Operations Management responsibilities

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Introduction
Aims

The aim of this report will be to show the possible impact that Operations Management could make to the management and administration of the day centre for children with learning disabilities.

Purpose

The purpose of the report is to deliver the findings of the working group investigation into the provision of day care services for people with learning disabilities within the Borough, drawing on the views of the day care services providers and users. As a result a number of The main purpose of the report is demonstrate how operations management can

Methodology

The primary focus of the research for this report was was carried out by looking at books. The research for the report was undertaken by consulting various embarked

Analysis Discussion Operations Management

Slack et al. (2007) defined operations management as “the activities, decisions and responsibilities of managing the production and delivery of products and services”. It is the core managerial discipline for all kinds of operations, from private sector through to public sector services. Service operations management is concerned with delivering a service to customers of users of a service. It involves understanding the needs of customers, managing the processes that delivers the services, insuring objectives are met, while striving for the continual improvement of services. Operation management is crucial to organisational function and critical for organisational success (Johnstone and Clark, 2008) Operation managers are concerned with planning, organizing, and controlling the activities that affect human behaviour through the service. (Appendix)

Operations management concern with the conversion of inputs into outputs, using physical resources, so as to provide the desired utilities to the customer while meeting the other organizational objectives of effectiveness, efficiency and adoptability. It distinguishes itself from other functions such as personnel, marketing, finance, etc., by its primary concern for ‘conversion by using. Operations management involves the systematic direction and control of the processes that transform resources (inputs) into finished goods or services for customers or clients (outputs). This transformation model applies equally in manufacturing and service organisations and in both the private and not-for-profit sectors. Generally an organization will aim reliably and consistently to achieve certain standards and operations manager will be influential in attempting to achieve these standards. Hence, this objective will influence the operations manager's decisions to achieve the required customer service. Part of this discipline is analytical: being able to formalise, measure and understand operational problems, such as congestion, under-capacity and failure. Part of it is constructive: being able to plan and design production and service processes. Therefore the task of operations management is to oversee design, the management of materials, planning and control, quality, people and technology.(See Appendix

Results /Findings Design Considerations

Operations management is concerned with the design, management, and improvement of the systems that create the organisation's goods or services. To design something, means to conceive the looks, arrangement of something before it is constructed, this means to envisage the general shape of something before getting down to defining the details. The design process is important to understand the design objectives, especially in the beginning when the overall shape and nature of the process is being decided. (Slack et al, 2007) Good design should satisfy service users, communicate the purpose of the service to the market it is aimed at. The objective of good service design is to satisfy service users needs and expectations. As the service design should start and end with the service user. (Slack et al, 2007)

In consideration to the design and planning of the proposed service, operations management would need to understand the nature, use and value of the service, what services would benefit the proposed service and how does it all come together and deliver the service to service users. (Slack et al, 2007) Please see Appendix for design considerations for proposed service . A recommendation for the planning and design of the proposed service would be for operations management to ask prospective service users and family members how they would like the service designed to fit around their needs. A piece of legislation that would enable operations management to consider the design and improvements of the service for service users with learning disabilities is ‘The Same As You? review' is the Scottish Government's strategy for learning disability services in Scotland. The review sets out the Scottish Government's wider policies of social inclusion, equality and fairness to enable changes to happen for the better in the lives of people with learning disabilities. The Same as You? identifies seven principles that operations management could integrate into planning and designing the proposed service.(see appendix)

Managing Quality Care Commission

The Regulation of Care (Scotland) Act 2001 has ensured a system of care regulation in Scotland. The purpose of the Act is to provide greater protection for people requiring care services. The National Care Commission is required by the Act to regulate and monitor care services. By registering and inspecting services against a set of National Care Standards. The standards outline the quality of service that care users have the right to expect. They have been developed with the purpose that the quality of care provided and received throughout Scotland will be consistent. The standards also ensure that all careservices will be measured against the general principles of Privacy; Choice; Safety; Realising Potential; Equality and Diversity.(NCSC, 2003) This ensures that all people are “safeguarded from physical, financial or material, psychological or sexual abuse, neglect, discriminatory, abuse or self-harm, inhuman or degrading treatment, through deliberate intent, negligence or ignorance.”(NCSC, 2003) If these standards are not being met, then people have the right to complain with no fear of victimisation or repercussion. As Marcia Ramsay, Director of Adult Services states “ We are tough on poor practice and use enforcement action when necessary, including closing some services. (As cited on Care Commission.com).

