Motivation Within The Workplace Commerce Essay

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During these trying times, it is really a challenge for managers to keep employee motivation at its peak… The same holds true for our organization…   Studies have attested that employees who are highly motivated give their optimal performance in their jobs.  In consideration of their findings, managers should always be in the know as far as motivation theories are concerned… Below is a short refresher article discussing Maslow, Alderfer and Herzberg's motivation theories…

What is motivation?

· According to Buchanan, motivation is a~ decision making process. The individual chooses the desired outcomes and sets in motion the behavior that is appropriate to achieve the desired outcomes.

Work Motivation

· The psychological forces that determine the direction of a person's behavior in an organization, a person's level of effort, and a person's level of persistence.

Why is Motivation important in businesses?

An organization's employees are its greatest assets. No matter how efficient your technology and equipment may be, it is no match for the effectiveness and efficiency of your staff.

Organizations with highly motivated employees enjoy the following advantages:

· Results to higher productivity

· Promotes better quality of work with less wastag

· Develops a greater sense of urgency

· Encourages more employee feedback and suggestion (motivated workers take more ownership of their work)

· Demands greater feedback from supervisors and management

THEORIES OF MOTIVATION

These theories specify the needs that people have and the way these needs contribute to motivation and job performance. These needs may be psychological and physiological in nature.

Needs Hierarchy Theory of Motivation

- Abraham Maslow

Background

· Abraham Maslow was dubbed as the Father of Humanist Psychology

· He based his theory on the idea that individuals work to satisfy human needs, such as food and complex psychological needs such as self-esteem. He coined the term Hierarchy of Needs to account for the roots of human motivation.

· According to Maslow, a fulfilled need did little to motivate an employee. For example, a person who has sufficient food to eat cannot be enticed to do something for a reward of food. In contrast, a person with an unfulfilled need can be persuaded to work to satisfy that need. Thus, a hungry person might work hard for food. Maslow called this the Deficit Principle.

Deficit Principle

· It is a person's unsatisfied needs that influence his behavior

· The unsatisfied need becomes a focal motivator.

· The satisfied need no longer influences an individual's behavior.

· Managers should be alert for unmet needs and then create rewards to satisfy them.

Progression Principle

· Higher order needs are not active motivators until lower order needs are fulfilled.

· Unfulfilled lower order needs take precedence over higher level needs. For example, for a person who is hungry, his need for food will far outweigh his need for self respect.

* Physiological Needs - needs required to sustain life such as: air, water), food, and sleep. According to this theory, if these needs are not satisfied, then an individual will surely be motivated to satisfy them. Higher order needs will not be recognized not unless one satisfies the needs that are basic to existence.

* Safety and Security - Once physiological needs are met, one's attention turns to safety and security in order to be free from the threat of physical and emotional harm. Such needs maybe fulfilled by: living in a safe area, medical insurance, job security, and financial reserves.

* Social Needs - Once lower level needs are met, higher level motivators awaken. The first of which are social needs. Social needs are those related to interaction with others and may include: friendship, belonging to a group, and giving and receiving love.

* Esteem Needs - After a person feels that he or she belongs, the urge to attain a degree of importance emerges. Esteem needs can be categorized as external motivators and internal motivators. Internally motivating esteem needs are those such as self-esteem, accomplishment, and self-respect. External esteem needs are those such as reputation, social status, and recognition.

* In later models, Maslow added another layer in between esteem and self-actualization needs: Need for Aesthetics and Knowledge

* Self-Actualization - is the summit of Maslow's motivation theory. It is about the quest for reaching one's full potential as a person. Self-actualized people tend to have motivators such as: truth, justice, wisdom, and meaning. They are said to have frequent occurrences of peak experiences, which are energized moments of profound happiness and harmony. According to Maslow, only a small percentage of the population reaches the level of self-actualization.

Applying Maslow's Needs Hierarchy - Business Management Implications

If Maslow's theory holds, there are some important implications for management. Managers have varied opportunities to motivate employees through management style, job designs, company events, and compensation packages. To pattern after Maslow's theory, management can do the following:

· Physiological Motivation: Provide ample breaks for lunch and recuperation. Devise a salary scheme that would allow your workers to buy life's essentials.

· Safety Needs: Employees cannot reach maximum effectiveness or efficiency when they feel the need to constantly check their backs and scan their surroundings for fear of potential threats.  Physical threats in the work environment can be alleviated by security guards, cameras, and responsive management personnel. Managers should also provide relative job security, retirement benefits, and the like.

