Steve Jobs

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Steve Jobs

Introduction

Meet with the $200-billion Steve Jobs supernatural anonymity extravaganza. Jobs, the wonderful are a person that everybody has come to meet with. It's not forever simple to coherent closely how Jobs is talented to exercise such strange supremacy over the customers thinking, but the commencement of the iPad delivered some of the lucid examples of his unrivaled, several may say spiritual, powers. It is visibly unspoken in business that though you may have the maximum creation in the earth it desires to be promoted fruitfully to pledge profitable achievement. Though the Apple has been documented as a pioneering creator of a variety of goods and services, it is their advanced to promotion that is the last, important element for accomplishment.

Over the few years, Jobs has guided Apple far further than its ancestry as a position actor in the computer bazaar, collecting to a diminutive but loyal cult of Mac heads, and addicted to the mind of accepted culture. The corporation proficient this by luminous design and manufacturing, as sound as a readiness to avoid approximately all of the systems that rule customary consumer electronics firm's like-Sony and Microsoft. Apple doesn't preoccupy about what patrons like. Similar to a corporation of mystics, it recognizes what we desired prior to we've yet had a possibility to appreciate it. And so Apple advertises us unbearably slim music players, polished white screens that don't seem a great deal like computers at all, handsets that act like additions of our brains, and software that conveys it mutually as one enormous joint practice.

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Despite all that, Apple's achievement depends greatly on the exclusive existence of its chief performer, Jobs. Nny magic show's fun part is letting people get swept up in the fantasy of it all and Jobs has handled to bring that intelligence of wonder to the globe of business. When Jobs is up on phase illuminating the newest device, he exercises all the utensils of a master magician: metaphoric embellishments, theatrical silence, and expressive looks to the addressees. Similarly, it demonstrates in the roughly alchemic way Jobs catches obtainable technologies and changes them from recognizable, useful gizmos into artistic icons and customer gold. Many of us have acquired into the Apple charisma, and this time we'll conduit almost US$50 billion into the firm's assets (Jones, 2008). Jobs's most audacious trick is the iPad, a slim multimedia tool about the volume of a journal and weigh up just 1.5 pounds. It's Apple's first new creation since flattering an global juggernaut with a stockpile market finances of US$200 billion (Jones, 2008) In the repercussion of the worldwide depression the iPad is also the first greater-gadget to be unconstrained. To stay shareholder happy, nobody undersized of a mega-hit will do. There are many who have hurried to say Jobs has unsuccessful to live up to his personal publicity this time. Early complaint from bloggers and geeks has typically alerted on what the new pill tool doesn't have. The iPad's tag, in the meantime, has turned into the bump of endless fun online. For a minute the word "iTampon" became the third-most discussed subject on Twitter (Jones, 2008).

Yet, most forecasters are forecasting Jobs has another victor on his hands. Young writes, "It won't occur over night, but in time, we consider that what looks today like a big iPhone or remove netbook will be exposed as a revolutionary new media tool," (Young, 2008). If Jobs can put the sugary spot between value and expediency for satisfied on the iPad, as he's completed in the past, Apple may just give happy supplier of all sizes the power to begin accusing for material that has become rapidly commoditized online-and make billions more for Apple in the procedure. Will it work? There are hundreds of causes to hesitation it, but all of that fell short to grab the true nature of Jobs's attraction and why we so liberally fall under his curse, time and again. When Apple is discovering, the customary rules of business get twisted in vital ways. Ladies and gentlemen, get prepared to open your pockets. The demonstration is about to start.

They name it the "reality buckle field," an imperceptible power that environs Steve Jobs and forces you to consider what he's saying. Certainly, it's unbelievable. But when longtime Apple devotees talk about this strength, they're only half-kidding (Barker, 2006). And Jobs-had it eccentricrd to overdrive for the iPad opening. Even before he paced from behind the screen, the murmur within the Yerba Buena middle was electric. For months, the medium had covered that some kind of tablet machine was approaching. More than 25,000 online narratives referenced such gossips in just three weeks taking up to the start (Barker, 2006). As Barker noted, "The final time there was great thrill about a tablet, it had some suggestions printed on it." (Barker, 2006)

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The paper briefly discusses about Steve Jobs as a successful leader of Apple Incorporations. In the study the main focus of the paper has been upon gathering data from secondary and primary sources. The paper analyzes the financial and market aspects of the company and how the success of the company will be sustained by Steve Jobs in the future.