The proposed service will be registered with the Care Commission and will be inspected once a year. It is the job of the operations management to ensure that proposed service is up to the standards that are set in the National Care Standards.(appendix)

Managing human Issues

The Scottish Social Care Services Council

The Scottish Social Services Council is responsible for raising standards in the Scottish social service workforce. Their vision is for a competent, confident workforce, capable of delivering high quality services that has the confidence of the public and to put service users and carers are at the centre of everything they do. (SSSC,2009)

The Scottish Services Care Council has published a Code of Practice for Social Service Workers as a list of statements that describe the standards of professional conduct and practice required of social service workers in their job. (SSSC) Also included is The Code of Practice for Employers of Social Service Workers sets down the responsibilities of employers in the regulation of social service workers. The Code requires that employers adhere to the standards set out in their Code, support social service workers in meeting their Code and take appropriate action when workers do not meet expected standards of conduct. This will confirm the standards required in service provision and ensure that workers know standards of conduct. All staff in the care sector are now required to be registered with the Scottish Services Care Council and will be unable to work if they are not registered. (SSSC,2009)

Operations management would impact on management and administration in the proposed service as, as it would the operations management job to ensure that all future staff should be vetted in accordance with the Care Commission requirements, an enhanced disclosure check should be carried out and all staff are required to provide 2 references before obtaining employment at the centre, Scottish Social Service Council checks should be carried out. As The Scottish Social Services Council state in their code of practise “Checking criminal records, relevant registers and indexes and assessing whether people are capable of carrying out the duties of the job they have been selected for before confirming appointments” (SSSC,2009)

Operations management should also ensure that all future staff are suitable for entering the social service workforce by having the relevant qualifications needed for example support workers HNC level in Social Care/Special Needs. Reception desk HNC in Administration (please see Appendix and Appendix) Operations management need to ensure that all future employees understand their roles and responsibilities within the proposed service. Operations management should ensure that all employees have relevant training for proposed service first aid training, child protection training and food and hygiene, aswell as policies and procedures. Staff should also have training to enable them to undersatn the needs of people with learning disabilities.

Information Management and Governance

“Information can have great value as an organisational asset but can be a toxic liability if not handled properly”. (UK Information Commissioner's Annual Report 2007/08) Advances in technology have made it easier for organisations to collect personal data and provide more targeted services to their customers. However, these same advances may cause concern about privacy, especially regarding retention of personal information. (Müller, 2006). Whilst data breaches are rarely out of the headlines in the media, most of high-profile cases are not caused by hackers or thieves, but by bad business processes and policies.

Information governance is a critical component of corporate governance. All organisations whether public, private or third (not-for-profit) sector facean ever-increasing challenge of information governance. It is more than just ensuring information is secure. It is about how information is valued, created, stored, used and destroyed properly when not needed “Information Governance” is a framework, which allows organisations and individuals to ensure that personal information is dealt with legally, securely, efficiently and effectively, in order to deliver the best possible service. It brings together all of the requirements, standards and best practice that apply to the handling of information.

Operations management is accountable for the management of information at every level of the organization as “Information is a key resource that needs to be managed” (NISW 1996) Within the proposed service all information and data including staff records, (see appendix for full list of examples) and service users records (Appendix for examples ) will be contained in a filing system as well being stored on a computer system. Therefore it is the job of operations management to oversee that the information governance framework is adhered by through the Data Protection Act (2008) please see Appendix by making sure that administration and staff within the proposed service understand the legal implications of gathering, recording and releasing of information, confidentially and management of records, data protection, information security. For policies, information on data protection and information security for operations management see appendix

All different organisations will have different names their various functions within the organisation and have different set of support functions.

