Proposal for Academic Programme of Youth Development Work

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Rationale For the Offer for the Programme

The Commonwealth Youth Programme Caribbean Centre (CYPPC) has provided a number of specialized training programmes for youth work practitioners in the region over the last 35 years. These programmes have been delivered in partnership with Ministries/Departments of Youth, the University of Guyana and the University of the West Indies. While there has been certification at the Certificate and Diploma levels CYPSS has also held a number of customized workshops for senior government officials, youth workers and youth leaders.

Recognising the need to further professionalise youth development work in the region CYPPC implemented its' enhanced Youth Work Education and Training strategy which included: The completion of Regional Competency Standards for Youth Development Work in June 2010. These standards were developed in partnership with Heart Trust NTA, young people themselves, Ministries/Departments of Youth, CARICOM, University of the West Indies and other stakeholders. These groups were used to inform the range of qualifications for youth workers, from certificate to post graduate qualifications, within the CARICOM regional qualifications framework and also provided a baseline for recruitment processes and drawing up job specifications.  

The Commonwealth Youth Programme Caribbean Centre (CYPPC) signed a Memorandum of Understanding in January 2010 with the University of Ghana and the University of the West, Open Campus? Indies to deliver self financing offerings of the Diploma in Youth Work. In March 2010, the Commonwealth Youth Programme Caribbean Centre initiated discussions with the University of Guyana, the University of the West Indies, and other duly accredited tertiary institutions to explore the possibilities for offering undergraduate and post graduate level training in youth development.

Initial discussion centered on the recognition of a youth worker category by the relevant state agencies in each member state; the development of a Code of Ethics for Youth Development Workers, facilitating the formation of national and regional associations of youth work practitioners.

In order to work optimally with young people, the intensive, complex and demanding nature of youth work requires youth workers to possess and demonstrate a high level of knowledge, skill and self-development. The demographic imperative- the vast and growing youth population - ensures that we pay attention to young people, not always for the right reasons, and sometimes for our own selfish ends, but we pay attention no less. Often, youth workers are perceived as those whose role it is to keep young people out of the way, provide recreation and fun for them and generally keep people off the streets. There is little understanding and even less appreciation that Youth Work is a distinctive field of practice and a highly demanding professional skill which carries with it considerable responsibilities and pressures (2001 presentation: Diploma Partners by Helen Jones and Cristal de Saldanha).

To often the youth education debate has been dominated by those who are already qualified and well-established in their chosen field, rather than the new generation of workers who have the right to influence future developments. Clearly, there is a debate to be had about how best to equip people with the skills, knowledge, recognition and status to acquire the necessary professional expertise and continue to be rooted in their own communities. However, it is also very important to consider how these people can be given transferable skills and knowledge, recognition and accreditation so that they have the freedom and ability to practice in other areas of the country. (Martin Notley for CYO, 1997)

Youth refers to the period marked by a range of changes occurring in the life of humans as they transition between middle adolescence and early childhood. The phrase is marked by intense physicalogical, sexual, and intellectual changes. It is imperative that this stage of life be managed effectively as environmental and social influences can severely impact the overall development of the adolescent and this un turn causes strain on the economic, social, and emotional well-being of society. Youth development is centered on building personal and social independence, knowledge of self and purpose and in developing in youth positive characteristics needed by his society.

The 2010 CARICOM Commission on Youth Development (CCYD) defines the term as the development stage that occurs between middle and adolence (14 to 15) and adulthood. It is difficult to determine when adolenscence ends and adulthood begins hence the term youth is used to refer to this stage of life. The definition of youth varies according to discipline and use, however, for the purpose of this paper and the programme, youth refers to persons between 15 and 24, which is the accepted definition of youth by the United Nations. The Caribbean has no regional definition for youth as there are variations within and among member states with regards to voting, age of majority and other legal adult milestones. The absence of a regional definition for youth makes it complicated to coordinate and intergrate regional policies and programmes. Nevertheless, it is accepted that there are challenges facing persons transitioning from adolence and adulthood and that there is a need for the developmental approach to meeting the demands of this specific .

 

Programme Needs Assessment

 

 

Programme Demand

 

 

Programme Aims and Objectives

 To develop in participants a measurable increase in their knowledge of youth development theories and approaches, methodologies and praxis

 

Programme Requirements

 

New entrants must meet the University's normal matriculation requirements in order to be accepted into the programme. In keeping with the work-based approach to this programme, new entrants must be employed in the field of XXXXXXXXXX. The first intake of participants to the B.Sc. Youth Development Work will be open to participants who have completed the Diploma in Youth Work and others who have met the minimum requirement for admission.

 

The minimum requirement for the programme requires that applicants have at least four (4) CXC or GCE O'level (including Mathematics and English Language) at grades 1-3 (grade 3 after 1998) or A-C respectively. Applicants, who do not meet the required entry level, may be accepted based on age and professional competence as well as any other considerations depending on their experiences and portfolio presented at an interview.