· Social Needs: Generate a feeling of acceptance, belonging, and community by reinforcing team dynamics, planning team-based projects and social events.

· Esteem Motivators: Recognize achievements, assign important projects, and provide status to make employees feel valued and appreciated.

· Self-Actualization: Offer challenging and meaningful work assignments which enable innovation, creativity, and progress according to long-term goals. Provide opportunities that would allow your employees to reach their full career potential.

*Remember, everyone is not motivated by the same needs.  At various points in their lives and careers, various employees will be motivated by completely different needs. It is imperative that you recognize each employee's needs that are currently being pursued.

Maslow's Theory - Limitations and Criticism

Though Maslow's hierarchy makes sense intuitively, little evidence supports its strict hierarchy. Actually, recent research challenges the order imposed by Maslow's pyramid. As an example, in some cultures, social needs are regarded higher than any others. Further, Maslow's hierarchy fails to explain the "starving artist" scenario, in which the need for aesthetic supersedes physical needs. Additionally, little evidence suggests that people satisfy exclusively one motivating need at a time.

While scientific support fails to reinforce Maslow's hierarchy, his theory is very popular, being the introductory motivation theory for many students and managers, worldwide.

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ERG Theory of Motivation

- Clayton Alderfer

In 1969, Clayton Alderfer's revision of Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, called the ERG Theory appeared in The Psychological Review in an article titled "An Empirical Test of a New Theory of Human Need." Alderfer's contribution to organizational behavior was dubbed the ERG theory, and was created to align Maslow's motivation theory more closely with empirical research.

Alderfer distinguishes three categories of human needs that influence worker's behavior. These are existence, relatedness and growth.

· Existence Needs: physiological and safety needs such as hunger, thirst and sex.

· Relatedness Needs: social and external esteem involvement with family, friends, co-workers and employers.

· Growth Needs: internal esteem and self actualization the desire to be creative, productive and to complete meaningful tasks.

The ERG theory does not believe in levels of needs. A lower level need does not have to be gratified. This theory accounts for a variety of individual differences, which would cause a worker to satisfy their need at hand, whether or not a previous need has been satisfied. Hence, needs in the different ERG areas can be felt simultaneously.

ERG Theory recognizes that the importance of the three categories may vary for each individual. Managers must recognize that an employee has multiple needs that must be satisfied simultaneously. According to the ERG theory, if you focus exclusively on one need at a time, this will not effectively motivate.

The frustration-regression principle

In addition, the ERG theory acknowledges that if a higher level need remains unfulfilled, the person may regress towards lower level needs, which appear easier to satisfy. This is known as: the frustration-regression principle.

The two major motivational premises that the ERG theory gives are: the more lower-level needs are gratified, the more higher-level need satisfaction is desired; the less higher-level needs are gratified, the more lower-level need satisfaction is desired.

Applying Alderfer's ERG Theory - Business Management Implications

According to Alderfer, the frustration-regression principle has an impact on workplace motivation. For example, if growth opportunities are not offered to the employees, they may regress towards relatedness needs, and socialize more with co-workers. If management can recognize these conditions early, steps can be taken to satisfy the frustrated needs until the employees are able to pursue growth again.

TWO-FACTOR THEORY

- Frederick Herzberg

· Frederick Herzberg's theory of motivation is a content theory of motivation.  His theory attempts to explain the factors that motivate individuals by identifying and satisfying their individual needs, desires and the aims pursued to satisfy those desires.

· This motivation theory is referred to as a two factor theory because of the belief that motivators can be categorized as either hygiene factors or motivating factors.

· Hygiene factors are also often referred to as 'dissatisfiers'. They are concerned with factors associated with the job itself but are not directly a part of it. Typically, this is salary, although other factors which will often act as dissatisfiers include:

1. Perceived differences with others

2. job security

3. working conditions

4. The quality of management

5. organizational policy

6. Administration

7. Interpersonal relations.

· Motivators (sometimes called 'satisfiers') are those factors directly concerned with the satisfaction gained from a job, such as:

1. the sense of achievement and the intrinsic value obtained from the job itself

2. the level of recognition by both colleagues and management

3. the level of responsibility

4. opportunities for advancement and

5. the status provided.

Applying Herzberg's Two Factor Theory - Business Management Implications

The most important part of this theory of motivation is that the main motivating factors are not in the environment but in the intrinsic value and satisfaction gained from the job itself. It follows therefore that to motivate an individual, a job itself must be challenging, have scope for enrichment and be of interest to the jobholder. From this concept, Herzberg shaped his ideas about Job Enrichment, Job Enlargement, and Job Rotation.