Some people (especially those professionally involved in operations management!) argue that operations management involves everything an organisation does. In this sense, every manager is an operations manager, since all managers are responsible for contributing to the activities required to create and deliver an organisation's goods or services. However, others argue that this definition is too wide, and that the operations function is about producing the right amount of a good or service, at the right time, of the right quality and at the right cost to meet customer requirements.

Working effectively with the other parts of an organisation is one of the most important responsibilities of operations management , therefore it is fundamental to the running of proposed service that and oversees all of these functions within the organisation and other management and administration

Operations management is responsible for all aspects in the operation of the proposed service the nature of the services provided, strategic planning of the day care services that will be provided, all the quality issues, human resources and how to implement good information and management governance. All these , Human resource management – the people employed by an organisation either work directly to create a good or service or provide support to those who do. People and the way they are managed are a key resource of all organisations Operations management is responsible for the inputs and outputs of an organisation

In operational management the feedback loop is essential to the organisation. As feedback information is used to control the operations system, by adjusting inputs through information from the customer can allow organisational management to achieve the desired outputs.

Operations management has its own set of problems in smaller organisations, larger organisations have the resources to dedicate tasks to individual within an organisation, but smaller organisations cannot, so individuals often have different jobs to carry out as the need arises. This informal structure allows the organisation to respond quickly to problems that arise, however decision making within the organisation can become Future Recommendations for proposed Service

Conclusion

All different organisations will have different names their various functions within the organisation and have different set of support functions.

Operations management is responsible for all aspects in the operation of the proposed service, the nature of the services provided, strategic planning of the day care services that will be provided, all the quality issues, human resources and how to implement good information and management governance

Operations management plays a big part in overseeing the proposed service. Working effectively with the other parts of an organisation is one of the most important responsibilities of operations management and oversees all of these functions within the organisation and other management and administration

References

National Care Standards Commission (2003) Care Commission. National Codes. Accessed on 25 April from http://www.carecommission.com

National Care Standards Commission (2003), "Adult Protection Protocol", Heather Wing. As cited in House of Commons. Health. Memorandum by Action on Elder Abuse (EA35) Accessed on 21 April 2010 from http://www.publications.parliament.uk.htm

Ramsay, M. Director of Adult Services. Statement from Care Commission on Panorama investigation on care at home services. Care Commission. Accessed on 25 April from http://www.carecommission.com

Scottish Social Services Council (2009) Codes of Practice Booklet.For Social Service Workers and Employers (September 09) Accessed on 21 April 2010 from http://www.sssc.uk.com

Bibliography

Allison, Michael. Strategic Planning for Nonprofit Organizations : A Practical Guide and Workbook (2nd Edition).

Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2005. p 1.

Monks,J,G (1996) Edition.Schaums outline of theory and problems of operations management. “2nd Edition. McGraw Hill Companies.USA
Coulshed, V. Mullendar, A (2001) Management In Social Work. (2nd ed) Palgrave Publishers.Hampshire.

Martin, V. Henderson, E. (2008) Managing In Health And Social Care. Routledge. Oxon:London

Appendix

Background

Since the launch of the Green Paper Every Child Matters in September 2003, there has been wide-ranging public debate about how to deliver improved care and services for children, young people and families. Following a consultation the Government published Every Child Matters: Next Steps and passed the Children Act 2004. DfES

In November 2004, Every Child Matters: Change for Children was released, setting out the national framework for local change programmes led by local authorities and their partners. In November 2005, the ‘Childcare Bill' was introduced to Parliament. DfES

The Every Child Matters agendawas further developed by the government through publication of the ‘Children's Plan' in December 2007. The Children's Plan is a ten-year strategy to improve educational outcomes for children and young people by basing services on the needs of the child. The aim is for all children, regardless of background or circumstances to have the support they need to be healthy, stay safe, enjoy and achieve, make a positive contribution and achieve economic well being, as well as reducing child poverty by 2020. (DfES 2004)

The Voluntary sector has a vital contribution to make at local levels in developing strategy and delivering improved care and services for children with learning disabilities and their families and are able to speak up on behalf of children with learning disabilities and their families. Voluntary and community organisations should be involved in all aspects of improving services. As part of this, they will need to ensure and demonstrate accountability, transparency, good practice and commitment to delivering high quality services for children with learning disabilities.