 

1.            CXC/GCE O/L - complete in 4yrs

2.            Mature entry: 23 yrs, at least three (3) years work experience at supervisory level - complete in 4yrs

3.            Applicants who have completed the Diploma - complete in 2yrs

Requirements for the Award of the Degree

 

In order to qualify for the award of the degree, in Youth Work, a learner must complete a minimum of 90 credits (normally equivalent to 30 three-credit courses), of which:

 

ï‚·       A minimum of 30 credits are from Level 1 courses and must include 9 credits of foundation courses.

 

ï‚·       A minimum of 60 credits are from level 2 and 3 courses.

 

Programme Delivery

 

The programme will be delivered online using a mix of guided online tutorials, discussion forums, and web conferencing led activities that are integrated with the participant's work-based experience.  Learners must have access to a computer with Internet access.  An online orientation to the Course Management System, Moodle, as well as the underlying philosophy of the programme will be conducted before the start of the programme.

Four of the proposed Level 1 courses and six of the available electives at Levels 3 and 3 of the programme are drawn from existing Open Campus Programmes.  These particular courses will be delivered in blended mode using a mix of online and face-to-face delivery methods we shown in Table 1 below:

 

Table 1: 

 

Courses to be delivered in Blended Mode

Course Code/Name

Delivery Mode

Level 1:

 

FOUN1301 - Law, Governance, Economy and Society

Online tutorials, Discussions forums, online coursework assessments, face-to-face final examination

MGMT1000 - Introduction to Computers

Online tutorials, Discussion forums, online coursework assessments, traditional face-to-face final examination

ECON1003 - Mathematics for Social Sciences

Online tutorials, Discussion forums, Six-hours of face-to-face tutorial sessions at local sites; online coursework components,  face-to-face mid-semester and final examination

FOUNXX History of the Caribbean

 

Level 2 Electives:

 

MGMT2021 - Business Law

Online tutorials, Discussion forums, online coursework assessments, traditional face-to-face final examination

MGMT2008 - Organizational Behaviour

Online tutorials, Discussion forums, online coursework assessments, traditional face-to-face final examination

EDLMXX21 Diversity Leadership and Management

 

MGMT3024  Business Communication

 

Level 3 Electives:

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment Structure

 

A model of continuous in-course assessment is proposed for the online component of courses to be offered in this programme.  The courses shown in Table 1 above are shared…….

 

Educational Resources

 

All course materials will be available to learners online for download.  Where reference texts are indicated, learners will be required to obtain using their own resources, via online book store purchase or hard copy purchases at UWI book stores.  Two copies of all such reference texts will be available as Site copies for loan at the respective Open Campus Site locations.

 

Quality Assurance for Course Delivery

 

In additional to course coordinators who are the main resource person for each course within the programme and provides both academic and administrative oversight for specific courses, an Open Campus Programme Coordinator will be responsible for management of the quality assurance aspect/component of courses within the programme. This will include monitoring of the content delivered in discussion forums to ensure there is a consistency with course and programme objectives, and that the quality of feedback on in-course assessments is meeting the learner's needs.  Networking with governmental agencies participating in the programme and liaison with regional security stakeholders to ensure authenticity of the work-based experience will inform quality assurance in the field.  Monitoring of Course Coordinator log activity in the Learning Exchange and feedback on assessment activity of Course Facilitators and timeliness of feedback on assessments will be undertaken by the Course Delivery Unit.  In this new programme, documentation of programme progress and outcomes, student course evaluations, feedback from learners, tutors and course coordinators will be used to assess the overall quality of delivery.

 

Proposed Programme Structure

 

The courses proposed under each option under which the BSc in Youth Development Work are as follows:

 

The courses proposed under each option are linked to the stated programme aims and objectives and are designed to reflect an understanding of the specific roles anchored by police and security officers in the regional setting.  These can be classified as………

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following are the proposed programme courses by levels:

B.Sc. Youth Development Work

A: General Education

B. Programme Courses

Level I: Youth Development Work (3 credits)

Social Psychology

Introduction to Computers

Foundation in Public Policy

Applied Math

Foundation 1001

Foundation 1301

Foundation 1101

Introduction to Law

Level II:

Research Methods

One Elective from the Following:

(3 options)

a.

b.

c. Abnormal Psychology

d.

e.

f.

Level III Courses

One Elective from the Following:

Course Descriptions

LEVEL I

FOUNDATION COURSES

FOUN1301 - Law, Governance, Economy and Society

FOUN1001 -

FOUN1101 -

LAW - Introduction to Law

LEVEL II

 

Proposed Budget

 

Estimated Cost to the Open Campus

 

2010/2011

 

A total of 7 Level 1 courses to be developed and 10 delivered (NB: 3 Courses are already developed).

