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To promote an understanding of the management of people within organisations by introducing key factors impacting on the structure and culture of organisations as well as the behaviour and attitudes of groups and individuals.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of this module students are expected to be able to:

Critically analyse concepts and theories relating to the study of people in organisations within an organisational, group and individual context.

Identify and make proposals to resolve people management problems at individual, group and organisational levels.

Exercise autonomy in the evaluation of group processes and characteristics, including leadership and teamworking, communication and managing diversity.

Critically evaluate the impact of occupational stress and conflict on people in organisation.

Recommended TEXTS

Arnold, J., Cooper, C. & Robertson, I. (2005), Work Psychology, Understanding Human Behaviour in the Workplace, 4th Edition, London, Financial Times, Pitman Publishing.

Huczynski, A. & Buchanan, D. (2004), Organisational Behaviour, 5th Edition, Financial Times, Prentice Hall Publishing.

Statt D, (2004) Psychology and the World of Work, 2nd Ed. London; Palgrave Macmillan

It is recommended that you buy ONE of these texts and use the library for further reference material.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

For those who wish to increase their knowledge and understanding of 'Managing People', there are various sources of additional information including the following:

Journals

Journals available from the Georgina Scott Library at Garthdee include:

British Journal of Management

Organisational Studies

Human Relations

Journal of Management Studies

Organisation

Equal Opportunities Review

Human Resource Management: International Digest

Human Resource Management Journal

Human Resource Management Review

IDS Studies

International Journal of Human Resource Management

People Management

Personnel Review

Personnel Today

In addition, some of the Internet databases such as Business Source Premiere, Emerald, Ingenta, & Science Direct can be useful for obtaining copies of journal articles and conducting literature surveys of topics for coursework preparation. Some of these databases require a password in order to use them; passwords can be obtained from the librarians.

Websites

www.cipd.co.uk - The website of the Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development. Contains recent research and examples of best practice. Restricted access available to non-members.

www.personneltoday.com - The website to accompany the weekly journal targeted at HRM professionals within the UK. Contains research, employment law updates and examples of best practice. Unrestricted access.

www.hrgateway.co.uk - A website for HR practitioners with examples of best practice and debate on current issues.

www.hrzone.co.uk - A website for HR practitioners with examples of best practice and debate on current issues.

www.hrmguide.co.uk/busconl.html - An online guide to HR websites and societies.

www.cbi.org.uk/home.html - The website of the Confederation of British Industry. Contains useful reports and links to HR related topics.

www.dti.gov.uk - The website of the Department of Trade & Industry. Contains useful reports and links to HR related topics.

www.economist.com - The website to accompany the weekly Economist journal. Contains reports on current management issues and often examines issues from an HR perspective. Restricted access available to non-subscribers.

LECTURING & TUTORIAL STAFF

Dr. David R. Jones: Module Coordinator d.r.jones@rgu.ac.uk Tel: 263034

Dr Mary Brown m.brown@rgu.ac.uk Tel: 263825

Moira Bailey m.m.bailey@rgu.ac.uk Tel :263139

TEACHING METHODS

10x2hr lectures

5x1hr group presentation seminars

2x1 hr taught/developmental seminars

5x1hr self-study presentation preparation sessions

LECTURE PROGRAMME

Aberdeen Business School

Dept. of Human Resource Management

Module Title:

Semester: 1

Stage(s): M

Ref No: BSM023

Scotcat Level: M

Scotcat Points: 15

ECTS Pts: 7.5

Module

Co-ordinator:

Dr. D. Jones

UNIVERSITY WEEK NO

LECTURER

TOPIC

Class meets Monday weeks 10-20

10

David Jones

Introduction to Managing People & Group Presentation/Report Writing Skills Development

Introduction to lecture programme

Changing nature of organisations

Nature and origins of work psychology

Coursework and assessment

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapters 1 & 2

11

Mary Brown

Impact of personality

What is personality?