Appendix

Design

Design management can be defined as: the totality of the design activity, its administration and contribution to an organization's performance. It includes the organization and implementation of the process for developing new products and services. (BS 7000-3: 2006) Operations management is concerned with the design, management, and improvement of the systems that will create the organisation's services it will provide to service users within the proposed service. Materials management

Materials management is the function that is primarily concerned with how to aquire, control and use materials needed for the flow of goods and services connected with the production process. Monks (1996) states it is the planning, organizing and controlling of the flow of materials from their initial purchase, through internal operations, to the distribution of finished goods. The job of Operations Management is to determine how they will enable this process to produce goods in the form of services to the service users.

Planning and control

Quality

Quality, in a narrow sense, is a measure of the degree to which the product meets its design standards which may relate to materials, performance, relaiability, time or any quantifiable characteristic Monks (1996). And quality control is the use of statistical or other control activitiesto ensure that a good or service meets its proclaimed standards, which may relate to materials, performance, reliability, time or any quantifiable, objective and measurable characteristic Monks (1996)
It is a system that is used to maintain a desired level of quality in a product or service'. It is a systematic control of various factors that affect the quality of the product.

People

Human resources management is the organisational function with the responsibility for attracting, retaining and managing the people who make up an organisation. Human resources management is involved in the recruitment, selection, employment, and departure of employees from an organization. (Bogardus, 2004)

Technology

Strategy

Strategic planning is defined as “a systematic process through which an organization agrees on— and builds commitment among key stakeholders to— priorities that are essential to its mission and are responsive to the environment. Strategic planning guides the acquisition and allocation of resources to achieve these priorities”. (Allison 2005:1) see appendix for information on strategic planning.

Design considerations

When planning for the proposed service operations management will need to consider the following:

* Facility location: is the service located in area in that is accessible for people to reach. Traveling to the proposed service can be difficult for children/adults with learning disabilities. Therefore operations management would need to ask the question is there transport available near by that enables people to travel to location. I.E railway or bus station.

* Facility layout: operations management would need to make sure that rooms or areas where people will be within the proposed service are up to standard and can hold the required number of people who will be attending the service. Does the building have the facilities available to enable people with learning disabilities to use the service? Operations management would need to make sure that the facilities were available for people and provide them if absent.

* Product design: How will operations management deliver the service? What are people looking for from the service? What is the best way to deliver the service? Research other organizations that have run a similar service for learning disabilities. What were the strengths and weakness of the service?

* Process design: How will operations management make sure that everybody gets the service proposed. Are there any barriers that might stop people attending such as stairs that would people getting into building with a wheelchair.

* Scheduling: operations management would need make sure that the proposed service was open during suitable hours. Especially for people who have to travel far distances to reach the service. Bus and train could limit availability to service. Asking people which times would be suitable would be invaluable to setting up the service.

* Production planning: How will operations run the proposed service? Which services would people with learning disabilities like to be offered to cater for their needs? Asking people before setting up the service would enable operations management to supply the service, which suits the needs of people with learning disabilities. The Same as You review should be consulted and values implemented into service.

* Workers skills: Operations management would need to make sure that all the workforce had the necessary qualifications to work in the job they are applying for in the proposed service. All support workers should have an HNC in a relevant discipline for people with learning disabilities. All staff should be vetted by supplying references and should be registered with the SSSC. Staff should be given the necessary training to enable them to understand the needs of people with learning disabilities.

* Quality control: operations management should ensure that the level of service provided is in accordance with the National care standards. Does the service adhere to the national care standards principles of dignity, privacy, choice, safety, realising potential and equality and diversity?

