.

Telnet

The Telnet service supplies remote login ability. This allows a user on one machine log into another machine and act as if they are directly in front of the remote machine. The connection can be anywhere on the local network, or on another network anywhere in the world, as long as the user has authorization to log into the remote system. Telnet uses TCP to maintain a link between two machines and it uses port number 23.

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol - HTTP

A protocol made use to transfer hypertext pages across the World Wide Web. HTTP defines how messages are formatted and transmitted and what actions Web servers and browsers should take in response to a variety of commands. For example, when we enter a URL in our browser, this really sends an HTTP command to the Web server directing it to fetch and transmit the requested Web page. Note that HTML transactions with how Web pages are formatted and displayed in a browser.

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HTTP is called a stateless protocol because each command is executed independently, without any knowledge of the commands that came earlier it.

UDP (User Datagram Protocol)

The User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is one of the core members of the Internet Protocol Suite, the set of network protocols used for the Internet. With UDP, computer applications can send messages, in this case referred to as datagrams, to other hosts on an Internet Protocol (IP) network without requiring prior communications to set up special transmission channels or data paths. UDP is sometimes called the Universal Datagram Protocol. The protocol was designed by David P. Reed in 1980.

TCP (Transmission Control Protocol)

The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is one of the core protocols of the Internet Protocol Suite. TCP is one of the two original components of the suite (the other being Internet Protocol, or IP), so the entire suite is commonly referred to as TCP/IP. Whereas IP handles lower-level transmissions from computer to computer as a message makes its way across the Internet, TCP operates at a higher level, concerned only with the two end systems, for example a Web browser and a Web server. In particular, TCP provides reliable, ordered delivery of a stream of bytes from a program on one computer to another program on another computer. Besides the Web, other common applications of TCP include e-mail and file transfer. Among its other management tasks, TCP controls segment size, flow control, the rate at which data is exchanged, and network traffic congestion.

DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)

The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a computer networking protocol used by hosts (DHCP clients) to retrieve IP address assignments and other configuration information.

DHCP uses a client-server architecture. The client sends a broadcast request for configuration information. The DHCP server receives the request and responds with configuration information from its configuration database.

HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol)

The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an Application Layer protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information systems.

HTTP is a request/response standard typical of client-server computing. In HTTP, web browsers or spiders typically act as clients, while an application running on the computer hosting the web site acts as a server. The client, which submits HTTP requests, is also referred to as the user agent. The responding server, which stores or creates resources such as HTML files and images, may be called the origin server. In between the user agent and origin server may be several intermediaries, such as proxies, gateways, and tunnels.

FTP (File Transfer Protocol)

File Transfer Protocol(FTP)is a standard network protocol used to exchange and manipulate files over a TCP/IP based network, such as the Internet. FTP is built on a client-server architecture and utilizes separate control and data connections between the client and server applications. Applications were originally interactive command-line tools with a standardized command syntax, but graphical user interfaces have been developed for all desktop operating systems in use today. FTP is also often used as an application component to automatically transfer files for program internal functions. FTP can be used with user-based password authentication or with anonymous user access. The Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) is a similar, but simplified, not interoperable, and unauthenticated version of FTP.

Telnet (Telnet Remote Protocol)

Telnet (teletype network) is a network protocol used on the Internet or local area networks to provide a bidirectional interactive communications facility. Typically, telnet provides access to a command-line interface on a remote host via a virtual terminal connection which consists of an 8-bit byte oriented data connection over the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). User data is interspersed in-band with TELNET control information.

SSH (Secure Shell Remote Protocol)

Secure Shell or SSH is a network protocol that allows data to be exchanged using a secure channel between two networked devices.[1] Used primarily on GNU/Linux and Unix based systems to access shell accounts, SSH was designed as a replacement for Telnet and other insecure remote shells, which send information, notably passwords, in plaintext, leaving them open for interception. The encryption used by SSH provides confidentiality and integrity of data over an insecure network, such as the Internet.

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POP3 (Post Office Protocol 3)

Post Office Protocol (POP) is an application-layer Internet standard protocol used by local e-mail clients to retrieve e-mail from a remote server over a TCP/IP connection. POP and IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol) are the two most prevalent Internet standard protocols for e-mail retrieval. Virtually all modern e-mail clients and servers support both. The POP protocol has been developed through several versions, with version 3 (POP3) being the current standard.

SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol)

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) is an Internet standard for electronic mail (e-mail) transmission across Internet Protocol (IP) networks. SMTP was first defined in RFC 821.