2011/2012

 

A total of 10 Level 2courses to be developed and delivered.

2012/2013

 

A total of 10 Level 3 courses to be developed and delivered..

Requirement

Estimated Cost

Requirement

Estimated Cost

Requirement

Estimated Cost

Course Developers:

 

 

Course Developers:

 

 

Course Developers:

 

 

7 Course Writers for Level one courses

US$33,600.00 per course

 

10 Course Writers for Level 2 courses. Ongoing activity started in 2010/2011

US$48,000.00

 

10 Course Writers for Level 3 courses @ US$4,800.00 per course. Ongoing activity started in 2011/2012

US$ 48,00.00

Training of (a) Course Developers; (b) Course Coordinators/instructors; (c) Tutors:

 

Training of Course Developers:

 

Training of Course Developers:

 

2 facilitators US$ 250/day  @ 3 days per facilitator

 

(n=100 learners) = 1 CC and 4 Tutors for each course

 

 

42 Participants for training at average cost of US$150.00 per participant for travel, meals and materials

 

 

 

US$1,500.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

US$ 6,300.00

2 facilitators US$ 300/day  @ 3 days per facilitator

 

(n=100 learners) = 1 CC and 4 Tutors for each course

 

42 Participants for training at average cost of US$200.00 per participant for travel, meals and materials

 

US$1,800

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US$8,400

2 facilitators US$ 300/day  @ 3 days per facilitator

 

(n=100 learners) = 1 CC and 4 Tutors for each course

 

42 Participants for training at average cost of US$200.00 per participant for travel, meals and materials

 

US$1,800

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US$8,400

Peer Review of Courses

 

Peer Review of Courses

 

Peer Review of Courses

 

7 courses at US$750.00 per course

 

US$ 5,250.00

10 courses at US$750.00

US$ 7,500.00

10 courses at US$750.00 per course

US$ 7,500.00

Instructional Designer:

 

 

Instructional Designer:

 

 

Instructional Designer:

 

 

5 ID @ US$1,700.00 per course

 

 

US$8,500.00

 

 

 

5 ID @ US$1,700.00 per course

US$8,500.00

 

 

 

5 ID @ US$1,700.00 per course

US$8,500.00

 

 

 

 

US$55,150

 

US$74,200

 

US$74,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated Cost to Open Campus

 

Course Coordinator:

 

Course Coordinator:

 

Course Coordinator:

 

 

10 coordinators@ US$1,700.00 per course to be paid by the OC

 

US$  17,000

 

 

 

10 coordinators@ US$1,700.00 per course to be paid by the OC

 

 

 

US$  17,000

 

 

 

10 coordinators@ US$1,700.00 per course to be paid by the OC

 

 

 

 

US$  17,000

 

 

 

Tutors:

 

Tutors:

 

Tutors:

 

 

40 Tutors @ US$950.00 per course to be paid by the OC

 

 

US$38,000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40 Tutors @ US$950.00 per course to be paid by the OC

 

 

 

 

 

US$38,000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40 Tutors @ US$950.00 per course to be paid by the OC

 

 

US$38,000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instructional Designer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

CDS / ID - Development of 5 courses

US$8, 500

 

CDS / ID - Development of 5 courses

US$8, 500

 

CDS / ID - Development of 5 courses

US$8, 500

 

Practicum Supervisors:

 

Practicum Supervisors:

 

Practicum Supervisors:

 

Nil

-

Nil

 

US$250 per student (100 students)

US$25,000.00

 

Nil

-

5 supervisors @ US$950 per mentor/supervisor (20 learners per mentor)

US$   4,750.00

15 supervisors @ US$950 per mentor/supervisor (20 learners per mentor)

US$4,750.00

 

Online Training of Delivery Personnel:

 

Online Training of Delivery Personnel:

 

Online Training of Delivery Personnel:

 

1 Master Tutor at US$950.00 per tutor

US$    950.00

1 Master Tutor at US$950 per tutor

US$    950.00

1 Master Tutor at US$950.00 per tutor

US$    950.00

Educational Resources:

 

Educational Resources:

 

Educational Resources:

 

Reference Texts/Site Copies

US$   2,000.00

Reference Texts/Site Copies

US$   2,000.00

Reference Texts/Site Copies

US$   2,000.00

Repurposing of Open Source Course Content

US$   2,500.00

Nil

 

Nil

 

Programme Advertisement:

 

Programme Advertisement:

 

Programme Advertisement:

 

1 month of ads each  at September and January intakes 2 @ US$1000.00 per month

US$   2,000.00

1 month of ads each  at September and January intakes 2 @ US$1000.00 per month

US$   2,000.00

1 month of ads each  at September and January intakes 2 @ US$1000.00 per month

US$   2,000.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

US$ 72,650

 

US$

74, 2150

 

US$ 98,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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