Mail Order And Customer Management Database Computer Science Essay

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The purpose of this project is to research common usability issues with computer systems applications, databases, forms etc and then to apply that research to a database that is being created for the Ashwood Nurseries Mail Order department. The database will be able to showcase and take advantage of a number of improvements to the usability of the system, which were found during the research stage of the project.

Over the past few years they have started developing a mail order service so that they can send products around the country and into other countries easily. They currently use a free template in Microsoft access that is supposed to be used as an address book to manage some of the tasks within the mail order system. Customers are added into the contact database and the notes section is used to note the orders; which is not ideal and has large disadvantages. A large proportion of their system is still paper based that gets word-processed onto the computer to print out dockets for the parcels.

I intend to create them a database designed so that it is suitable for what they intend to use it for, rather than using a personal contact database that isn't fit for purpose. The database will keep a record of their customer's personal details such as name, address, email address and a record of what they buy. Keeping such details would be to mainly make it easier to print out invoices rather than keeping a paper based version of the order to then type it out into a excel spreadsheet template. It would stop some repetition and save some time as the order can be inputted onto the database ready for the invoice to be printed.

The database will be designed and developed with input from the mail order team at Ashwood Nurseries. Getting the members of staff to assist me with the design mean that I can ensure the database is going to work as they intend it to.

Literature Review

Design

The design behind a database is what is the most important aspect of creating a database, having an incorrect design for a database or a design that is not suited to the job of the database can have a serious impact on the data integrity a few months or years down the line. It is important to get it correct from the outset. Tidwell (2010), Churcher (2007) and Teorey et al (2011) all agree that design should be a very important factor when developing a new database system, however Churcher (2007) goes as far to say that personal safety along with business collapse, money loss for customers and shareholders can be to a consequence for bad database design. (Churcher, 2007, p.xxl).

Included in the design are basic objects such as entities, relationships and attributes and then there are more complicated items such as generalization (supertypes and subtypes), aggregation and more complex relationship models. (Teorey et al., 2011, p.13). Churcher (2007) States that its not possible to know if a design is certain to be correct however we can say that it meets the requirements of a problem within a given scope and subject to certain assumptions and approximations (Churcher, 2007, p.75) Whilst there are many different design techniques when creating a database research and experience tells me that the best way would be the waterfall model. In both of my chosen research books by Churcher (2007) and Teorey et al (2011) they also recommend doing the 'waterfall' approach. This consists of:

"Requirements - collected by speaking to the company directors and users of the database. It is important to understand the type of data being entered into the database and how the data is related to each other. This can be done by either looking at existing company data (digital or paper) or example data."

"Design - A conceptual data model diagram, which shows all of the data and how it's related. One of the most popular techniques is by using an entity relationship diagram."

"Implementation - is the physical development of the database in the chosen software framework. In our case its Microsoft Access but the design is generic so it should be designed so the same database can be designed in whatever platform."

"Testing - once the database has been designed and developed using the chosen software platform, it must be tested. This should be extensive testing populating at least 5 entries in every table."

"Maintenance - maintenance ensures that the database data stays consistent and redundant data gets resolved." (Teorey et al., 2011).

Databases are hard to design, modify, and query (Goldman, 2008), they cant just be designed and have a simple search engine to find data Search engines are great; for simple keyboard query based searches, but would be impractical on a database (Agrawal et al., 2002). Search engines offer an extremely high level of good usability, they are simple, easy to use and have very basic pages. If you are used to using one particular search engine and then swap to another you would be able to use it with no problems even having never looked at it before. The reason why a database cannot just be connected with a simple search engine is mainly due to the users expectations being different with the different systems (Jagadish et al., 2007). People expect a query in a database to be a more sophisticated way of searching, they expect the results to be complete, and only relevant records being returned. With a search engine users accept that the results will not always be correct and related to the keyword entered into the search, very often it will return false results (Jagadish et al., 2007).