Techniques for personality assessment in the workplace (e.g. 16PF, OPQ, Myers Briggs)

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 4, 5 *

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 5 *

Statt (2004) Chapter 9 *

12

Mary Brown

Perception of self and others

The perceptual process

Importance of perceptual judgements in business and people management

Principal errors in social perception e.g. selective perception, first impressions, implicit personality theory, stereotyping, halo/horns effect

Summary of main problems and suggested remedies

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 3

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 7

13

Mary Brown

Attitudes and beliefs

What attitudes are, how they are constructed, how they impact on people's lives and work

The concept of beliefs and how an individual's belief structure can affect their attitudes and self-perception

The relationship between attitudes and organisational culture

The factors to be considered when attempting to change attitudes

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 7

Statt (2004) Chapter 14

14

Mary Brown

Group behaviour & team-building

Concept of group

Personality and group performance

Different types of groups

Stages of group development

Concept and application of Belbin's Team Role Theory

Barriers to effective group performance &

techniques for improving group decision-making

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 12

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 9 - 11,12

Statt (2004) Chapter 7

15

David Jones

Leadership and management

The role of leadership in management

Different types of leadership

Trait theories; what are the characteristics of a good leader?

Style theories; is there a best leadership style?

Situational or Contingency theories; the appropriate style to fit the situation?

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 13

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 21

Statt (2004) Chapter 15

16

Moira Bailey

Work motivation

Psychological approaches to motivation

Need or content theories

Measuring motivation

Cognitive or Process theories

How theories can be applied in the workplace

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 9

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 8

Statt (2004) Chapter 13

17

Moira Bailey

Organisational stress

What is occupational stress? Costs to industry and society

Incidence of occupational stress/mental health problems in the workplace

Causes (stressors), effects, symptoms and buffering factors

Primary, secondary and tertiary interventions

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 11

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 5

Statt (2004) Chapter 5

18

Moira Bailey

Managing conflict

Sources and outcomes of conflict in organisations

Managing conflict through the use of policies and procedures using Discipline and Grievance Procedures as particular examples

Other interventions to manage conflict

Directed reading:

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 23

19

Moira Bailey

People and change

The people factors that influence the success or failure of change initiatives

Approaches to change, the phases of change management and their effective management

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 15

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 18

Statt (2004) Chapter 18

20

David Jones

Organisational culture and change

Introducing organisational culture

Analysing organisational culture

Culture change in organisations

Organisational culture and organisational effectiveness

Directed reading:

Arnold et al (2004) Chapter 15

Buchanan & Huczynski (2004) Chapter 19

Statt (2004) Chapter 18

SEMINAR SCHEDULE

Week

Seminar Schedule

10

Taught seminar - Getting to know you and choosing your presentation group members & topic theme

11

Self-study: presentation preparation

12

Self-study: presentation preparation

13

Taught seminar - Question & Answer around topic theme/presentation skills

14

Self-study: presentation preparation

15

Self-study: presentation preparation

16

Assessed Presentation Seminar 1: Coursework 1

17

Assessed Presentation Seminar 2: Coursework 1

18

Assessed Presentation Seminar 3: Coursework 1

19

Assessed Presentation Seminar 4: Coursework 1

20

Assessed Presentation Seminar 5: Coursework 1

Coursework 2 Submission Date - 11/01/08

The seminars supporting this module consist of a combination of taught seminars, presentation seminars and student-led preparatory sessions. Throughout the semester, students will work in self-selecting teams of 5 people to prepare for and facilitate an assessed presentation within a 1 hour tutorial group following the lecture.

Taught seminars will take place in Wk 10 and Wk 13, with a focus on developing existing presentation skills and to facilitate group involvement. Assessed presentation seminars will begin in Wk 16 and continue until Wk 20.

The 2nd taught seminar in Wk 13, is a question and answer session and is scheduled for the benefit of all students who require help in their presentation and/or presentation skills. Within weeks 11, 12, 14 & 15 the original room is booked for student groups to prepare for their presentations. It is important that students actively utilise this time and space to practice their presentation skills to each other. N.B. Tutors will not be present at these sessions.