As early as 1950 in the USA job rotation and job enlargement were being both advocated and tested as means for overcoming boredom at work.

For example, IBM introduced changes to machine operators' jobs to include machine setting and inspection. In addition they introduced other wide-ranging changes in both the production system and the role of foremen and supervisors.

It is less than clear just how successful changes of this type have been in practice. Often, workers expect higher payment to compensate for learning these other jobs and for agreeing to changes in working practices. The new jobs are often only a marginal improvement in terms of the degree of repetition, the skill demands and the level of responsibility; as a result workers have not always responded positively to such change. Job enlargement schemes may not be entirely feasible in some circumstances.

The concepts of both job rotation and enlargement do not have their basis in any psychological theory. However, the next generation of attempts to redesign jobs developed from the researches of Herzberg.

From his theory Herzberg, itemized a set of principles for the enrichment of jobs:

* removing some controls while retaining accountability;

* increasing personal accountability for work;

* assigning each worker a complete unit of work with a clear start and end point;

* granting additional authority and freedom to workers;

* making periodic reports directly available to workers rather than to supervisors only;

* the introduction of new and more difficult tasks into the job;

* encouraging the development of expertise by assigning individuals to specialized tasks.

Herzberg's other major contribution to the development of ideas in the area of job design was his checklist for implementation. This is a prescription for those seeking success in the enrichment of jobs:

* select those jobs where technical changes are possible without major expense;

* job satisfaction is low;

* performance improvement is likely with increases in motivation;

* hygiene is expensive;

* examine the jobs selected with the conviction that changes can be introduced;

* 'green light' or 'brainstorm' a list of possible changes;

* screen the list (red lighting) for hygiene suggestions and retain only ideas classed as motivators;

* remove the generalities from the list retaining only specific motivators;

* avoid employee involvement in the design process;

* set up a controlled experiment to measure the effects of the changes;

* anticipate an early decline in performance as workers get used to their new jobs.

Job enrichment, then, aims to create greater opportunities for individual achievement and recognition by expanding the task to increase not only variety but also responsibility and accountability. This can also include greater worker autonomy, increased task identity and greater direct contact with workers performing servicing tasks.

Herzberg's Theory - Limitations and Criticism

The focus of the approach is the individual job and only limited consideration is given to the wider context in which the job is carried out, particularly social groupings.

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Motivation in the Workplace: Maslow, Alderfer and Herzberg 

In these difficult times, it is really a problem for managers to keep staff motivation at its peak ...The same applies to our organization ... Studies have confirmed that employees who are highly motivated to give their best performance in their work. When considering their results, managers must always be aware of as regards theories of motivation ... Below is a brief article discussing Maslow retraining, Alderfer and Herzberg theories of motivation ... 

What is the motivation? 

• According to Buchanan, motivation ~ decision-making. The individual chooses the desired result and sets in motion the behavior necessary to achieve the desired results. 

Work motivation 

• psychological forces that determine the direction of human behavior in organizations, the level of human effort, and the level of individual perseverance. 

Why motivation is important in business? 

Employees of the organization are its greatest assets. Regardless of how efficient your technology and equipment may be, it does not match the efficiency and your employees. 

Organizations, highly motivated employees enjoy the following benefits: 

• Results in increased productivity 

• Contribute to improving the quality of work with less wastag 

• Develops greater sense of urgency 

• Encourages more Contact the employee and the proposal (motivated workers are taking more ownership of their work) 

• requires more feedback from the managers and management 

Theories of motivation 

These theories must be pointed out that the people and how these requirements contribute to the motivation and productivity. These requirements can be psychological and physiological nature. 

Hierarchy of needs theory of motivation 

- Abraham Maslow 

Background 

• Abraham Maslow was named as the "father of humanistic psychology 

• He bases his theory on the idea that people work to meet human needs such as food and complex psychological needs, such as self-esteem. He coined the term "hierarchy of needs to address the roots of human motivation. 

• According to Maslow, fulfilled the need little motivation of staff. For example, a person who has sufficient food may not be willing to do something for the reward of food. In contrast, individuals with the requisite might be persuaded to work to meet this need. Thus, a hungry person can work for food. Maslow called this the principle of scarcity. 

Lack Principle 

• This is the unmet human needs that affect their behavior 

• unmet needs becomes the focal motivator. 

• granted no longer affects human behavior. 

• Managers must be vigilant with regard to unmet needs and then create the awards for their satisfaction. 

Progression Principle 

• higher-order needs are not active motivators until lower order needs fulfilled. 

