Industry Analysis Of The Brewing Industry Commerce Essay

Published:

This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

The Brewing Industry is highly concentrated with the three largest breweries accounting for over 90% of the US market share. The key players in the Brewing industry would include Anheuser-Busch, SABMiller, and Molson-Coors (Hoover, 2010). These three brewers not only own one brand of beer but, as you can see they own several other brands as well. Anheuser-Busch owns Budweiser, Michelob, Busch, and O'Douls brands; while SABMiller owns Miller, Hamm's, Sparks, Ice House, Red Dog and SouthPaw brands; and Molson-Coors owns Coors, Blue Moon, George Killian's Irish Red lager, Keystone, and Zima brands. Each of these brands have a signified taste that is supposedly differentiates there product from the rest.

Brewers spend over half of their net revenues on the raw materials, such as agricultural and packaging inputs. The quality of these inputs are highly significant; the end product is strongly influenced by the nature of the ingredients used (Datamonitor, 2009).

Segments:

There are many different segments from geographical location to the distribution of beer to the different types of beer. Molson Coors Brewing Company segments their product by geographical location; each location produces their signature beer along with the major brands within the whole company. Where Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company segments their product by distribution, they have their domestic beer and their international beer.

Caveats:

Socio‐Economic

Relevant governmental or environmental factors:

The U.S. law prohibits restaurants, stores and individuals from buying directly from breweries. There is a required three-tier process in place to prevent alcohol abuse, and to ensure minors are not purchasing or consuming alcohol (Boeing, 2008).

Economic indicators relevant for the brewing industry:

Molson Coors Brewing Company and many other alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages are members of the Beverage Industry Environmental Roundtable (BIER). The BIER helps beverage companies to seek actions of social responsibility through water stewardship and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions (BusinessWire, 2010).

Porter's Five Forces

Threat of New Entrants

The barriers to enter this industry are high and continue to increase. The following elements will help determine the level of threat from new entrants.

Economies of scale

The brewing industry has high fixed costs which enable brewers to have high production capabilities and therefore achieving economies of scale. Which means large producers can earn enough revenue to spend significant amounts on branding, advertising, and other promotions to attract new customers and maintain customer loyalties (IBISWorld, 2010).

Proprietary product differences

Each brewing firm has their own process and formula for creating their beer. Coors uses a Rocky Mountain spring for their water and uses a special process of breaking down the starch for their Coors Light brand. They may not be the best kept secret but it's not easily accessible. Therefore, the barriers of entry are medium for product differences.

Absolute cost advantages

There are little legal constraints of the ingredients within the beers. However, there are patents for the processes in which they use to create new innovative brews. For example, Molson Coors has created a microcarbonated lager beer which is bewed based on an exclusive, revolutionary process that has a patent (Marketwire, 2009).

Brand identity

Brand recognition is a key success factor for brewing companies within this industry. Consumers of alcoholic beverages have a loyalty to particular brands. Therefore, this threat of entrant is high; coming into this industry will be very difficult and expensive because of the mass advertising that will be needed to get the recognition needed and the difficulty of capturing a portion of the market.

Access to distribution

The distribution of alcohol in America is highly regulated; producers are not allowed to act as wholesalers and are required to sell through licensed wholesalers (IBISWorld, 2010).

Suppliers

Suppliers in the brewing industry include the agricultural and packaging inputs. The agricultural inputs consist of malt, barley, hops and yeast; while the packaging inputs would include cans, bottles, and kegs.

Supplier concentration

As you can see with all that consist of agricultural and packaging inputs there are many more suppliers within the Brewing industry than firms, which causes the power of suppliers to decrease.

Presence of substitute inputs

Amongst the suppliers of the Brewing industry there are many forms of substitutes. For the agricultural inputs there are many different farmers, from corporate to independent, that grow various crops that can be made into beer. Therefore, brewing firms have a wide variety of choice between farmers. A substitution would be that the brewing firms setup their own farms and produce the crops themselves rather than buying a percentage of the crops from these original farmers.

In the packaging industry global warming is becoming more and more of a concern, creating the need to create biodegradable products. Therefore, a substitute for the packaging inputs would be a product that created from recycled plastic, aluminum, or glass or is biodegradable.

Since there are substitutes of suppliers within the brewing industry the power supplier's have will decrease.