SUMMARY OF MODULE ASSESSMENT

Assessment 1: Team written & oral presentation &

individual audience participation in presentations (a team & individual grade*)

Assessment 2: Individual Report (an individual grade)

Although, the approximate proportion of grades for both assessments is 50::50, the following module performance descriptor represents all the possible final grades calculated from the combination of grades of both assessments:

Coursework 2

Coursework 1

Grade

A

B

C

D

E

F

A

A

A

B

C

E

F

B

A

B

B

C

E

F

C

B

B

C

C

E

F

D

C

C

C

D

E

F

E

E

E

E

E

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

N.B. Students must pass both assessments to pass the module

Final Module Grade

Combination of grades for assessments 1 & 2

A

AA, AB, BA

B

AC, BB, BC, CA, CB

C

AD, BD, CC, CD, DA, DB, DC

D

DD

E

EA, EB, EC, ED, AE, BE, CE, DE,

F

FA, FB, FC, FD, FE, FF, AF, BF, CF, DF, EF, EE

N/S: Non-submission of report /attendance of presentation

Please see the chart below for an explanation of the grades.

Your grade is...

If your mark is...

A

6

B

5

C

4

D

3

E

2

F

1

*Teaching staff reserve the right to alter the Team Presentation marks awarded to specific individuals if there is no sufficient evidence of full participation and equal contribution within their respective group.

STUDENTS

Students will be expected to take an active role in the learning experiences of this module. As far as practicable this module offers you the opportunity to take responsibility for your own learning and growth - to the extent you consider appropriate.

Remember: All of us, both staff and students, are both teachers and learners.

Within the 1st assessment, students are asked to select their own presentation groups of 5 students. It is recommended that these groups, act as study groups, communicating regularly both face to face and virtual, as you are an important resource to each other in planning your presentation and preparing for the other presentations and lectures.

USING STUDY GROUPS TO INCREASE LEARNING

Some students find that the study group method, in general, helps to learn some kinds of material faster and better. Research indicates that many students improve their grades by supplementing individual study with group study. Other student have found they help them overcome shyness about discussing issues in class and help them become motivated to study, because you know your study group is depending upon your preparation

The following guidelines will help to plan and carry out the method in a way to ensure that it works for you.

An agenda should be prepared for each meeting, with each member responsible to report on or explain a section of the presentation or reading or to give the answers to selected questions.

Some groups begin their session by comparing lecture notes, research material etc.

All members must do their homework of preparing for the meeting, each preparing his/her assigned parts, and all making themselves familiar with all the material.

If your group begins to deteriorate into merely a social group, use a strict agenda and a strong chairperson. Or, simply ask, "Will that enhance our understanding of the subject?" when group members get off track.

Remember that effective study groups require that members develop skills in group work. If at first you don't succeed, discuss the problems with the group and try again.

COURSEWORK ASSIGNMENTS

The Robert Gordon University

Aberdeen Business School

Stage: M

Module Title : BSM023 Managing People: Assessment 1

Module Co-ordinator : Dr. David Jones/H414/263034/d.r.jones@rgu.ac.uk

Coursework Issued By : Dr. David Jones/H414/263034/d.r.jones@rgu.ac.uk

Module Learning Outcomes: 1, 2, 3 & 4

Coursework 1: Team presentation & Individual participation in tutorial group audience

Team-Led Written & Oral Presentation Seminars (refer to assessment grid for marking criteria)

Teams of 5 students are required to give a written and oral presentation including associated involvement/facilitation activities (see below), with the purpose of facilitating a critical analysis and discussion within the audience around one of the following ten Managing People statements. Balanced arguments in support and in opposition of the statement should be provided. Please note that each of the 10 statements reflect the respective 10 lecture topic themes in the module e.g. Statement 5 reflects the 5th lecture topic theme, leadership and management

1. Someone with an introvert personality will never be successful in a job which involves significant contact with the public.

2. Because our impressions of people are based on flawed perceptions, it's impossible to make accurate decisions about job applicants.

3. If someone is working in a customer care role, their attitude to the public doesn't matter as long as their behaviour suggests they like people.

4. When someone joins a group they lose their individuality and surrender to the 'group mind'. Consequently, people will do far worse things as a member of a group than they would as an individual.

5. Leadership success means understanding and managing one's own feelings & emotions and how they impact upon the feelings and emotions of others.

6. Don't pay any attention to all this hype about motivation - it's all just academic twaddle! People are motivated solely by money - managers just need to find out how much (or little) they have to give their staff to get them to do what they want them to do.