• Unfulfilled lower order needs have precedence over the needs of higher level. For example, for those who are hungry, his need for food will be far outweighed by his need for self-esteem. 

* Physiological needs - the needs necessary to sustain life, such as: air, water), food and sleep.According to this theory, if these needs are not met, the individual will certainly be motivated to satisfy them. Higher order need not be recognized unless one does not satisfy the needs that are basic to existence. 

* Security - Once physiological needs are met, one draws attention to safety and in order to be free from the threat of physical and psychological harm. Such requirements could be fulfilled: Life in the safe zone, health insurance, job security and financial reserves. 

* Implementation of social needs - needs only lower level of higher-level motivators to awaken.The first of which are social needs. Social needs related to the interaction with other people and may include: friendship, belonging to the group, and give and receive love. 

* Respect for the needs - when a person feels that he or she belongs, the desire to achieve a certain degree of importance comes out. Respect needs can be classified as external and internal motivators motivators. Internal motivation dignity of those needs such as self-esteem, achievement, and self-esteem. Requires external dignity of those such as reputation, social status and recognition. 

* In later models, Maslov added another layer between self-esteem and actualization needs: the need for aesthetics and knowledge 

* Self-realization - is meeting at the highest level of motivation theory of Maslow. It is about striving to achieve full potential as a person. Self-actualized people tend to motivators, such as: truth, justice, wisdom, and meaning. They say frequent peak experiences, which are energized moments of profound happiness and harmony. According to Maslow, only a small percentage of the population reaches the level of self-realization. 

Application of Maslow's hierarchy of needs - Business management implications 

If Maslow's theory is correct, there are some important implications for management. Managers have a variety of opportunities to motivate employees through management style, work projects, corporate events, and compensation packages. To pattern after the theory of Maslow, management can do the following: 

• Physiological Motivation: to provide sufficient breaks for lunch and recuperation. Develop a scheme of salary, which will allow your employees to buy the necessities of life. 

• Safety needs: employees can not achieve maximum efficiency and effectiveness when they feel the need to constantly check their backs and scan their surroundings for fear of potential threats. Physical threats in the workplace can be mitigated by security guards, cameras and responsive management staff. Managers must also ensure the relative safety, employment, pensions, and so forth. 

• Social needs: Generating a sense of acceptance, belonging, and community-building team dynamics, the planning team based projects and social activities. 

• Respect Motivators: recognition of achievements, assign important projects, and provide status for workers to feel valued and appreciated. 

• self-actualization: Offer challenging and meaningful work assignments that will allow innovation, creativity and progress in accordance with long-term goals. Provide opportunities that will enable your staff to reach their full potential careers. 

* Remember that not everyone was motivated by the same requirements. At different moments in their lives and careers, different employees will be motivated by completely different needs. It is essential that you recognize the needs of each employee, which is currently being studied. 

Maslow's Theory - Limitations and criticisms 

Although Maslow's hierarchy makes sense intuitively, little evidence supports its strict hierarchy. Indeed, a recent study challenges the order imposed by the pyramid Maslow. For example, in some cultures, social needs are higher than any other. Furthermore, Maslow's hierarchy does not explain the "starving artist" scenario, in which there is a need in the aesthetic replaces physical needs. In addition, little evidence suggests that people satisfy only one motivating the need simultaneously. 

Although the scientific support is not possible to strengthen the hierarchy of Maslow and his theory is very popular, being the introductory theory of motivation for many students and managers around the world. 

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ERG theory of motivation 

- Clayton Alderfer 

In 1969 Revision Clayton Alderfer's Hierarchy of needs Abraham Maslow called ERG theory appeared in Psychological Review in the article "An empirical test of a new theory of human needs." Alderfer contribution to organizational behavior was called ERG theory, and was created to align Maslow's theory of motivation to work more closely with empirical research. 

Alderfer distinguishes three categories of human needs that affect the behavior of the employee.This existence, kinship and growth. 

• Availability of needs: physiological needs and security such as hunger, thirst and sex. 

• Requirements cohesion: social and external dignity involved with family, friends, colleagues and employers. 

• needs of growth: internal self-esteem and actualization of the desire to be creative, productive and complete meaningful tasks. 

ERG theory does not believe in the levels of needs. Lower levels should not be satisfied. This theory accounts for the various individual differences that could lead the employee to meet their needs on the side, or no previous need was satisfied. Consequently, the need for different areas of ERG can be felt simultaneously. 