Database information systems provide a much higher level of value, as the users are able to get information in and out efficiently and easy (University of Illinois, (No Date)). The only downside for a user of the database is that database queries are difficult for an everyday user to adopt and create, as it requires the user to have fully comprehensive knowledge of the structure of the database (Yu, 2007). Even the logical structure layer of a database is still to low for an everyday user. They must be able to interact fully with the database just by using forms. According to Jagadish (2007) Databases have large groups of people working with them, many administrators, technical support and consultants work with users to correctly get data in and out of databases. Having a good database design is the key to ensuring that your data gets stored correctly so that users can input and retrieve data quickly and efficiently (Davidson, 2007). Because users cannot interact with the database directly the database administrators have to interpose themselves in between the technical database software and the users (or interface that the users use) (Jagadish et al., 2007).

Many years ago to book something e.g a theatre show you would have to phone a call centre and the operator would give you information such as dates, prices and seats. They would also be able to book the reservation for you, in recent years it has became a lot easier to book things such as tickets online. Users would be able to load a website up that has a direct connection to a central booking database with real time booking information (seats and date availability and cost) so the user can browse at their leisure to find a suitable seat at a reasonable price where as you may have been more hesitant to ask the advisor. This change in process is mainly due to how easy designers have made the electronic systems for the average person to use; they have good design with good usability allowing this to happen.

Usability

When designing a database it is important to take into account the Usability. When an application is designed, it should be designed with two aspects in mind. Firstly so that it works from a technical point of view and does what it has been commissioned to do but then secondly so that it is designed well in terms of looks and interaction. An application could have been designed and coded to a military standard in the background, but if the interface that administrator's use is not well designed it could cause problems when entering data and then the coding is virtually irrelevant. This is where usability comes in, if an application has good usability then the user should be able to navigate and use the application without consulting a manual or requiring a large amount of training.

Applications should share common features and place similar tools/functions within certain places so a user can learn a 'set of rules'

"When you focus on the user and not the product, you learn what works for your users, as well as what doesn't work, what pleases, what puzzles, and what frustrates them. You understand your users ' experience with the product to determine whether the design matches their expectations and supports their goals." (Barnum, 2012). Having good usability improves staff morale, stress levels and therefore improving productivity.

Catarci (2000) touches on the fact that success of computerized systems completing tasks still do rely heavily on human interaction. The fact that computers are getting better at automating tasks and solving problems they still cannot solve work organization problems which still require human intervention. Barnum (2012) Says that the usability should be inherent, it should be invisible. If the user has to think about how to do something or has to think twice about where to click then its possible that the usability isn't to its best. The user shouldn't have to bend at will of the product; it should work the way we want it to work (Barnum, 2012, p.1). Usability.gov, (No Date) backs up what was said but they have specified in more detail what is involved with usability such as Intuitive design, ease of learning, and efficiency of use, memorability and subjective satisfaction.

Sonderegger & Sauer (2010) and Usability.gov (2009) both suggest that design aesthesis has a huge impact on usability; if a resource is dull and not very pleasing to the eye it affects how a user interacts with it. This could be a website, application, database or in fact any form based system.

Usability First (2013) says that often systems are designed and focussed purely on the business aims/objectives, technical functions and capabilities compared to previous systems. Most likely commissioned and supervised by the company directors and very little thought going into how the users of the applications are going to be using them. Usability.gov (No Date) agrees with 'Usability First' in that the system should be designed not just on aims and objectives but also on common grounds that all the operatives of the application software agree on. At the end of the software development process it will be these end users that will be using the software rather than directors of the business and therefore they should have an input on the design of the application, in both terms of features and aesthetic design.

User centred designs take into account the needs of the end users, Quesenbery (2011) has came up with "The 5E's to understanding users", these are five questions that can be asked when looking at the usability requirements of the users.