7. There's no such thing as stress - people just use stress as an excuse for being lazy.

8. Managers should positively encourage conflict within their organisations. Conflict encourages creativity and productivity.

9. When introducing change in an organisation, managers just need to tell their staff what is to happen and when - they much prefer it that way, it avoids any confusion.

10. A pluralist organisational culture always leads to organisational effectiveness.

N.B. Within the tutorial, each team will need to pick a different presentation topic theme (& its associated statement) so students are advised to pick their team and theme wisely within the initial taught seminar as presentation groups will need to collectively agree on and justify their reasons for choosing a particular theme to the wider tutorial group. In case of 2 groups wishing choose the same presentation theme, the wider tutorial group and tutor will make a collective decision based upon the most appropriate, rigorous and interesting justification. In summary, within the initial taught seminar, in consultation with the tutor, all student teams need to decide on their presentation groups, Managing People statement and the date of their presentation.

Presentation groups are initially required to e-mail their slide written power-point presentation prior to their oral presentation, to the respective tutor. This should include any handout sheets supporting the presentation - case studies etc. etc..

Students are then required to make a group oral presentation which should include the following 2 aspects in the order the students feel is the most effective to stimulate discussion and to facilitate learning:

team presentation on the topic statement - all students must take a turn to present (5-7 mins each) (approximately 30 minutes in total)

Appropriate group involvement techniques e.g. discussion of short case studies, completion of questionnaires, practical skills in developing performance appraisal, etc (group discussion and activities led by presenters for a minimum of 20 mins)

For example, out of a group of 5 students, the first 2 students may want to present their slides and then a questionnaire may be given out to the group to stimulate a discussion and then the other 3 students may want to present their slides and then a video could be shown, with some prior questions posed to the audience. Your aim is to spark an interest in the audience whilst being academically rigorous with your chosen slides and supportive activities.

Presenting students will have to work as a team to decide on the content of the individual presentations (to prevent duplication) and to decide how group participation will be fostered and maintained. Student presentation teams are encouraged to use the virtual campus and set up their own discussion groups. When preparing for the seminar, students are advised to consult the presentation guidance points (see below).

Individual Audience Participation and Attendance in Seminars (refer to assessment grid for marking criteria)

In order to ensure that all students learn about the topics within the module and provide useful feedback to the presenting team, attendance and full participation at each student presentation is essential, not only for the presenting team but for the wider tutorial group as a whole.

Therefore, attendance and quality of participation within the seminars which students are not presenting will be assessed on an individual basis by the tutor as part of the 1st assessment.

In order to prepare for this, during the weeks when they are not presenting, students must read and research around the relevant literature related to the topic statement of the upcoming presentation.

Within the presentations, individual student audience participation will primarily be assessed by the quantity and quality of input into the session e.g. questions showing a critical/thought provoking/rigorous insight into the presentation theme. Furthermore, any evidence of their preparation for the session - journal articles read, prepared written questions etc., will be gathered by the tutor.

Aberdeen Business School

Dept. of HRM

Managing People BSM023

Coursework Title: Team Presentation & Individual

participation

Student Matriculation No:

Coursework No: 1 50% weighting of total mark

Grade

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

N/S

Definition

EXCELLENT

Outstanding Performance

COMMENDABLE

Meritorious Performance

GOOD

Competent Performance

SATISFACTORY

Adequate Performance

THRESHOLD

Borderline FAIL

open to compensation

FAIL

(Weighting within c/w 1)

SOURCES OF ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

IN ALL CASES WITHIN THE LIMITS APPROPRIATE TO THE LEVEL OF STUDY ...

(40%)

WRITTEN team presentation

Interesting, accurate and highly critical theoretical and applied content which clearly addresses the required areas of the assignment.

Referencing clear, relevant and consistently accurate.

Effective use of excellent, well structured, quality visual aids.

Accurate content with much critical theoretical and applied content which clearly addresses the required areas of the assignment, .

Referencing clear, mostly relevant and accurate.

Visual aids are of good quality and used appropriately.

Content is mostly accurate, with reasonably critical theoretical and applied content which addresses the required areas of the assignment.

Minor inconsistencies and inaccuracies in referencing.

Visual aids are of adequate quality and structure.

Content is inaccurate in places, with minimal critical theoretical and applied which only just addresses the required areas of the assignment.