Differentiation of inputs

Brewing companies differentiate themselves through packaging, for example Coors introduced the all-aluminum can in 1959. Since then Coors has sourced all of their cans from a captive can making facility that had grown to be largest in the world. Another time Coors differentiated themselves through suppliers was in 1984 when they started the first can recycling program, which used technology that was developed with Alusuisse, who is one of the world's largest aluminum company, by opening their own can recycling facility (HBS, 1992). Therefore, differentiation provides suppliers with an increase in power.

For the agricultural side of suppliers farmers can differentiate their crop by location, the climate provide crops with either more or less moisture than other locations. Another differentiation is the form of irrigation the farmers use or don't use.

Since the agricultural and packaging suppliers are able to differentiate themselves the power of suppliers will increase creating the industry more attractive.

Importance of volume to supplier

Suppliers of the Agricultural inputs produce various crops for the brewing industry and majority of those crops go straight to the brewers. However, independent farmers have several alternative markets they can enter, from animal feed to malted barley for distillation in the production of spirits to producing their own beer (Datamonitor, 2009).

Many of the major brewing firms brew and bottle their beer on company property, therefore the brewers own 100% of the total production of the suppliers output.

Therefore, there brewing industry buys a significant percentage of the total production of both the agricultural inputs and the packaging inputs, giving the brewing industry power over the suppliers.

Impact of inputs on our cost or ability to differentiate

In the brewing industry the costs of purchasing raw materials is the largest because of the significant role these ingredients produce. Malt that is used to make beer accounts for 70% of the total grains purchased by the industry. The malt's cost affects the total cost of goods sold and value added for American brewers (IBISWorld, 2010).

The inputs within this industry have a significant impact on the final product. The agricultural inputs provide the most important ingredient while the packaging inputs provide the resource that contains the brew that is distributed to their final customers.

The impacts the inputs have on the finished good is so great that it gives suppliers more power over the industry.

Threat of forward or backward integration

In the brewing industry the suppliers do not have access to the distribution channels. Therefore there is no forward integration which provides suppliers with less power. However, the brewing firms backward integrate by deciding how the suppliers package their product and the new technologies they use. This gives the brewing industry power over the suppliers.

Access to capital

Beer production requires substantial amounts of capital investment not only for the initial set-up costs but also the annual spending that can vary year to year. Investments requirements are at a high level of barrier to entry therefore the access to capital would be very difficult and unlikely.

Access to labor

A new brewing firm entering the beer market would have access to labor with the unemployment rate higher than it's ever been, it wouldn't be hard to find employees. However, access to the experienced workers may be more difficult because there are less of those. The brewing firm will need these experienced workers because of the knowledge they have of the system and the production of the industry.

Buyers

After the brewing firms purchase the ingredients from their suppliers and make the alcoholic beverage they sell the final product to wholesalers, bars, hotels, liquor stores, grocery stores and other retailers. This is because of the insulation of the three-tier distribution system which requires the brewery's to distribute their product to retailers or wholesalers who then will sell to restaurants, bars, and stores. The reason the three-tier system is to prevent consumption by underage consumers and alcohol-abuse.

Buyer concentration

Buyer concentration is low for many reasons including; distributors control no more than one percent of the American market share, the size of distributors is limited by heavy licensing requirements, restricted to small geographic areas, and employment size (IBISWorld, 2010).

Buyer switching costs

The switching costs would consist of cancelling the contract buyers have with the brewing company and creating a contract with the new brewing company.

Buyer Information

The buyers are well aware of the happenings within the brewing industry. Their performance and profitability coincide with the events occurring in the brewing industry (IBISWorld, 2010). This gives buyers increase power and protection from the brewing industry making competitive moves to increase their profit margins.

Threat of backward integration

Wholesalers are a crucial link it the marketing channel and that is why brewing firms influence the level of product promotion within the liquor wholesaling outlets in order to maximize market share and capture margins (IBISWorld, 2010).

Licensed wholesalers have a degree of market power since their numbers are controlled and it is more cost effective to deal with a limited number of manufacturers.

Pull through

During the recession as demand for beer slipped the large producers forced distributors and retailers to bear the brunt due to the uneven negotiating power accrued by holding 50% and 30% for the market (IBISWorld, 2010).

Brand identity of buyers

MillerCoors and Molson Coors Brewing Companies distribute their products to Innovative Beverage Group Holdings, Inc. in which then distributes the products to retail stores and wholesalers, like Imperial Beverage Company. The brewing companies would impact these companies' brand names by using their distribution channels and selling their beers through them. If customers see that this wholesaler or retailer sells Coors brands they will buy the beer from them.