* Time standards:

Wage Payment: Are the staff being paid the amount of wages suitable for their qualification level? Operations management need to make sure that

Forecasting: How long will the proposed service run for? Is there sufficient funding to allow the service to run for the recommended time? How will

Appendix Seven principles of ‘The Same You?'

We consulted widely during the course of the review on a number of principles, which we thought were central to helping people with learning disabilities lead full and active lives. Seven principles emerged and we have taken account of these in all our considerations and recommendations.

· People with learning disabilities should be valued. They should be asked and encouraged to contribute to the community they live in. They should not be picked on or treated differently from others.

· People with learning disabilities are individual people.

· People with learning disabilities should be asked about the services they need and be involved in making choices about what they want.

· People with learning disabilities should be helped and supported to do everything they are able to.

· People with learning disabilities should be able to use the same local services as everyone else, wherever possible.

· People with learning disabilities should benefit from specialist social, health and educational services.

* People with learning disabilities should have services, which take account of their age, abilities and other needs.

If the standards were not being fully met, the Care Commission would note this in the inspection report and require the service manager to address this. The Care Commission could impose an additional condition on the service's registration if the provider persistently, substantially or seriously failed to meet the standards or breached a regulation. If the provider does not then meet the condition, the Care Commission could issue an improvement notice detailing the required improvement to be made and the timescale for this. Alternatively, the Care Commission could move straight to an improvement notice. The Care Commission would move to cancel the registration of any service if the improvement notice does not achieve the desired result. In extreme cases (i.e. where there is serious risk to a person's life, health or wellbeing) the Care Commission could take immediate steps to cancel the registration of any service without issuing an improvement notice.

Nature of Services

“A service is an act or performance offered by one party to another. Although the process may be tied to a physical product, the performance is transitory, often intangible in nature, and does not normally result in ownership of any of the factors of production.” (Lovelock and Wirtz, 2004, 9). Please see appendix for a

A service has been defined by Kotler et al. (1986) as ‘any activity or benefit that oneparty can give to another that is essentially intangible and does not result in theownership of anything. Its production may or may not be tied to a physical product'.It has been more fully defined as:

Appendix

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT A Framework for Managing Operations Managing operations can be enclosed in a frame of general management function

PLANNING

Activities that establishes a course of action and guide future decision-making is planning. The operations manager defines the objectives for the operations subsystem of the organization, and the policies, and procedures for achieving the objectives. This stage includes clarifying the role and focus of operations in the organization's overall strategy. It also involves product planning, facility designing and using the conversion process.

ORGANIZING

Activities that establishes a structure of tasks and authority. Operation managers establish a structure of roles and the flow of information within the operations subsystem. They determine the activities required to achieve the goals and assign authority and responsibility for carrying them out.

CONTROLLING

Activities that assure the actual performance in accordance with planned performance. To ensure that the plans for the operations subsystems are accomplished, the operations manager must exercise control by measuring actual outputs and comparing them to planned operations management. Controlling costs, quality, and schedules are the important functions here.

BEHAVIOUR

Operation managers are concerned with how their efforts to plan, organize, and control affect human behaviour. They also want to know how the behaviour of subordinates can affect management's planning, organizing, and controlling actions. Their interest lies in decision-making behaviour.

MODELS

As operation managers plan, organise, and control the conversion process, they encounter many problems and must make many decisions. They can simplify their difficulties using models like aggregate planning models for examining how best to use existing capacity in short-term, break even analysis to identify break even volumes, linear programming and computer simulation for capacity utilisation, decision tree analysis for long-term capacity problem of facility expansion, simple median model for determining best locations of facilities etc.

Kumar, S. Anil. Production and Operations Management.

Daryaganj, Delhi, IND: New Age International, 2008. p 22.

http://site.ebrary.com/lib/abertay/Doc?id=10323373&ppg=22

Copyright � 2008. New Age International. All rights reserved.

Appendix
Strategic planning

Strategic planning is defined as “a systematic process through which an organization agrees on— and builds commitment among key stakeholders to— priorities that are essential to its mission and are responsive to the environment. Strategic planning guides the acquisition and allocation of resources to achieve these priorities”. (Allison 2005:1) see appendix for information on strategic planning.