ERG theory acknowledges that the importance of these three categories may vary for each person. Managers must recognize that an employee has several requirements that must be met simultaneously. According to the theory of ERG, if you focus exclusively on one need at a time, it will not effectively motivate. 

Disappointments regression principle 

In addition, the ERG theory acknowledges that at a higher level need remains unfulfilled, the person may regress to a lower level needs that appear easier to satisfy. This is called: disappointment regression principle. 

Preferably two basic motivational space that gives the theory of ERG are: lower-level needs are satisfied, higher needs, lower level needs are satisfied, especially the lower level of satisfaction need to be desired. 

Application of Alderfer's ERG Theory - Business management implications 

According to Alderfer, disappointment regression principle impacts workplace motivation. For example, if growth opportunities are not available to employees, they may regress to relatedness needs, and communicate more with colleagues. If management can recognize these conditions early, steps can be taken to meet the needs of disappointed, yet employees are able to pursue growth again. 

Two-Factor Theory 

- Frederick Herzberg 

• Theory Frederick Herzberg's motivation content theories of motivation. His theory attempts to explain the factors that motivate people by identifying and meeting their individual needs, desires and the goals to meet these desires. 

• This motivation theory called the theory of two factors in the belief that motivators can be classified as either hygiene factors or motivational factors. 

• Hygiene factors are also often referred to as "dissatisfiers. They are related to factors associated with the work itself, but is not directly part of it. As a rule, salary, although other factors, which often serve as dissatisfiers include: 

1. The perceived differences with other 

2. Safety work 

3. conditions 

4. Quality Control 

5. organizational policy 

6. Administration 

7. Interpersonal relations. 

• Motivators (sometimes called "satisfiers") are those factors directly related to the satisfaction gained from work, such as: 

1. sense of pride and self-values obtained from the work itself 

2. level of recognition by both colleagues and management 

3. Level of responsibility 

4. opportunities for advancement and 

5. status provided. 

Application of two-factor theory of Herzberg - Business management implications 

The most important part of this theory is that motivation is not the main motivating factors in the environment, but the self-worth and satisfaction gained from the work itself. This implies that human motivation, the work itself must be complex, have the opportunity to enrich and of interest to the employee. With this concept, Herzberg form his ideas about the job enrichment, extension, and rotation. 

In 1950 in the U.S. job rotation and job enlargement were both advocated and tested as a means to overcome the boredom at work. 

For example, IBM made changes to the job of machine operators, to include setting machines and inspection. In addition, they presented other large-scale changes in the production system and the role of masters and overseers. 

This is less than clear how successful such changes have been in practice. Most workers expect higher wages to compensate for the training of other works, as well as negotiate changes in working practices. New jobs are often only a slight improvement in the degree of repetition, skill requirements and level of responsibility, resulting in workers are not always responded positively to such changes. Scheme of work of expansion can not be completely possible in some circumstances. 

Concepts and rotation and enlargement will not have basis in any psychological theory.However, the next generation of attempts to restructure work with the development of research Herzberg. 

From his theory of Herzberg, detailed set of principles for the enrichment of work: 

* Removing some controls while retaining accountability; 

* Increased personal responsibility for the work; 

* Assign each employee a full unit of work with a clear start and end point; 

* Providing additional powers and freedom of workers; 

* Provide periodic reports directly available to employees, not just for managers; 

* Introduction of new and more complex tasks in the work; 

* Promoting the development of knowledge through the appointment of individuals specialized tasks. 

Other major Herzberg's contribution to the development of ideas in the field of design work has been its list for implementation. This is a recipe for those seeking success in enriching activities: 

* Select those jobs where technical changes are possible without substantial costs; 

* Job satisfaction is low; 

* Increased productivity is likely to increase motivation; 

* Hygiene expensive; 

* Examine the work selected with the conviction that changes can be made; 

* 'Green light' or 'List Brainstorm' possible changes; 

* Display the list (red light), for the health proposals and to retain only the ideas, is classified as motivators; 

* Remove generalizations from the list leaving only the specific motivators; 

* Avoid participation of staff in the development process; 

* Create a controlled experiment to assess the impact of changes; 

* Early to predict the decline in activity as workers become accustomed to his new job. 

Enrichment, it is aimed at creating more opportunities for individual achievement and recognition by extending the task to increase not only different, but also responsibility and accountability. It may also include greater autonomy for the worker, increased task identity, and more direct contact with service workers who perform tasks. 

Herzberg's Theory - Limitations and criticisms 

The focus of this approach is the individual work and only limited attention is paid to the broader context in which work is done, in particular social groups.

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