Leader's philosophy

It's only been a couple weeks since Jobs's presentation, but most people already have a pretty firm idea of what an iPad can do. This in itself is truly remarkable and says a lot about the power of the Apple hype machine. After all, the device hasn't even gone on sale, and only a few hundred people on the planet have ever even seen the prototype in person, let alone touched it.

But for those whom Jobs has yet to reach, the easiest way to think of the iPad is as a large iPod Touch. Like its iAncestors, the iPad has a multi-touch screen, connects to the Internet through Wi-Fi and, for extra money, can connect to 3G mobile networks. Apple has said it will launch three models starting in March, ranging in size from, 16 gigabytes of memory up to 64 GB. Prices range from US$499 to US$699, plus $130 for the 3G option (Wilson, 2008). (Apple has yet to reveal the price tag for the iPad in Canada, nor which wireless carriers it will team up with here and how much data plans will cost.)

In core, Jobs was relating a hermetically preserved system, the middle basis of Apple's business model: If a client buys one Apple apparatus, she'll buy two, three, even four more--at a finest price relatively than reduce the skill with other products. In an age progressively more distinct by interoperability and technological teamwork, Jobs still declines to permit Apple's effective system. He won't hire music and videos taken from iTunes to be operated on other MP3 players. He won't authorize music downloaded from rival stores to have fun on the iPod )Young, 2008). And in implementing his restricted deal with AT&T for the iPhone, he went so extreme as to immobilize or "brick" the gadget of anybody who challenged "jailbreak" it for use with a new carter, or who downloaded third-party submissions for description Apple hadn't erect in. Today, there are an approximate 250,000 iPhones that haven't been addicted with AT&T, and even Apple's COO, Timothy Cook, suppose they have been wide opened and emotionally involved to another shipper. That means roughly 20% of iPhone clients want the hardware but not the bunged ecosystem built about it (Brashares, 2009).

Apple's annual revenues grew from $800 million to $8 billion. In 1984 alone, Apple's revenues grew 54 per cent to $1.5 billion (Owen, 2004). Such top-line success blinded Sculley and others to underlying problems as Apple suffered a relative loss of market position; the industry was rapidly coalescing around the WINTEL standard. During 1984 through 1993, Apple's computer sales grew 243 per cent from 1.4 million units to 3.3 million units. Unfortunately for Apple, the overall PC market grew 491 per cent from 6.3 million units to 31.0 million units during the same period (Owen, 2004). During Sculley's first full year, 1984, Apple commanded a competitive 21.7 per cent market share compared with 31.6 per cent for IBM and WINTEL compatibles (Owen, 2004). Slumping to just 6.2 per cent market share in 1989, Apple's market share staggered back to 10.7 per cent in 1993. By then, WINTEL had pushed aside all other technology platforms including the Macintosh and held 89.4 per cent market share (Owen, 2004). In 2001, the PC market reached 128 million units per year with 97.5 per cent being IBM-compatible and just 2.5 per cent Apple. (Owen, 2004)

Under Jobs, Apple has regained its footing, brought out the popular iPod music player and solidified its small computer market position through emphasis of its celebrated strengths of innovative industrial design and cutting-edge technology. On June 29 2007 Apple's reprise of the PDA, the iPhone, went on sale (Owen, 2004). In a May 2007 speech to his alma mater, Brown University, Sculley (now a venture capitalist) (Owen, 2004) admitted to his own management faults and offered this thought: “Real genius is seeing something that is totally obvious, maybe 20 years ahead of anybody else. Steve Jobs would be a real example of that. Steve saw where all of this was going long before any of this existed.