Strategic planning is making choices. It is a process designed to support leaders in being intentional about their goals and methods. Simply stated, strategic planning is a management tool, and like any management tool, it is used for one purpose only— to help an organization do a better job. Strategic planning can help an organization focus its vision and priorities in response to a changing environment and ensure that members of the organization are working toward the same goals.

Strategic management is concerned with the character and direction of the enterprise as a whole. It is concerned with basic decisions about what the enterprise is now, and what it is to be in the future. It determines the purpose of the enterprise. It provides the framework for decisions about people, leadership, customers or clients, risk, finance, resources, products, systems, technologies, location, competition, and time. It determines what the enterprise should be capable of achieving, and what it will not choose to do. It will determine whether and how the organization will add value, and what form that added value should take. Strategic management is also concerned with management planning and decision-making for the medium to long-term future. It is concerned with the anticipation of that future, and with the establishment of a vision or view of how the enterprise should develop into the future that it must face. (Morden 2007)

Mission statement of busy bees

, Tony. Principles of Strategic Management.

Abingdon, Oxon, , GBR: Ashgate Publishing, Limited,. p 15.

http://site.ebrary.com/lib/abertay/Doc?id=10211298&ppg=26

Copyright � 2007. Ashgate Publishing, Limited. All rights reserved.

Appendix

Appendix

HM Inspectorate of Education (HMIE)
About Inspections

Primary Girl Reading

Each year, HM Inspectorate of Education (HMIE) inspects and reports on the quality of education in pre-school centres, primary schools, secondary schools, special schools, community learning and development services, colleges, and residential educational provision. We also inspect the education functions of local authorities and carry out joint inspections of services for children.

What are the principles of inspection?

Our inspections:

• assure the public about the quality of education provided;

• promote improvement and successful innovation; and

• contribute to the Scottish Government's measures for improvement in public services.

Inspection in the 21st Century

• Inspections and reviews are independent, rigorous, open and fair. They reassure learners and their parents and focus on how learners' needs and entitlements are being met.

• Inspections and reviews build on an establishment's self-evaluation, and we ask for little information in advance.

• Inspectors and reviewers gather first-hand evidence of learning and its outcomes.

• Inspections and reviews promote equality and positive attitudes to social and cultural diversity in all establishments and services that are inspected or reviewed.

• Inspections and reviews place a strong emphasis on supporting improvement and positive innovation.

• All inspections and reviews use questionnaires and face-to-face meetings that gather the views of learners, parents and staff.

• Inspectors take time to discuss staff's work and its context with them. They give close attention to what staff say and offer advice whenever possible.

• Inspection reports are concise and meet the requirements of parents and others to whom they are addressed.

Multi- sensory room

White Sensory Rooms

The Multi-Sensory room aids children's learning through the senses of touch, smell, sight and hearing, allowing them to explore through play and increase their dexterity.

Soft Playroom

Softplay environments

http://www.spacekraft.co.uk/softplay/more_information.asp

The first degree level qualifications for early years and child care professionals based on a new professional standard are expected to be available throughout Scotland by the autumn 2008. The new qualifications are the result of the Standard for Childhood Practice which was launched last year by Minister for Children and Early Years, Adam Ingram.

The subject benchmark describes how learners will achieve 360 credits and with an output at SCQF level 9. It is against this standard that new qualifications, known as Childhood Practice awards, will be developed. One aim of the standard is to allow early years and child care workers to follow courses with an appropriate balance of learning related to professional knowledge and understanding, skills and abilities, and values and personal commitment. It also establishes a professional framework for early years and child care workers. This is an important step in professional recognition. The three features of the standard inform the professional action that is required in the sector.

As a so The development of Childhood Practice awards are designed to put Scotland at the forefront of the development of integrated qualifications for early years and child care practitioners. Longer term, all early years and child care managers will be required to gain the new awards of 360 credits at SCQF level 9, for registration with the SSSC.

Evidence shows that the best experiences for children come from the best qualified staff, including where the manager has a degree level award.