 "Effective: How completely and accurately the work or experience is completed or goals reached"

"Efficient: How quickly this work can be completed"

"Engaging: How well the interface draws the user into the interaction and how pleasant and satisfying it is to use"

"Error Tolerant: How well the product prevents errors and can help the user recover from mistakes that do occur"

"Easy to Learn: How well the product supports both the initial orientation and continued learning throughout the complete lifetime of use"

(Usability.gov, (No Date)) and (Wainewright, 2010) believes that aesthetic design is an important feature of a software application, a users perception of an application can trigger a range of different emotions and attitudes towards the application. It is a common known fact that everyone sometime in their life have made visual judgements about someone or something. These assumptions are also apparent in software applications (Usability.gov, 2009). They affect how a user thinks and feels about a product. If for example a call centre operative is having problems with their software when talking to a customer, this could in fact affect the attitude to the customer and have an negative affect awareness and cause bad publicity. The design needs to satisfy the user with a more efficient and friendly experience (Quesenbery, 2011).

Many sources such as Quesenbery (2011), Usability.gov (No Date) Wainewright (2010) and Tidwell, 2011 agree that having an intuitive design is imperative to good usability. The interface should require a "nearly effortless understanding of the architecture and navigation of the site" (Quesenbery, 2011).

When using an application, we get from A to B by using navigation, this may be using buttons on the screen, point and clicking objects with our mouse or using keyboard shortcuts (Tidwell, 2011). However we look at it unless there are functions there that allow us to navigate the software then its virtually useless. Users that experience navigation problems would have to spend more time doing the tasks that should take a fraction of the time if the navigation was designed correctly (Davidson, 2007). If less time is spent doing a task then more tasks can be completed, saving the company money. However, just because you have a point and click graphical user interface (GUI) or a navigation bar, doesn't necessarily mean that users can find what they are looking for. Questions can be asked in the designing stage, prior to testing. How do users know where they are? How do they know where to go next? How do I get from here to there? By creating and providing certain tools the user can answer all of those questions (Usability First, 2013).

Sometimes we cannot help how large an application is, the more interfaces, pages or windows that an application has the more complicated it will be to try and design correctly. Little tools such as 'Breadcrumbs' can be used so that a user can track his/her journey to a current page. It will allow them to have an idea of where they are in the application. Good clear and concise calls to action signage within an application will allow users to anticipate what they are looking for next, in a sort of automatic, none conscious way. Users like consistency, they like the fact that common features within different applications are in the same place for instance to close a window or application a user would automatically expect the 'X' (close button) to be at the top right of the modal window. This is because most applications use the same layout.

All of the most common tools should be present within the interface which is used the most, it would be beneficial for tools that are commonly used within multiple forms/screens to also be included in those. Maybe via a navigation section that is present on every form. There can be too many tools within one form also, try not to over clutter as this can have the opposite affect. If the tools are needed but aren't often used then move them onto another window, or menu somewhere. Another usability improvement for more advanced users wouldn't keyboard shortcuts that allow you to open sections of the application without using a mouse, significantly improving opening time.

All applications have errors - it is inevitable. Sometimes due to a crash within the software, other times because a user has done something that the application doesn't quite understand. It could also be because the user has tried entering a type of data into a field in which it doesn't understand or allow. Even in the event of an error the user must be able to recover from it. No user likes errors, but it makes it slightly less stressful when the error is in an understandable language that they can understand and interpret, not computer terminology. Validation and input masks on fields will guide the user into entering data into the field that it will accept in a recognisable format. Where possible it would help users to have common fields that are indexed for fast searching and 'predictive' text, so that it guesses what is being entered (if its been entered in the field before). Simple buttons to move between records will help navigation and integration with other software packages e.g. allowing exporting invoices to Excel.

To ensure that usability is as best as it could be testing can be conducted. There are multiple ways of testing, some of which are simple like form testing with user feedback and others that include advanced technology like eye tracking equipment. Both obviously have quite high-varied costs. (Sonderegger & Sauer, 2010). Barnum (2012) Explains the differences between the different testing methods where other authors such as Sonderegger & Sauer (2010) and Bruun et al (2009) just use user testing methods under time constraints or see how long it takes for a test user to complete a task and change the design to try and improve the time taken to enter data. Barnum (2012) Gives different approaches to testing and believes that testing can be done in or out of a lab, with or without the test user and whether or not the developer needs to be present when testing takes place.