All required areas of the assignment are covered, but emphasis may lack balance.

Referencing present but with inconsistencies and inaccuracies.

Visual aids cover main points but may contain some errors.

Content is mostly inaccurate, with very little critical theoretical and applied content which addresses very few areas of the assignment.

Content contains a significant number of errors.

Very limited referencing including some inconsistencies and inaccuracies.

Visual aids may contain errors which detract from the presentation.

.

Content is inaccurate, with no critical theoretical and applied content which does not address the required areas of the assignment.

Content is imbalanced.

Referencing inaccurate or absent

Visual aids, if any, are basic and inaccurate

Minimal Effort

(30%)

oral team presentation

Introduction of all team members, topic and individual contribution stated.

Structure of the presentation clearly stated, logical and followed through.

Appropriate links between team members' individual contributions.

Appropriate use of transition statements between topic sections.

Strong evidence of planning and preparation.

Excellent contribution by all team members.

Obvious enthusiasm for the subject.

Key points are summarised in an appropriate conclusion.

Introduction of all team members and topic.

Structure of the presentation is mainly clear and logical.

Appropriate links between team members' individual contributions.

Appropriate use of transition statements between topic sections.

Clear evidence of planning and preparation.

Good contribution by all team members.

Presentation shows that team members are very interested in the topic.

An appropriate conclusion is provided.

Brief introduction.

Relatively clear and logical structure.

Evidence of planning and preparation.

Reasonable contribution by all team members.

Presentation shows that team members are interested in the topic.

A brief conclusion is provided.

Brief introduction

Structure is slightly unclear, but the presentation is reasonably logical.

Some evidence of planning and preparation.

Presentation does not appear to show a high level of interest in the topic.

A brief conclusion is provided.

No obvious introduction.

Structure is muddled, but main points of presentation may be ascertained/ inferred.

Limited evidence of planning and preparation.

The presentation content of team members may heavily overlap.

Presentation does appear to show that the team members are disinterested in the topic.

Inadequate conclusion.

Muddled structure.

No evidence of planning or preparation.

Significant overlap of presentation content between team members.

Significant portions of the presentation are incoherent.

Presentation clearly shows that team members display evidence of boredom with the topic.

Minimal Effort

(30%)

individual participation

Students consistently contribute to the presentations.

Students consistently add value to the critical nature of the presentations.

Students consistently influence the direction of the presentations.

Students consistently add value to the academic rigour of the presentations.

Students mostly contribute to the presentations.

Students mostly add value to the critical nature of the presentations.

Students mostly influence the direction of the presentations.

Students mostly add value to the academic rigour of the presentations.

Students reasonably contribute to the presentations.

Students reasonably add value to the critical nature of the presentations.

Students reasonably influence the direction of the presentations.

Students reasonably add value to the academic rigour of the presentations.

Students sufficiently contribute to the presentations.

Students sufficiently add value to the critical nature of the presentations.

Students sufficiently influence the direction of the presentations.

Students sufficiently add value to the academic rigour of the presentations.

Students make a limited contribution to the presentations.

Students add limited value to the critical nature of the presentations.

Students have a limited influence on the direction of the presentations

Students add limited value to the academic rigour of the presentations.

Students make no real contribution to the presentations.

Students add no real value to the critical nature of the presentations.

Students have no real influence on the direction of the presentations.

Students add no real value to the academic rigour of the presentations

Minimal Effort

Guidance: The shaded column represents that the different parts of the assessment with their relative % weighting for this coursework; running horizontally from this are the criteria (or evidence) (s)he seeks to award each grade. This is repeated for all the sources of assessment criteria. Each piece of work would then be assessed and the appropriate boxes ticked, which would then be aggregated to give an overall grade for the piece of work.

Indicative Grade Marker

Comments (See over)

Tutor's Role in the Presentation Seminars

The Tutor's role is to assess the team presentation and individual participation of the audience - s/he will not take part in the proceedings, other than to:

remind the class of the statement to be addressed and to ensure that the presenters are ready;

'time-keep' in order to ensure that each presentation keeps within the allocated time;

facilitate feedback from the group on the presenting team's performance;

feedback general points to the presenters on their performance. No marks will be available at this stage to allow for consistency and fairness across all the presenting groups.