The SSSC worked closely with key stakeholders to determine the standard. For example 78% of professionals who responded to Scottish Government consultation felt that Level 9 or higher, on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework was the correct level for managers in day care of children services. E

(SSSC)

Appendix
The Scottish Social Services Council

The Scottish Social Services Council is responsible for raising standards in the Scottish social service workforce. Their vision is for a competent, confident workforce, capable of delivering high quality services that has the confidence of the public and to put service users and carers are at the centre of everything they do.

Qualifications for support workers SSSC

Support workers are defined as workers who have delegated responsibility for providing care and support to children.

Workers in the ‘support worker' category must hold one of the following:

• SCOTEC Certificate in the Educational Care of Severely and Profoundly Mentally Handicapped Children

• SQA National Certificate Group Award: Early Education and Child Care (Higher)

• National Progression Award in Playwork and Child Care

• Scottish Progression Award; Children's Care and Play

• Scottish Progression Award in Playwork with the course Introducing Playwork (Skills Active)

• Scottish Progression Award in Playwork with the SQA unit Developing an Understanding of Working with Children: Workplace Experience (Higher)

• Professional Development Award – Support for Learning

• Professional Development Award – Classroom Assistant

• S/NVQ Level 2 Caring for Children and Young People Plus SQA unit Play in

Early Education and Child Care (Higher)with one of the following:

o SQA unit Child Development: An introduction

o SQA unit Child Development: Birth to Twelve Years (Higher)

• S/NVQ Level 3 Health and Social Care (Children and Young People) Plus

SQA unit Play in Early Education and Child Care (Higher) with one of the following:

o SQA unit Child Development: An introduction

o SQA unit Child Development: Birth to Twelve Years (Higher)

• S/NVQ Level 2 Early Years Care and Education

• S/NVQ Level 2 Childcare and Education

• S/NVQ Level 2 Playwork

• S/NVQ Level 2 Children's Care, Learning and Development (CCLD)

• S/NVQ Level 2 Classroom Assistant

• S/NVQ Level 3 Classroom Assistant

• Group of 21 credits from the range of SCOTVEC/SQA national certificate, child care units listed in list A (currently recognised for the purposes of preregistration with the Scottish Child Care Education Board)

• Any qualification as defined in the category “practitioner qualifications”

• Diploma in Social Work or equivalent

• A qualification meeting the registration requirements of the General

Teaching Council, Nursing and Midwifery Council, General Medical Council or the following professional groups regulated by the Health Professions Council:

o Occupational Therapists

o Art, Music and Drama Therapists

o Physiotherapists

o Speech and Language Therapists

• A qualification meeting the requirements for chartered registration with the British Psychological Society in the divisions listed in appendix 1

• OU Certificate in Early Years Practice

• OU Foundation Degree in Early Years/ Diploma of Higher Education in Early Years

• Level 1 of the OU Foundation Degree in Early Years (OU courses E100 (formerly E123+E124)+E115)

• Degree or Diploma in Curative Education

• Degree or Diploma in Community Education or equivalent, as recognised by the Standards Council for Community Learning and Development for Scotland Approvals Committee

• Certificate in the Residential Care of Children and Young People

• Senior Certificate in the Residential Care of Children and Young People

• BA Childhood or Early Childhood Studies

• BA (Hons) in Professional Studies (Playwork)

• Post Graduate Diploma in Play Therapy.

Appendix

Qualifications for manager/lead practitioner SSSC

The following information is only relevant to persons wishing to apply to register with the SSSC.