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It's only was a couple weeks since Jobs's presentation, but most people already have a pretty firm idea of what an iPad can do. This in itself is truly remarkable, and says a lot about the power of the Apple hype machine. After all, the device hasn't even gone on sale and only a few hundred people on the planet have ever even seen the prototype in person, let alone touched it. But for those whom Jobs has yet to reach, the easiest way to think of the iPad is as a large iPod Touch. Like its iAncestors, the iPad has a multi-touch screen, connects to the Internet through Wi-Fi and, for extra money, can connect to 3G mobile networks. Apple has said it will launch three models starting in March, ranging in size from, 16 gigabytes of memory up to 64 GB. Prices range from US$499 to US$699, plus $130 for the 3G option. Brashares, 2009). (Apple has yet to reveal the price tag for the iPad in Canada, nor which wireless carriers it will team up with here and how much data plans will cost.)

Just like the iPod launch in 2001 and the iPhone in 2007, people are using the word "magical" to describe Apple's new device. But the thing is, all magic is illusion, and so it is with all of Apple's biggest hits (Brashares, 2009). Other companies had already produced MP3 music players with the same capacity and sound quality by the time the iPod came along. Phone calls on the iPhone didn't sound any better than those on other phones (Brashares, 2009). (In fact, with AT&T, the exclusive carrier in the U.S., experiencing ongoing bandwidth problems and dropped calls, you could argue the quality was worse.) Sure, the iPod's spin wheel was pure genius, and the iPhone's interactive touch screen and the way it brought the Internet into the palm of your hand hit like bolts from the blue. But at their core, these devices are redesigns of existing technologies. Meanwhile, competitors like Samsung, Google and BlackBerry have since largely caught up to Apple in terms of functionality (Brashares, 2009).

The real magic of Apple's offerings has been the accompanying software and services the company offers. The iTunes online store makes it incredibly easy to purchase songs and load them onto the devices. Users have responded by buying well in excess of six billion songs, starting at 99$ a pop. By last quarter, Apple had sold roughly 250 million iPods around the world, giving it control of nearly 74% of the MP3 market (Brashares, 2009)... The company pulled off an encore performance with the App Store for the iPhone. In just 18 months, users have downloaded more than three billion apps-from simple programs that let you check on your flight status or tune a guitar, to more complex games and painting applications like Brushes, which has been used to create three New Yorker magazine covers. In both cases, it was the ease of access to music and apps that made the devices popular, not the other way around. (Brashares, 2009).

We're seeing the very same scenario play out with the iPad. Tablets are nothing new. Companies have been trying for years to make them work. Some, like the Apple Newton and Casio Zoomer, failed outright, while prototypes from Compaq and Microsoft never came to market. In 2001, former Microsoft GEO Bill Gates predicted that within five years tablets would be the most popular form of PC sold in America (Vaccaro, 2004). At the same time, Amazon, the online retailer, has already established a solid beachhead with its Kindle digital book reader. Yet the expectation once again is that Jobs will sprinkle his pixie dust on the sector and bring it new life.

This guarantees to be a happy holiday time for Steve Jobs and glowing Apple. Over the past year, the company's information have been dramatic: Sales are up 24%, earnings up 75%, limits topping 30%, stock cost up 146% (Wilson, 2008). The fame of the iPod and its flashy young cousin, the iPhone, has risen other Apple goods, helping boost market separation in personal computers in America from 2% a few years ago to 8% this past quarter, with Apple jump frogging Gateway to get third place after Dell and Hewlett-Packard (Wilson, 2008). The newest improvement to Apple's in service system--Leopard--is getting burly appraisals, in contrast to the apathy that unmeet Microsoft's new Vista OS. Apple's marketplace cap is now north of $160 billion; 18 months ago, the team in Cupertino, California, was value a mere $60 billion. This $100 billion augment alone identical the shared value of Motorola and Sprint-Nextel (Wilson, 2008).

