An introduction to managing the change process

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The world is changing rapidly. The assumptions that many individuals and societies made on the nature of their jobs and employment, only a generation ago, have now lapsed.

In an increasingly globalized economy, international trade in services and products is growing rapidly. Large corporations increasingly operate as Label instead of a single country. Neoliberal economic thinking led to an international agenda that gives prominence to the liberalization and economic privatization. All this has brought major disruption key sectors of the economy.

The way work is done is changing. The jobs no longer serve for life. Careers and do not develop in a linear progression reassuring upward. The old hierarchical structures of work, going back to the approaches of "scientific management" of the early twentieth century, have been put into question and in some cases dismantled. Companies adopt new management styles.

Labor relations are also changing. Develop new forms of contractual relationships outside the traditional contract between employer and employee in which both supported the legislation and social security protection, particularly in Europe. These include, for example, agency work and outsourcing companies nominally independent self-employed contractors. Even in cases where the legal relationship between employer and employee remains unchanged, the implicit contract between the company and the worker, for which an individual could expect an offer of security and gratification in exchange for their loyalty to the company, has certainly changed. Increasingly they are asking people to take responsibility for their own working lives and careers and also to ensure the constant updating of their training and qualifications.

Moreover, the development of information technology and communication has changed the way businesses operate. The work is no longer subject to spatial and temporal boundaries clear: the development of mobile working and teleworking shows that the work can be done outside the office or workplace that is dissipated altiempo traditional growing demarcation between the hours work and time at home.

Professionals, managers and senior staff are particularly affected by these evoluciones.En certain aspects, the truth is that these workers are supporting more pressure because they must take the lead in driving their organizations in times of rapid changes in management, while taking on new responsibilities in the progression of their careers.

The professional staff is not immune to suffer the negative consequences of change. The restructuring process, the elimination of hierarchical levels and downsizing adopted by many companies in the 90's for example, had the effect that segasen media management positions. Many older workers suddenly found themselves prematurely pushed into a premature retirement.

And those who remained in office, saw the work-related stress is becoming a significant problem in the workplace.

However, if the production of goods and services must rely less on the exploitation of physical capital and more on the use made of human capital, then there are clear opportunities in the information society and knowledge for professional with a high level of training. We are increasingly aware that we must address the knowledge and human skills to drive economic development.

Professionals and management personnel should be then, in many ways better off than other workers to reap the benefits of information society. But we have to make an important caveat: It depends on who gives them the opportunity to adapt in times of change.

The skills necessary to work effectively need to be constantly renewed through a process of lifelong learning. The emphasis is shifting from knowledge acquisition to competence development. Maybe in the future the ability to solve problems, social skills, teamwork, adaptability, creative thinking and flexibility in the answers are more valuable than knowledge of facts or the ability to practice repetitive skills.

This report examines the best practices of European trade unions to help and support to its members professional and managerial staff in these times of change. As will be seen, many unions have begun to actively perform in various sectors, a pioneering and valuable. The unions extend their traditional support offered through processes of social dialogue and collective bargaining, other innovative services and in many cases tailored to the needs of professionals. Here are some examples:

• support in carrying out needs analysis and career development

• direct support to find new and better jobs

• direct support for training and continuing education

• support workers who work as independent contractors or independent

• support staff working abroad

• innovative use of new technologies in communication with professional staff.

However, this report begins by placing these events in context, briefly review recent EU initiatives on employment and employability, skills, mobility and lifelong learning.

The European context

For several years the EU has been concerned to establish an appropriate strategic framework for tracking changes that are occurring in the workplace, employment and the economy.

The employment crisis affecting the European Union during the 90 induced the development of the first European Employment Strategy, launched in 1997. It identified four priority areas common among whom were the employability ("ensure that people can develop skills suitable for work opportunities in a world of rapid change) and adaptability" to develop ways new and flexible working to reconcile security with flexibility. ")

The European Employment Strategy was redefined in 2002 to establish three general principles: full employment, quality and productivity at work and strengthening the cohesion and inclusion. Two of the ten accompanying guidelines are especially pertaining to the subject matter of this report 1:

• Address change and promote adaptability and mobility in the labor market.

• Encourage the development of human capital and lifelong learning.

The influential Employment Taskforce chaired by Wim Kok, set out to examine the progress of the European Employment Strategy by making public its report in November 2003. Among others, he was critical of the lack of progress made in promoting adaptability.