Managers/lead practitioners in day care of children services are defined as workers who hold responsibilities for the overall development, management and quality assurance of service provision including the supervision of staff and the management of resources. The term ‘manager' shall be taken to include ‘lead practitioner' as the responsibilities for both positions are the same. Workers in the ‘manager/lead practitioner' category must hold one of the following:

S/NVQ Level 4 in Children's Care, Learning and Development (CCLD) with the following optional units:

o DR4704 (CCLD 413) Develop and implement operational plans for your area of responsibility

o DR5904 (CCLD 416) Assess quality assurance schemes against agreed criteria

o DR6604 (CCLD 418) Co-ordinate and support the revision of policies, procedures and practice for registration and inspection

o DR7504 (CCLD 425) Provide leadership in your area of responsibility

• S/NVQ Level 4 in Early Years Care and Education (including playwork) with management strand

• S/NVQ Level 4 in Playwork to include optional units:

o Research, design and facilitate possibilities for self directed play

o Manage and develop play facilities and services

• A Diploma in Social Work or equivalent

• A qualification meeting the registration requirements of the General

Teaching Council, Nursing and Midwifery Council, General Medical Council or the following professional groups regulated by the Health Professions Council:

o Occupational Therapists

o Art, Music and Drama Therapists

o Physiotherapists

o Speech and Language Therapists

• A qualification meeting the requirements for chartered registration with the

British Psychological Society in the divisions listed in appendix 1

• Degree or Diploma in Community Education or equivalent, as recognised by

The Standards Council for Community Learning and Development for Scotland Approvals Committee

• OU Foundation Degree in Early Years/ Diploma of Higher Education in Early

Years.

OR

a qualification from the list deemed acceptable for Practitioners (see page 4) plus one of the following:

• PDA Child Care and Education

• Certificate in Early Education and Child Care (PDA Level 8)

• BA Childhood Studies or Early Childhood Studies or Childhood and Youth Studies

• Post Graduate Certificate or Post Graduate Diploma in Early Education

• Or a qualification which is certificated at or above SCQF Level 8 (minimum

60 credits) of management/leadership

• Registered Managers Award

• SVQ Leadership and Management for Care Services level 4.

Appendix

Full List Staff Records

* Application forms

* References

* Proof of identity, right to work and disclosure check.

* Health record at work

* Absences

* Complaints.

* Disciplines

* Supervision

* Training

* Copies of qualification.

Full list Service Users Records

* Personal history

* Family history

* Medical history

* Reports from other services/professionals

* Financial assessment

* Benefits information

* Care plans.

* Behaviour assessment

Appendix
Data Protection

The Data Protection Act gives individuals the right to know what information is held about them. It provides a framework to ensure that personal information is handled properly.

The Act works in two ways. Firstly, it states that anyone who processes personal information must comply with eight principles, which make sure that personal information is:

* Fairly and lawfully processed

* Processed for limited purposes

* Adequate, relevant and not excessive

* Accurate and up to date

* Not kept for longer than is necessary

* Processed in line with your rights

* Secure

* Not transferred to other countries without adequate protection

The second area covered by the Act provides individuals with important rights, including the right to find out what personal information is held on computer and most paper records.

Should an individual or organisation feel they're being denied access to personal information they're entitled to, or feel their information has not been handled according to the eight principles, they cancontact the Information Commissioner's Officefor help. Complaints are usually dealt with informally, but if this isn't possible, enforcement action can be taken.

http://www.ico.gov.uk/what_we_cover/data_protection/the_basics.aspx

Appendix What are Policies, Data Protection and Information Security?

POLICIES

Policies are processes and standards for management of information and data within an organisation. The Policy element of Information Governance is concerned with matters such as who owns information and is ‘responsible and accountable for' therefore operations management need to make sure that that the proposed service adheres to the Data Protection Act 1998 and operates an information security system.

DATA PROTECTION

The Data Protection Act makes clear demands upon organisations the terms of the security that must be applied to protect personal data. Any organisation or person who needs to store personal information must apply to register with the Information Commissioner. Data controllers must declare what information will be stored and how it will be used in advance. This is recorded in the register. The Freedom of Information Act now gives people the right to gives you the right to request information held by public authorities, companies wholly owned by public authorities in England, Wales and Northern Irelandand non-devolved public bodies in Scotland.

INFORMATION SECURITY

Information Governance will help ensure that all employees comply with law and best practice when handling personal information. Training and development is a vital component of Information Governance. With proper training employees will be able to ensure that service user information rights are respected and their personal information is used appropriately and legally

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