Yet this is also an unsafe time for Apple. In a way the corporation has not at all seen, the barbarians are creating a mess. Main opponents with serious R&D and advertising funds are resting blockade to the House of Jobs. As Apple shifts into new souks, it has made strong new opponents, some working in performance. Nokia, for example, is knotting with telecom firms to suggest its personal touch-screen hardware in an attempt to swing subscribers from the iPhone and Apple's restricted associate, AT&T. MP3 companies from the likes of iRiver, Toshiba, SanDisk and Microsoft are getting slippery all the time, focusing the iPod at a portion of the price (Wilson, 2008).. Vivendi Universal scampers a long-term certifying deal to propose its melody on iTunes and is chatting with other music firms about structuring a download hoard of their own. Similarly, Amazon has shaped its own iTunes adversary, Wal-Mart has been low bonding its method into the market, and payment music websites such as Rhapsody are consuming tremendously to win customers over to huge Web-based music catalogs obtainable for a flat journal fee (Vaccaro, 2004). Even the tree huggers are pending after Apple, intimidating to go to court under a California consumer-protection law if sure supposedly poisonous chemicals aren't detached from the iPhone.

Gratitude of these intimidations has directed in some groups to suspicion about Apple as a store, which as of this writing drifts at $185 a split, near its all-time elevated. "In an ideal world, our computer sculpture would set Apple's supply at about $135," says Sculley, which position Apple in the "base 33%," mainly due to an "unappealing" market-to-book relative quantity and market assessment. "Apple is far new overestimated than Microsoft, Google or Intel." (Sculley, 2004) Sculley points out that Apple and Google are dealing at the same P/E relative amount, which has never done before. Apple has been proposed up in "outburst of enthusiasm over the 'mobile Internet,'" and its contributors have “taken advantage from an influential hype cycle." The firm's soaring assessment led the Jacob Internet Fund to cut its Apple location just to 1% of assets under organization from 2.5%. And Barrile, amazed about Apple's lasting scenario. (Barrile, 2007).While the firm's pace of novelty has been "hard to believe," its opponents are also getting enhanced. The iPod industry is growing. Apple stores are full for two years now. This might be the preceding holiday time of considerable year-to-year increase for the iPod." (Barrile, 2007).

Apple has used a range of media advertising to promote the products. Electronic, print, the Internet and alternative media (such as billboards and bus shelters) have all been used. Developed in the US by New York based advertising agency, Chiat Day, the advertisements became instantly recognisable through their consistent use of the little white headphones and cord (Vaccaro, 2004). Marketing is a comprehensive process that involves a range of activities designed to identify, anticipate and satisfy consumer needs. There are many memorable aspects of the marketing campaigns that have accompanied the most prominent of Apple products and services. Of course, the most recent marketing related to the iPod and its allied service, the iTunes library is of particular interest here. Let us examine the marketing of the iPod in relation to the traditional, but still relevant, 4Ps of the marketing mix: product, place, price and promotion (Barrile, 2007)...

Apple has effectively managed a marketing program that has combined the four key elements of the marketing mix: product, place, price and promotion. It has adapted its marketing strategy to the new business model where relevant, while still using techniques and strategies more relevant to the traditional model. (Of course the marketing of the related iTunes music library belongs very much to the new model). This effective marketing, combined with a culture of innovation and the leadership vision and drive of the CEO Steve Jobs goes a long way to explain why the company has sold over 42 million iPods since their introduction in 2001 and continues to gain in-roads into other markets such as desktop computers and online music sales (Barrile, 2007). This form of promotion is most relevant to the Apple exclusive and authorized retailers. Staffs are trained to have a high level of product knowledge and are completely focused on the sale of Apple's range. These sales people are in the best position to provide immediate and hands on promotion of a product that they clearly support. Successful personal selling can result in immediate sales.