If a company should choose to go down the eye-tracking route to test the product for usability, then they should conduct the experiments in a lab that is already setup to conduct these types of tests. Sometimes eye tracking may be a little overkill should the product not be sizeable, in which case some more simpler tests can be conducted. (Barnum, 2012)

Testing is important to make sure that firstly the product is what the customer is expecting and secondly to make sure that the people that will be using the database, will be able to use it. It is important when testing software that you focus on the user themselves and not the product, you must know what works well with some of your users and what doesn't work so well with others. It is important that you can differentiate between the two. If you do not understand the users of the product then you aren't going to be able to understand whether or not the design matches their expectations.

Three areas must be covered to ensure testing is done to a high standard and will be suitable, effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. Having a good level of effectiveness and efficacy will support the users to achieve goals with accuracy and speed. Frequently this means that the product supports the user in a way that is better than the current method that the user is used to. If the product doesn't add value in any way which the user currently performs his/her tasks then they will have no use for the product.

Access

Microsoft access is the chosen application that will be used to create the database as well as the application that will be used to access, enter and manipulate the data. There are many versions of Microsoft access, but it's going to be created using version 2010 and made viewable via version 2007. Most of the recent access database applications use the same file format and work is a very similar way. This is important to ensure that the database will work on the most recent versions as well as slightly older versions.

Whilst Microsoft office is an application that is widely used and available it can also handle comprehensive single query language (SQL) as well as simple GUI based designs. I thought this be a good trait as it arguably caters for both types of users; every day and advanced users. I kept this in mind when looking for research resources, as I would need to find an access users handbook as well as a comprehensive coding manual.

The all in one reference book by Simpson et al (2007) explains from the very basic of tasks such as creating tables, forms and queries up to the advanced tasks such as code debugging and SQL queries which are tailored to Access 2007. Two of the authors also did a similar version of the book for Access 2010, including various bits of information from the first book that remain unchanged and also updating it to tailor for the new features in 2010.

The deliverable of the project; a database requires both reports and queries to make the system user friendly. Simpson et al (2007) uses easy to understand terminology on how to create both reports and queries that will be suitable to our database design.

One of the objectives of the project is for the database to be linked to the royal mail address database so that when address data is being entered you can enter a postcode and house number, it will query the royal mail database and return the full address; saving time and improving usability. One of the ways of being able to do this is possible through using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). VBA is a programming language that is bundled by default with all Microsoft software. Couch (2011) Explains in great detail how to use VBA in access 2007/2010 to achieve many custom tasks such as queries that aren't possible by using the default access features, linking to external libraries, database or API's on the web.

Although these reference books are useful for tasks associated with the application itself, such as how to do certain application specific functions. They do not help with the designing of the database despite the books touching on good design practice.

Security

Due to the fact that the database will contain customer information security must also be a high priority on the project list. There are too many instances where private customer data is stolen by hackers by exploiting extremely simple to fix problems. Making sure the database cannot be accessed without a password is a very basic must. Other security features can be adopted such as encrypted data so that should the database get compromised, or stolen the data inside the database will be encrypted. This of course doesn't stop the attacker from trying to crack the encryption password but it makes it much harder. Database security has become a hot topic in recent times (Morrison, 2003).

Morrison (2003) Believes that it is still very important to secure the database even if its not a public facing website and protected via a DMZ Firewall. Murray (2010) Also believes that the goal of a security administrator would be that only authenticated users perform authorized tasks on the database. Murray (2010) Recommends that security needs to address access control, application access, vulnerability, inference and auditing mechanisms.

Development Cycle

Requirements - Business/Technical System Options

Ashwood Nurseries requires a database system using Microsoft access that will allow them to create new customers and manage orders for new/existing customers. The system needs to combine three manual based systems into one to save time and make it easier to manage. The system needs to be able to store customers and orders relating to that customer, which both have unique numbers so that they can be found quickly should a customer call on the phone. Currently the paper based systems prove a bit tricky when someone phones in with a query, the customer has to be put on hold whilst searching through paper or using a slightly antiquated database system that is not fit for purpose. The new database should have a search feature that can search a number of different fields at the same time and should a value appear more than once within the tables then an option to scroll through the different values. If a unique ID is used then it will go directly to the order or customer in question.