Note: The tutor will not interfere in the structure of the presentations, presenters themselves will co-ordinate the sessions. If in doubt at any stage, you should turn to your team members for support and guidance.

GUIDANCE POINTS FOR PRESENTATIONS

Structure:

Opening statement:

Clear aim and objectives

Introduction of team members

Structure of whole:

Logical, clearly explained

Appropriate transition statements

between the presenters

Closing statement:

Summary of main points

Timing:

Appropriate timing and pace

Interaction with audience:

Eye contact

Not read verbatim

Transmits enthusiasm, creates interest

Clear, simple language

Appropriate visual aids that clearly help to get the points across

Content:

Relevant to question and accurate

Evidence of wide reading

Original thought and comment

GUIDANCE POINTS FOR SEMINAR INVOLVEMENT TECHNIQUES

Overall: Evidence of preparation and planned approach to leading group

(e.g., handouts, questionnaires, case studies etc)

Use of appropriate group involvement techniques

Equal contribution from all presenters

Discussion: Elicits participation from the whole seminar group

Ensures relevant, stimulating debate

Conclusion: Key points made during discussion are drawn together in a summary

Brief assessment of learning completed

Absence of Team Members

Any team members who are absent for their assessed presentation & seminar will be required to provide the tutor, with medical certification of absence or confirmation of details of absence. Absent students (with satisfactory certification of absence) will be required to deliver their individual presentation at a later date.

Note: Failure to deliver the presentation & seminar, at the appropriate time and place and without satisfactory certification of absence will result in a mark of zero being awarded.

The Robert Gordon University

Faculty of Management

Aberdeen Business School

Stage: M

Module Title : Managing People: Assessment 2

ModuleCo-ordinator : Dr David Jones/H414/263034/d.r.jones@rgu.ac.uk

Coursework Issued By : Dr David Jones/H414/263034/d.r.jones@rgu.ac.uk

Module Learning Outcomes: 1, 2, 3 & 4

Coursework 2 : Individual Report (refer to assessment grid for marking criteria)

The individual report is based on one of the following listed topic statements but it MUST be a different statement to the one that students have selected for their presentation seminar. All students from a particular presenting team must pick a different statement to each other.

1. Someone with an introvert personality will never be successful in a job which involves significant contact with the public.

2. Because our impressions of people are based on flawed perceptions, it's impossible to make accurate decisions about job applicants.

3. If someone is working in a customer care role, their attitude to the public doesn't matter as long as their behaviour suggests they like people.

4. When someone joins a group they lose their individuality and surrender to the 'group mind'. Consequently, people will do far worse things as a member of a group than they would as an individual.

5. Leadership success means understanding and managing one's own feelings & emotions and how they impact upon the feelings and emotions of others

6. Don't pay any attention to all this hype about motivation - it's all just academic twaddle! People are motivated solely by money - managers just need to find out how much (or little) they have to give their staff to get them to do what they want them to do.

7. There's no such thing as stress - people just use stress as an excuse for being lazy.

8. Managers should positively encourage conflict within their organisations. Conflict encourages creativity and productivity.

9. When introducing change in an organisation, managers just need to tell their staff what is to happen and when - they much prefer it that way, it avoids any confusion.

10. A pluralist organisational culture always leads to organisational effectiveness.

Presentation Format / Instructions

This work should be word-processed in double-line spacing and submitted as a formal report using 2000 words. You may use tables where the information you are providing lends itself to this type of presentation, and submit appendices; neither of these will be included in the word count but excessive use of appendices or inappropriate use of tables will be penalised. The report cover, title, executive summary, contents page and list of references are also not included within the word count.

Please Note:

Reports must conform to the presentation requirements detailed within 'The Guide to Report Writing'.

Report content must be supported by the use of appropriate academic references.

Referencing and citation format must follow the requirements detailed within 'The Guide to Report

Writing' and the library's 'Guide to Referencing.'

Criteria for Assessment

Repetition of academic theory will not attract a high grade. You should aim to identify relevant theories and use these to justify your answers to the questions posed. IN ALL CASES your answers must be applied to the chosen statement.