Price sensitivity

Before the economic downturn in 2008 buyers weren't as concerned with the price of beer as they were soon after the downturn. As more and more wholesalers and restaurants began to struggle the purchase of brand named products dropped as well. Not only were these companies struggling but also their customers, as their wallets became smaller the more they went with the cheaper beers instead.

Price to total purchases

For wholesalers and retailers the brewing industry's products are a significant percentage of their total purchases. This gives the brewing industry more power and the buyers less power.

Substitute Products

For the brewing industry the threat of substitutes is high because of all the different forms of alcoholic beverages that are available. Majority of the alcoholic beverages excluding beer is much more attractive and appealing to consumers. The taste of beer is more of an acquired taste where other alcoholic beverages are not.

Relative price/performance relationship of substitutes

One of the major substitutions of beer is the wine and spirits industry. Wine is portrayed as more of a prestigious and intellectual beverage, which is why the costs of wine and spirits are so expensive. Therefore, while wine and spirits may be a major substitute it is also a costly alternative.

Buyer propensity to substitute

Wine consumption in the United States has nearly doubled in the last decade while beer sales have been stagnant, growing less than one percent since 2000 (Maloney, 2007).

Rivalry

Degree of concentration and balance among competitors

The Brewing Industry has high concentration with the market share being heavily consolidated by two companies, MillerCoors and AB InBev. MillerCoors is made of SABMiller and MolsonCoors Brewing Company to form a merger or joint venture to compete against the merger between Anheuser-Busch and the international beverage behemoth InBev, both of these mergers were formed in 2008. These two companies are responsible for four-fifths of all beer production within the United States (IBISWorld, 2010).

The brewing industry is heavily concentrated with Anuheuser-Busch InBev having over 50% of the market share while MillerCoors having 29% of the market share. Although, the industry is heavily concentrated it is not balanced because AB InBev has a much greater market share than MillerCoors making the industry more attractive and reduces the rivalry (IBISWorld, 2010).

Diversity among competitors

The Anheuser-Busch company operates through the following segments; domestic beer, international beer, packaging, and entertainment. The domestic beer division operates through the subsidiary ABI, which produces and distributes beer under the different US brand names. The international beer division operates through a wholly-owned subsidiary ABII, in which they negotiate and administer license and contract brewing agreements on behalf of Anheuser-Busch with various foreign brewers. Their packaging operations include several wholly-owned subsidiaries like Metal Container Corporation, Anheuser-Busch Recycling Corporation, Precision Printing and Packaging, and Eagle Packaging. The entertainment operations are also operated through a wholly-owned subsidiary, Busch Entertainment Corporation. BEC owns and operates nine theme parks including; Busch Gardens, Sea World, Sesame Place, Discovery Cove, and Adventure Island water park (Datamonitor, 2009).

MolsonCoors brewing company operates its business under three geographical segments Canada, the US and the UK. In Candad, the company is engaged in the production and sale of the Molson family of brands along with Coors light. There are six breweries in Canada which brew, bottle, package, market and distribute all owned and licensed brands sold in and exported from Canada. In the United States MolsonCoors Brewing company operates through the MillerCoors joint venture which is the second largest brewer with 29% of the market share. MillerCoors produces, markets, and sells a variety of brands in the US and Puerto Rico. MillerCoors sells its products to a national network of around 700 independent distributors that distribute the products to retail accounts. In the United Kingdom the company operates through Coors Brewers Limited (CBL), which is the second largest beer company in the UK with sales of 9 million US barrels in the year 2008 and holds a market share of 20% in the Western Europe beer market (GlobaData, 2010).

Industry growth rate (past and projected)

In the past five years the brewing industry's revenue has declined at an average annual rate of 0.3%, this in result of the recession and consumers switching to a cheaper beer. The industry revenue is expected increase by 1.1% in 2010, because beer is perceived to be more affordable than its alcoholic beverage competitors.

The brewing industry is projected to have an average annual growth rate of 1.3% through the next five years. As the economy as rebounding they feel beer sales will also rebound and customers will go back to the brand name beers.

Fixed costs to value added

The brewing industry is Mature with the slow technological change, marquee mergers, flagging growth rates and stagnant consumption. From 2008 to 2010 value added has increased by $90 million but has declined 0.4% from 2009 (IBISWorld, 2010).