BSO - Business system options

Item/Feature

Requirements

The degree of automation

Although the system does not need to be completely automatic, it will need some degree of automation. All of the forms need to have simple point and click functionality and the queries are setup ready to run. From that point of view the queries need to be automatic, they just need to run by pointing and clicking.

The boundary between the system and the users

The system will need to be a database system with a logical interface providing access to client's orders. It will need to provide staff a way of accessing client orders. Allowing them to create, modify and cancel orders. Queries that need to be run frequent will be stored in the system so that they can be run simply by double clicking the relevant query on the form.

The distribution of the system

All of the current data on the network is centralised, so the database will need to be stored in a remote location and then the client machines connect to the database to read and add information. Only two client machines will need access to the database and only one at any time writing data. Occasionally the other client machine will need read only access to the data.

Cost/benefit

As the software application has already been commissioned onto the machines that it will need to be access on the cost of the system would be £0, other than development costs which should also be £0 due to being a university project. There was a cost involved with implementing the Royal Mail Post Code search but due to its high cost it may be added at a later date.

Impact of the new system

The new system should save a huge amount of time, which should in turn have a huge impact. The system will hopefully save half the amount of time compared to current system. It will combine three processes into one.

Technical System Options

TSO - Technical system options

Item/Feature

Requirements

Hardware architectures

The office system is a Windows based system consisting of Windows Vista/Windows 7 and Microsoft Office 2007/2010. The database system will need to run on both of these.

Software to use

The database will need to be compatible with Access 2007 and Access 2010.

Cost of the implementation

The initial cost of implementation would be £400 a year, this is assuming just one server for the ordering, provisioning and hosting websites. It would need to be expanded very quickly as clients start to order services, the second server would cost £600 for the year, but this server would be capable of hosting on average a hundred websites.

Staffing required

The system should be scoped so that it can be accessed by two different members of staff. Only one will be writing to the database at any one time.

Physical limitations such as a space occupied by the system

The new system will not need to take any extra space than it already does. The system will not require any new hardware.

Distribution including any networks which that may require

All of the current data on the network is centralised, so the database will need to be stored in a remote location and then the client machines connect to the database to read and add information. Only two client machines will need access to the database and only one at any time writing data. Occasionally the other client machine will need read only access to the data.

Overall format of the human computer interface

The database needs to be designed in an easy to understand format by using forms and reports. All of the functions needed will need to be accessible via a button on a form.

Design

ERD - See appendix 1.1

Data Dictionary - See appendix 1.2

Form Designs - See appendix 1.3

The forms have been designed to a high standard using colors and styles that the individuals using the database are used to, using some aspects of the old database that are suitable or styles that the individuals are used to will give some comfort to the user whilst trying to learn and use a new system. The new system will not look in any way like the old system other than the colors and font styles used, this is done for a reason due to the old database not being fit for purpose. The new database would have to look different from the old database because it has been designed in a different way. It has been designed using a logical, structured approach that has a high level of usability.

The navigation has been made centralized so that all of the main forms, reports and queries can be accessed from within the one interface. There are no popup windows to confuse users about where they should go next and what window they need to be on to do the next task. All navigation is done from within the one interface; along the top of the navigation window are buttons to the sub-forms allowing the user to change to various different views. When you have clicked one of the buttons it changes color so the user knows which page they are on, giving the same sense that breadcrumbs would. We have used strong calls to action buttons within the navigation interface with large, bold and concise wording so that the user can anticipate exactly what button does what and where it is going to lead them. All of the tools that will be used frequently are in place within the interface and any lesser frequent tools can be placed within a submenu so that it doesn't clutter the interface. Where possible we have tried to use a logical structure for placing items, we have placed them where a user would 'expect' to find them e.g. saving and closing the database (although this is software specific, the use would still know where to find them).