He spoke of market failure in getting to undertake sufficient investment in continuing education and lifelong learning and individual workers.

In part and in response, the European Commission and the European Council stressed again in 2004, the importance for the European Employment Strategy to invest more and more effectively in human capital and increase the adaptability of workers, as two of the four key areas for future action inmediate.

These issues are directly linked to European initiatives in skills and mobility. After the 2001 report of the High Level Task Force on Skills and Mobility, (Working Group High-level skills and mobility) in February 2002 was released on their own Action Plan for Skills and Mobility. There was referred to the need for "a workforce that has the skills and the ability to adapt and acquire new knowledge throughout their working lives." He added that "strategies for lifelong learning and mobility are essential ...."

Progress in implementing the Action Plan have been subject to a review paper published by the Commission in early 2004.

A second initiative, which is closely linked to the promotion of lifelong learning. The Feira European Council in June 2000 called on member states, the Council of Ministers and the Commission to "identify coherent strategies and practical measures to promote education throughout life for all." Lifelong learning is seen as an integral part of the effort to obtain the achievement of the Lisbon objectives of making Europe "the oft-quoted phrase-" the knowledge-based economy more competitive and dynamic world. " The report of the Commission Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality (Making of European Learning Area throughout life a reality) was published in November 2001. It calls on social partners to participate actively in the development, promotion and use of education. It identifies the unions, along with other service providers, community and voluntary groups and employers, as one of the parties with a role to play in providing and promoting educational opportunities for its members.

The actual level of demand for training in member countries of the European Union continues to be dismally low. According to the Commission the participation rate in 2002 was only 8.5% among adults between 25 and 64 in the member states before enlargement. Now the European Union has set a goal for the year 2010 the tariff of 12.5%

The participation rate in training is certainly greater among workers with more education, although the overall percentage of the region from which the EU-15, still does not exceed 15%. Some countries (notably Denmark, Finland, Sweden and the UK) have better numbers, more than 30%.

Given the specific need to improve capacities for lifelong learning in information and communication technology (ICT skills and Internet), in late 2001 established the ICT Skills Monitoring Group (ICT Follow-up training) to investigate the demand ICT and Internet capabilities in Europe, report 2002. Subsequent to this fact since an initial conference on Internet capabilities, the European Commission established in 2003, European e-skills Forum (Forum of European capabilities on the internet). The Forum published its own report in 2004, before the European Conference on Internet Capacity of Thessaloniki in the fall of 2004. This report makes a number of recommendations including the need to address the problem of ICT sector in Europe with a long-term strategic perspective. It also states:

"The concern stems from the fact that they start to lose jobs in most professional levels of activity. Those jobs are in the upper echelons of the knowledge economy: exactly in the place of occupational range in which all build the common aspirations of future economic activity and therefore employment growth within the European Union .

These diverse and intertwined issues have been addressed during the dialogue between the European social partners. Social dialogue between representatives of employers and trade unions joined in the 1988 Single European Act and since then matters relating to vocational training and employability have been discussed frequently in the social dialogue process between the organization entrepreneurs, UNICE, the European Centre for Public Enterprises, CEEP and the European Trade Union Confederation.

A new text on continuing education, Framework of Actions for the development of competencies and skills throughout life, was signed between the European social partners in the spring of 2002 (in 2003 and 2004 followed by other statements).

Among others, the 2002 statement made the following observation:

"To foster a culture of lifelong learning, trade unions, as well as the employers have a key role in the information, support and guidance of its members and its members should develop relevant knowledge needed to perform that function."

We may summarize, therefore, reiterating that the employability, adaptability and continuous learning are priorities of the political agenda in Europe. The remainder of this report now turns to more closely focus on the specific needs of professional workers and care they receive from the trade unions in Europe.

Introduction: managing the change process

The world is changing rapidly. The assumptions that many individuals and societies

made on the nature of their jobs and employment, only a generation ago,

have now lapsed.

In an increasingly globalized economy, international trade in services and

products is growing rapidly. Large corporations increasingly operate as

Label instead of a single country. Neoliberal economic thinking

led to an international agenda that gives prominence to the liberalization

and economic privatization. All this has brought major disruption

key sectors of the economy.

The way work is done is changing. The jobs no longer

serve for life. Careers and do not develop in a linear progression reassuring

upward. The old hierarchical structures of work, going back to the approaches of "scientific management" of the early twentieth century, have been put into question and in some cases dismantled. Companies adopt new management styles.