Intermittent overcapacity

Anheuser-Busch and Miller ran 85% capacity utilization while Coors ran 92% capacity utilization in 1985 (HBS, 1992). Anheuser-Busch and Miller at this point were at normal capacity where Coors was over the normal range. Since, two out of the three major companies were at the normal range of capacity there was an increase in rivalry as firms attempted to maintain revenue.

Product differentiation

Brewers differentiate their product in three different ways; advertising, segmentation, and packaging. Advertising gave brewers the chance to introduce their product nationally. They did this by using media such as network TV and national magazines.

Segmentation gave brewers the chance to offer more than one type of beer; the market is segmented into five different beers brewery's make, a standard and premium lager, specialty beer, ales, stouts and bitters, and low to no alcohol. A standard lager has a 35.7% market share within the US and a 55.2% share within the Global market. The premium lager has a 34.2% market share in the US and 28.4% in the Global market. The specialty beer has a 26.5% market within the US and 10.4% in the Global market. Ales, Stouts and Bitters have a 2.8% in US and 4.2% globally. The low-alcohol content beer has a 0.7% market share in the US and 1.8% globally (Datamonitor, 2009). Along with those different basic types of beer brewery's offer they differentiate them by the color, flavor, strength, ingredients, production method, recipe, history, and origin of the beer (Boeing, 2008). Coors differentiates their product by using water from a fresh mountain spring in Golden, Colorado aging their beer for 70 days rather than 20 days.

Packaging is the third differentiation of brewing companies, for example Coors offered the first aluminum can in 1959 (HBS, 1992).

Growth of foreign competition

Imported brands present a strong competition to domestic producers with an increasing market share in the United States (IBISWorld, 2010). Anhueser-Busch joined ventures with InBev, Inc. making it the world's leading brewing firm with a 50% market share. This causes an increase in rivalry making the industry unattractive.

Exit barriers

It would be very difficult for a brewing company to exit this industry with the large assets of property, plant, and equipment which equates to over half of the overall assets (Boeing, 2008).

Conclusion

Critical Success Factors

Key Success Factors

Market Research

It's important for breweries to find geographic areas that will be profitable and successful in selling their products there (IBISWorld, 2010).

Economies of Scope

Breweries that produce a wide variety of brands can achieve a cost advantage over smaller competitors in distribution and advertising, since those two are important for the identity of a brand (IBISWorld, 2010).

Optimum Capacity Utilization

Effective utilization of capacity can minimize the producers cost of production. Unused capacity is costly, but may give the producer some strategic advantage (IBISWorld, 2010).

Control of Distribution

Market power in the industry's distribution networks are very high, so any potential entrant must have access to these to survive (IBISWorld, 2010).

Establishment of Brand Names

Successful branding through sales promotion and advertising is critical to success is a brand-competitive market (IBISWorld, 2010).

Economies of Scale

The size of the operation will determine unit prices, a key variable with respect to competitiveness (IBISWorld, 2010).

Prognosis

There are many factors within this industry that make it attractive for investors. First, product differentiation is important for investors because they don't want to invest in a product that is no different from any other product within the industry. However, product differentiation costs brewing firms a lot for advertisement and distribution making it less attractive. Second, the projected rate growth is to 1.3% which is appealing to investors, this gives them the knowledge that the industry will begin to turn around and grow exponentially in the next five years. Last, brand identity is important for investors when choosing a firm, it shows investors the product is well known and of great quality.

Part II: Firm Analysis (40 points)

Current Situation

Brief firm history

Adolf Coors immigrated to America around 1868 determined to establish his own brewery and beer with quality water. Adolph Coors and partner Jacob Shueler open their brewery in Golden, Colorado around 1873 with Rocky Mountain water. By 1893 Coors Beer wins an award at the Chicago world's fair. Then during WWII the Government gives Coors consent to buy supplies, half of the beer produced was reserved for the Military. When troops returned to America they craved the taste of Coors beer, causing demand to grow. By 1990 Coors becomes the third-largest brewer in America, and in 1991 Indiana is the last state to be added to Coors distribution list making Coors a nationwide product.

Coors produces several different kinds of beer and has acquired four firms that produce a different kind of beer. They have also joined ventures with Miller and acquired Molson, a Canadian company.