Everyone makes errors, sometimes without knowing exactly what they have done. We have developed the system so that when any errors occur, the system displays an error message that is readable and understandable by the user. Not using complicated 'computing language' that the user is unable to understand. To make navigation easier for more competent users we have added keyboard shortcuts so that you can navigate to the orders window (ALT+O), products window (ALT+P) and order notes (ALT+N) this will save some time but only minimal. Speed is something that can stress some users out, if the database is slow to react to come commands then it can be frustrating. To speed up some of the processes we have indexed most of the common fields that would be used for searching. Fields that may contain common values such as the Cultivar and Genus, First/Last names fields have an auto lookup function so that it saves the user from typing out values that already exist in the database.

Moving between records is simple by using the arrows left and right towards the bottom of the form window, you can use the arrows in the standard view or when you have done a search and the search returns multiple results.

Report Designs - Appendix 1.4

The report designs follow the same layout as before, this is mainly due to Ashwood having dispatch notes pre-printed. The reports have been designed so that with a simple click of a button from a form the invoice will appear in a report which will have the delivery address, billing address, order details and a breakdown of the order including prices and totals. This can then be printed to fit the dispatch note that will then be used to create mailing labels for the parcels.

UNFINISHED

Query Designs - Appendix 1.5

Implementation

Testing

Maintenance

Justification of tools and techniques

Comparison of software algorithms

Access -

Show that you have thought of the alternatives along the way

Don't spend a lot of time evaluating the alternative DBMSs

At least acknowledge there are alternatives to Access.

Good argument is that it is easier for them to use, etc.

Oracle would be too expensive and difficult to administer.

MySQL & SQL Server too may be hard to administer, even though MySQL is free.

Evaluate them briefly from a usability angle - Access has the forms, etc to help you build the system,

Mention your experiences from using the Oracle Developer tools, which are not really aimed at the front-end applications.

Supporting Information

Academic Question Answer - Should not be a simple statement but a section(s) where all issues from the research, results from the artefact are considered. Justification for the answer from your research, artefact and supporting information.

Appendices to the Final Report

Do not forget you also need to submit your project management details - see assessment details.

- Entity Relationship Diagram

Untitled:Users:cj:Documents:Education:University:Project:ProjectERD.jpg

1.2 - Data Dictionary

tblCustomers

Field Name

Data Type

FieldSize

Validation

*CustID

AutoNumber

LongInteger

AutoNumber

*Title

Text

4

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*FirstName

Text

15

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*LastName

Text

15

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*Address Line 1

Text

40

Not Like "*[!a-z 1-9]*"

Address Line 2

Text

40

Not Like "*[!a-z 1-9]*"

*City

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*County

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*Country

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*Post Code

Text

8

Not Like "*[!a-z 0-9 ]*"

*Contact Number 1

Text

11

Not Like "*[!0-9 ]*"

Contact Number 2

Text

11

Not Like "*[!0-9 ]*"

E-Mail

Text

50

((Like "*?@?*.?*") And (Not Like "*[ ,;]*"))

Notes

Memo

N/A - Memo

None

tblProducts

Field Name

Data Type

FieldSize

Validation

*ProductID

AutoNumber

LongInteger

None

*Genus

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z ]*"

*Species

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z ]*"

Cultivar

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z ]*"

*Price

Currency

2 Decimal Places

None

tblOrderProducts

Field Name

Data Type

FieldSize

Validation

*OrderProductID

AutoNumber

LongInteger

None

*OrderID

Number

N/A

None

*ProductID

Number

N/A

None

*Quantity

Text

3

None

tblDelivery

Field Name

Data Type

FieldSize

Validation

*DeliveryID

AutoNumber

LongInteger

None

Method

Text

20

None

Price

Currency

2 Decimal Places

None

tblOrders

Field Name

Data Type

FieldSize

Validation

*OrderID

AutoNumber

LongInteger

None

*CustID

Number

LongInteger

None

*OrderDate

Date/Time

N/A

None

DispatchDate

Date/Time

N/A

None

TransactionRefNo

Text

10

None

AdditionalInfo

Memo

N/A

None

*DTitle

Text

4

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*DFirstName

Text

15

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*DLastName

Text

15

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*DAddress Line 1

Text

40

Not Like "*[!a-z 1-9]*"

DAddress Line 2

Text

40

Not Like "*[!a-z 1-9]*"