Personal Response

Apple's traditionally tight grab on hardware, working system, and appliance suites, these groups often to the prohibiting of third-party "associates" (just ask Adobe), has led to a rather firm computing podium as contrast with the Windows substitute. But the ensuing lack of hardware, software, and tangential alternatives (again, versus Windows) has also previously moved as a market-share limit. Now, though, a serious mass of customers is bored with Windows. Apple hardware is faster, "battery-stingier," and more under budget than it's ever before, thereby producing a "perfect tempest" for the firm but one that'll overturn it if it's not cautious. Paranoia was possibly satisfactory when Apple retailed its goods to only a few-market-share-percentage aims worth of recurrent loyalists. Now, though, Apple is focusing a much big market of Windows adapts, who suppose Windows-reminiscent ecosystem range. These changes also wait for a more steady software knowledge than could be established in their Windows past, but they don't grasp that the two goals are mutually restricted. I hold roughly as greatly OS X-powered hardware as I do Windows-based gear, so I feel fit to remark that the snowstorm of frequently showing Apple-operating-system and application pieces is at least as important as that on the Windows part of the house, if not further so.

Conclusion

Jobs knew that the iMac could well save the company he'd founded way back in 1976 (he left a decade later, after a management shakeup)--but the new model was 12 months off (Uttal, 1985). Meanwhile, to let the world know Apple was not going away, Jobs needed a rallying cry--something to remind the core following of Apple's rebel spirit. The result: "Think different." The effort relaunched the Apple brand, but carried an equally important message: Steve was back. Visionary, iconoclastic and fearless, Steve Jobs the marketer is inseparable from Steve Jobs the personality. His inimitable blend of competitive skill and design savvy hasn't just saved a fading brand, its redefined two businesses that used to have nothing to do with computers: music and mobile phones. Over the past decade, Apple's iPod and iPhone have redefined popular culture, while signaling the company's return to its roots in innovation and just-plain coolness. (Jobs also increased Apple's market share in PCs from 3.8 to 10 percent.) (Sculley, 2004) Along the way, Apple got its advertising groove back as well. Work from TBWA\ Media Arts Lab underscored Apple's positioning as a top-end brand that believes its products are worth the extra money. Jobs knew that people who choose Apple over a cheaper competitor are saying something about themselves: That they, too, think different. The truth is we probably won't know for a couple of years whether Jobs will succeed in his next consumer revolution.

As fast-moving as the Internet age is, shifting consumer habits will still take time, no matter how cool Jobs makes the iPad out to be. But given his past performances, there's a very good chance Jobs will yet again redefine how we live our lives in the information era. "Steve Jobs is our generation's Thomas Edison, in that he's making our digital lives easier". "If you ever were to write Steve's epitaph, it would be that he made everything that used to be hard, really easy." (Sculley, 2004) Or, like any great illusionist, maybe he merely makes it look easy. The truth is that we probably won't know for a couple of years whether Jobs will succeed in his next consumer revolution. As fast-moving as the Internet age is, shifting consumer habits will still take time, no matter how cool Jobs makes the iPad out to be. But given his past performances, there's a very good chance Jobs will yet again redefine how we live our lives in the information era. "Steve Jobs is our generation's Thomas Edison, in that he's making our digital lives easier.

References

Barrile, Steve et al (2007) Business Management: VCE Units 1 and 2, Macmillan, Melbourne.

Barker, Garry (2006) ‘Faithful fervently greet Apple's new bride', The Age, 12 January.

Brashares, Ann. (2009) Steve Jobs: Think Different. Brookfield, CT: Twenty-first Century Books.

Butcher, Lee. (2007) Accidental Millionaire: The Rise and Fall of Steven Jobs at Apple Computer. New York: Paragon House.

Jones, Dylan (2008) iPod, therefore I am, Weiden field and Nicolson, London.

Owen W. Linzmayer. (2004). Apple Confidential 2.0: The Definitive History of the World's Most Colorful Company, No Starch Press.

Sculley, John. 2004. "Odyssey". Personal Computing, (December): 201-209.

Vaccaro, V. & Cohn, D. (2004) ‘The evolution of business models and marketing strategies in the music industry', The International Journal on Media Management, vol. 6, nos. 1 &2, Institute for Media and Communications Management, University of St. Gallen Switzerland.

Wilson, Suzan. (2008) Steve Jobs: Wizard of Apple Computer. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow,

Young, Jeffrey S. (2008) Steve Jobs: The Journey is the Reward. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman. Uttal, Bro. (1985). "The Adventures of Steve Jobs". Fortune, 14 (October): 119-124.