Strategic Posture

What is the current mission?

Molson Coors strives to be corporately responsible by being ethical and accountable in their business practices, making quality products that we advertise and sell responsibly, brewing and packaging their products with care for the environment, and supporting the development, engagement and wellness of their people and invest in the communities where they live and work.

What is the current (Porter's generic) strategy?

To move forward to become an international company, to drive change and deliver both revenue and profit growth, unlock the value of new markets, and accelerate to be the leading global brewer (PRNewswire, 2009).

External Environment (Opportunities and Threats) this section is a restatement of some of your industry analysis. You should restate your findings with respect to Coors.

Socio‐cultural

Molson Coors Brewing Company and many other alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages are members of the Beverage Industry Environmental Roundtable (BIER). The BIER helps beverage companies to seek actions of social responsibility through water stewardship and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions (BusinessWire, 2010).

Beer sales can be affected either positively or negatively when the perception of alcohol consumption is changed positively or negatively (IBISWorld, 2010).

Task Environment

The distribution of alcohol in America is highly regulated; also producers are not allowed to act as wholesalers (IBISWorld, 2010). This barrier to entry is an opportunity for Coors and other American brewers because of these regulations foreign brewers are put-off by these barriers while Coors and the other American brewers have a better chance of entering their markets.

A threat Coors will face is the rise in Input costs, malt and barley has more than doubled in the last two years. Aluminum has also increased in costs within the last two years, which accounts for 20% of the brewers' cost of goods sold (GlobalData, 2010).

Internal Environment (Strengths and Weaknesses)

Management

Board of Directors:

The Chairman, Peter Coors, and Vice-Chairman, Andrew Molson, of the Molson Coors Brewing Company Board of Directors are both apart of the initial companys.

What is the board size and composition

There are 13 board members, three of which are a part of one the initial families of the two Brewing firm and the rest are Executive leaders at different corporations like Wal-Mart, Imperial Tobacco Group, and Canadian Pacific Railway.

What are their skills?

They are of many skills from strong leadership skills to great financial experience. All of which are beneficial for the Board of Directors.

What is their level of involvement in the oversight of the corporation?

There is the Class A-C which are the original owners of Coors, Peter Coors and Melissa Coors Osborn. Then there is Class A-M which are the original owners of Molson Andrew Molson and Geoffery Molson. These two classes of A own 50% of the voting power, while the rest of the votes go to the other nine members.

Top Management (usually only the CEO):

What are top management's chief characteristics in terms of knowledge, skills, background, and management style?

Peter Swinburn is the Chief Executive Officer of Molson Coors Brewing Company. He has been in the industry for more than 34 years with an expertise in international market expanision. He has successfully established a worldwide brand presence for Molson Coors by growing brands and introducing Coors Light into several emerging markets.

Organizational Structure:

MolsonCoors brewing company operates its business under three geographical segments Canada, the US and the UK. In Candad, the company is engaged in the production and sale of the Molson family of brands along with Coors light. There are six breweries in Canada which brew, bottle, package, market and distribute all owned and licensed brands sold in and exported from Canada. In the United States MolsonCoors Brewing company operates through the MillerCoors joint venture which is the second largest brewer with 29% of the market share. MillerCoors produces, markets, and sells a variety of brands in the US and Puerto Rico. MillerCoors sells its products to a national network of around 700 independent distributors that distribute the products to retail accounts. In the United Kingdom the company operates through Coors Brewers Limited (CBL), which is the second largest beer company in the UK with sales of 9 million US barrels in the year 2008 and holds a market share of 20% in the Western Europe beer market (GlobaData, 2010).

Culture:

The companies shared beliefs would include their vision to live with integrity and respect, quality, excelling, creativity and passion.

Marketing

Product

Coors differentiates their product by using water from a fresh mountain spring in Golden, Colorado aging their beer for 70 days rather than 20 days.

Pricing

In the brewing industry pricing isn't as important as brand identity, Coors beers may not be of a competitive price but their brand identity and brand loyalty are strong enough to compete with the other leading brands.

Place (distribution system)

Coors main operations in the United States is in Colorado which is not necessarily accessible to the eastern markets, for that reason Coors built a plant in Virginia to distribute their products to the Eastern portion of the country while the Colorado plant distributes to the Central and Western portion if the country.

Promotional

Advertising in the brewing industry is very important because brand identity gives brewing firms the competitive advantage.