*DCity

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*DCounty

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*DCountry

Text

20

Not Like "*[!a-z]*"

*DPost Code

Text

8

Not Like "*[!a-z 0-9 ]*"

Notes

Memo

N/A

None

Delivery

Number

LongInteger

None

Order SubTotal

Currency

2 Decimal Places

None

Order Total

Currency

2 Decimal Places

None

1.3 - Form Designs

1.3.1 - Orders

Untitled:Users:cj:Desktop:Screen Shot 2013-04-28 at 11.39.50.png

1.3.2 - Order Products

Untitled:Users:cj:Desktop:Screen Shot 2013-04-28 at 11.43.01.png

1.3.3 - Order Notes

Untitled:Users:cj:Desktop:Screen Shot 2013-04-28 at 11.37.50.png

1.4 - Report Designs

Untitled:Users:cj:Desktop:Screen Shot 2013-04-29 at 10.44.43.png

1.5 - Query Designs

qryCustomers SQL

SELECT tblCustomers.CustID, tblCustomers.Title, tblCustomers.FirstName, tblCustomers.LastName, tblCustomers.[Address Line 1], tblCustomers.[Address Line 2], tblCustomers.City, tblCustomers.County, tblCustomers.Country, tblCustomers.[Post Code], tblCustomers.[Contact Number 1], tblCustomers.[Contact Number 2], tblCustomers.Notes, tblCustomers.Email, tblOrderProducts.OrderProductID, tblOrderProducts.OrderProductID, tblOrderProducts.Quantity, tblOrders.OrderID, tblOrders.OrderDate, tblOrders.DispatchDate, tblOrders.TransactionRefNo, tblOrders.AdditionalInfo, tblOrders.DTitle, tblOrders.DFirstName, tblOrders.DLastName, tblOrders.DAddrLine1, tblOrders.DAddrLine2, tblOrders.DCity, tblOrders.DCounty, tblOrders.DCountry, tblOrders.DPostCode, tblOrders.Delivery, tblOrders.[Order Subtotal], tblOrders.[Order Total], tblProducts.ProductID, tblProducts.Genus, tblProducts.Species, tblProducts.Cultivar, tblProducts.Price, tblDelivery.DeliveryID, tblDelivery.Method, tblDelivery.Price, [tblProducts].[Price]*[tblOrderProducts].[Quantity] AS Expr1

FROM tblDelivery INNER JOIN (tblProducts INNER JOIN ((tblCustomers INNER JOIN tblOrders ON tblCustomers.[CustID] = tblOrders.[CustID]) INNER JOIN tblOrderProducts ON tblOrders.[OrderID] = tblOrderProducts.[OrderID]) ON tblProducts.[ProductID] = tblOrderProducts.[ProductID]) ON tblDelivery.DeliveryID = tblOrders.Delivery;

InvoiceReport Query SQL

[qryCustomers Query]![CustID]=[Forms]![frmCustomers]![CustID] And [qryCustomers Query]![OrderID]=[Forms]![frmCustomers]![frmOrders Subform1]![OrderID]

frmCustomers Query SQL

SELECT tblCustomers.*, tblOrders.Delivery FROM tblCustomers INNER JOIN tblOrders ON tblCustomers.CustID = tblOrders.CustID;

frmOrderProducts SubForm Query SQL

SELECT [tblOrderProducts].[OrderProductID], [tblOrderProducts].[OrderID], [tblOrderProducts].[ProductID] AS tblOrderProducts_ProductID, [tblOrderProducts].[Quantity], [tblProducts].[ProductID] AS tblProducts_ProductID, [tblProducts].[Genus], [tblProducts].[Species], [tblProducts].[Cultivar], [tblProducts].[Price] FROM tblProducts INNER JOIN tblOrderProducts ON [tblProducts].[ProductID] =[tblOrderProducts].[ProductID];

Conclusions - including reference to the initial aims of the project and academic question.

Critical evaluation of the product - final report, software, findings, etc and process - planning, management, quality of sources found, etc. You should also include a section on Self reflection.

References and Bibliography

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