NOTE:

The penalty for late submission of a piece of coursework is that the coursework is failed. There is also a penalty for deviating substantially from the word length - a deduction of up to 1 grade point from final grade point for deviations in excess of +/- 10% of the specified word count.

You must include a statement on the front cover of your work that gives the word count. A disc copy of your work should be available on request, to enable the marker to verify the word count and to check for plagiarism.

If you, for genuine reasons, are unable to meet the hand in date, please complete an extension form and seek verification from your Course Leader.

The date for submission is by close of business on Friday, 11th January, 2008

Aberdeen Business School

Dept. of HRM

Managing People BSM023

Coursework Title: Individual Report

Student Matriculation No:

Coursework No: 2 50% weighting of total mark

Grade

6

5

4

3

2

1

N/S

Definition

EXCELLENT

Outstanding Performance

COMMENDABLE

Meritorious Performance

GOOD

Competent Performance

SATISFACTORY

Adequate Performance

THRESHOLD

Borderline FAIL

open to compensation

FAIL

(Weighting within c/w 2)

SOURCES OF ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

IN ALL CASES WITHIN THE LIMITS APPROPRIATE TO THE LEVEL OF STUDY ...

(30%)

Identification of balanced arguments

Has effectively identified (almost) all the arguments in support and in opposition to the statement with no erroneous inclusions.

Has included most of the anticipated arguments in support and in opposition to the statement

Has included at least two thirds of the anticipated arguments in support and in opposition to the statement perhaps focusing on one side of the arguments more than the other.

Has included half of the. arguments in support and in opposition to the statement perhaps focusing on one side of the argument much more than the other.

Has included minimal arguments in support and in opposition to the statement

Has included almost none of the anticipated arguments in support and in opposition to the statement.

Minimal Effort

(15%)

referencing

Referencing clear, relevant and consistently accurate. Appropriate number, all relevant.

Referencing relevant and mostly accurate. Appropriate number, most relevant

Minor inconsistencies and inaccuracies in referencing. Some shortfall in number, most relevant

Referencing present but had inconsistencies and inaccuracies. Some shortfall in number, more than half relevant

Very limited referencing including some inconsistencies and inaccuracies.

Referencing inaccurate or absent.

Minimal Effort

(15%)

Communication

& Presentation

Clarity of expression excellent, consistently accurate use of grammar and spelling with fluent professional/academic writing style.

Thoughts and ideas clearly expressed. Grammar and spelling accurate and language fluent.

Language mainly fluent. Grammar and spelling mainly accurate. Communication of thoughts and ideas beginning to be affected.

Meaning apparent in most instances, but language not always fluent, grammar and spelling poor/moderate.

Often ambiguous, leading to meaning being barely apparent. Language, grammar and spelling poor.

Purpose and meaning of assignment unclear. Language, grammar and spelling poor.

Minimal Effort

(15%)

application of arguments

Has effectively/correctly provided many, insightful workplace examples to support these arguments.

Has effectively/correctly provided sufficient workplace examples to support these arguments.

Has effectively/correctly provided some workplace examples to support these arguments.

Has effectively/correctly provided a few workplace examples to support these arguments perhaps with a lack of depth or only around one side of the argument

Very limited workplace examples to support these arguments.

No real workplace examples.

Minimal Effort

(25%)

critical ANALYSIS

Critical thought, evaluation and/or analysis within assignment rigorous and appropriate.

Good clear evidence of critical thought, evaluation and/or analysis carried out within assignment.

Critical thought, evaluation and/or analysis reasonably well carried out.

Some attempt at critical thought, evaluation and/or analysis within assignment.

Very limited attempt at critical thought, evaluation and/or analysis within assignment..

No attempt at critical thought/evaluation or analysis within assignment

Minimal Effort

Guidance: The shaded column represents that the different parts of the assessment with their relative % weighting for this coursework; running horizontally from this are the criteria (or evidence) (s)he seeks to award each grade. This is repeated for all the sources of assessment criteria. Each piece of work would then be assessed and the appropriate boxes ticked, which would then be aggregated to give an overall grade for the piece of work.

Indicative Grade Marker

Note: Failure to hand in the Report Document, at the appropriate time and place and without satisfactory certification of absence will result in a mark of zero being awarded.

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