Operations/Production

Improvement of Productivity

The trend of capital spending varies each year with the level of investment being high. A way for Coors to improve their productivity and reduce capital spending would be to make their manufacturing plants energy efficient.

Product Development

Molson Coors Brewing Company is bringing Coors Light to new developing countries like Trinidad and Tobago.

Operating leverage

There has been an increase in fixed costs as well as input costs such as packaging material, distribution, and commodity.

Research and Development

Coors needs to know what portion of the nation or World that they are not reaching that could be a potential success. It's important for breweries to find geographic areas that will be profitable and successful in selling their products there (IBISWorld, 2010).

Finance

Molson Coors Brewing Company had a decrease 7.7 percent of income from the previous year. The Canada sales decreased by 3.2 percent in the third quarter versus last year, however, Coors Light has continued to show growth.

MillerCoors has had an increase of 28.1 percent of income compared to the pervious quarter. They are successfully delivering synergies, controlling costs, and managing revenues for sustainable profit growth, despite continuing commodity cost pressures.

Their domestic sales were down 1.3 percent due to slight decline in premium light volumes and continued softness in above primarily driven by lower retail sales. Although, their total net revenue has increased by 3.1 percent from the previous year which was driven by the domestic net pricing.

Management Information Systems

Not applicable.

Critical Success Factors

Market Research

It's important for breweries to find geographic areas that will be profitable and successful in selling their products there (IBISWorld, 2010).

Economies of Scope

Breweries that produce a wide variety of brands can achieve a cost advantage over smaller competitors in distribution and advertising, since those two are important for the identity of a brand (IBISWorld, 2010).

Optimum Capacity Utilization

Effective utilization of capacity can minimize the producers cost of production. Unused capacity is costly, but may give the producer some strategic advantage (IBISWorld, 2010).

Control of Distribution

Market power in the industry's distribution networks are very high, so any potential entrant must have access to these to survive (IBISWorld, 2010).

Establishment of Brand Names

Successful branding through sales promotion and advertising is critical to success is a brand-competitive market (IBISWorld, 2010).

Economies of Scale

The size of the operation will determine unit prices, a key variable with respect to competitiveness (IBISWorld, 2010).

Strategic Problem

Management has failed to ensure the long-term survival of Coors because their need to compete at the same level as Anheuser-Busch and InBev, Inc.

Strategic Alternatives and Recommendations

At the moment much of Coors growth has been with the joint venture with Miller and the acquisition of Molson. Molson gave Coors a large market share into the Canadian beer market as well as the expansion into other countries.

If Coors wants to compete with Anheuser-Busch they should put more effort into the CBL Company in the United Kingdom. It already has a 20% market share in Western Europe, now Coors can grow that market share as well as expand to Eastern Europe and Asia.

Implementation

In order to implement this plan of expanding to all of Europe and Asia, would to first strengthen it's market share in Western Europe and then create a promotion that would appeal to Eastern Europe and another for the Asia market. Along with those implementations also create a strong distribution channel new upcoming wholesalers throughout Europe. Although, Europe does not have the same governmental regulations as the United States it is still a great way of distribution.

Writing Services

Essay Writing
Service

Find out how the very best essay writing service can help you accomplish more and achieve higher marks today.

Assignment Writing Service

From complicated assignments to tricky tasks, our experts can tackle virtually any question thrown at them.

Dissertation Writing Service

A dissertation (also known as a thesis or research project) is probably the most important piece of work for any student! From full dissertations to individual chapters, we’re on hand to support you.

Coursework Writing Service

Our expert qualified writers can help you get your coursework right first time, every time.

Dissertation Proposal Service

The first step to completing a dissertation is to create a proposal that talks about what you wish to do. Our experts can design suitable methodologies - perfect to help you get started with a dissertation.

Report Writing
Service

Reports for any audience. Perfectly structured, professionally written, and tailored to suit your exact requirements.

Essay Skeleton Answer Service

If you’re just looking for some help to get started on an essay, our outline service provides you with a perfect essay plan.

Marking & Proofreading Service

Not sure if your work is hitting the mark? Struggling to get feedback from your lecturer? Our premium marking service was created just for you - get the feedback you deserve now.

Exam Revision
Service

Exams can be one of the most stressful experiences you’ll ever have! Revision is key, and we’re here to help. With custom created revision notes and exam answers, you’ll never feel underprepared again.