Labor relations are also changing. Develop new forms of contractual relationships outside the traditional contract between employer and employee in which both supported the legislation and social security protection, particularly in Europe. These include, for example, agency work and outsourcing companies nominally independent self-employed contractors. Even in cases where the legal relationship between employer and employee remains unchanged, the implicit contract between the company and the worker, for which an individual could expect an offer of security and gratification in exchange for their loyalty to the company, has certainly changed. Increasingly they are asking people to take responsibility for their own working lives and careers and also to ensure the constant updating of their training and qualifications.

Moreover, the development of information technology and communication has changed the way businesses operate. The work is no longer subject to spatial and temporal boundaries clear: the development of mobile working and teleworking shows that the work can be done outside the office or workplace that is dissipated altiempo traditional growing demarcation between the hours work and time at home.

Professionals, managers and senior staff are particularly affected by these evoluciones.En certain aspects, the truth is that these workers are supporting more pressure because they must take the lead in driving their organizations in times of rapid changes in management, while taking on new responsibilities in the progression of their careers.

The professional staff is not immune to suffer the negative consequences of change. The restructuring process, the elimination of hierarchical levels and downsizing adopted by many companies in the 90's for example, had the effect that segasen media management positions. Many older workers suddenly found themselves prematurely pushed into a premature retirement.

And those who remained in office, saw the work-related stress is becoming a significant problem in the workplace.

However, if the production of goods and services must rely less on the exploitation of physical capital and more on the use made of human capital, then there are clear opportunities in the information society and knowledge for professional with a high level of training. We are increasingly aware that we must address the knowledge and human skills to drive economic development.

Professionals and management personnel should be then, in many ways better off than other workers to reap the benefits of information society. But we have to make an important caveat: It depends on who gives them the opportunity to adapt in times of change.

The skills necessary to work effectively need to be constantly renewed through a process of lifelong learning. The emphasis is shifting from knowledge acquisition to competence development. Maybe in the future the ability to solve problems, social skills, teamwork, adaptability, creative thinking and flexibility in the answers are more valuable than knowledge of facts or the ability to practice repetitive skills.

This report examines the best practices of European trade unions to help and support to its members professional and managerial staff in these times of change. As will be seen, many unions have begun to actively perform in various sectors, a pioneering and valuable. The unions extend their traditional support offered through processes of social dialogue and collective bargaining, other innovative services and in many cases tailored to the needs of professionals. Here are some examples:

• support in carrying out needs analysis and career development

• direct support to find new and better jobs

• direct support for training and continuing education

• support workers who work as independent contractors or independent

• support staff working abroad

• innovative use of new technologies in communication with professional staff.

However, this report begins by placing these events in context, briefly review recent EU initiatives on employment and employability, skills, mobility and lifelong learning.

The European context

For several years the EU has been concerned to establish an appropriate strategic framework for tracking changes that are occurring in the workplace, employment and the economy.

The employment crisis affecting the European Union during the 90 induced the development of the first European Employment Strategy, launched in 1997. It identified four priority areas common among whom were the employability ("ensure that people can develop skills suitable for work opportunities in a world of rapid change) and adaptability" to develop ways new and flexible working to reconcile security with flexibility. ")

The European Employment Strategy was redefined in 2002 to establish three general principles: full employment, quality and productivity at work and strengthening the cohesion and inclusion. Two of the ten accompanying guidelines are especially pertaining to the subject matter of this report 1:

• Address change and promote adaptability and mobility in the labor market.

• Encourage the development of human capital and lifelong learning.

The influential Employment Taskforce chaired by Wim Kok, set out to examine the progress of the European Employment Strategy by making public its report in November 2003. Among others, he was critical of the lack of progress made in promoting adaptability.

He spoke of market failure in getting to undertake sufficient investment in continuing education and lifelong learning and individual workers.

In part and in response, the European Commission and the European Council stressed again in 2004, the importance for the European Employment Strategy to invest more and more effectively in human capital and increase the adaptability of workers, as two of the four key areas for future action inmediate.

These issues are directly linked to European initiatives in skills and mobility. After the 2001 report of the High Level Task Force on Skills and Mobility, (Working Group High-level skills and mobility) in February 2002 was released on their own Action Plan for Skills and Mobility. There was referred to the need for "a workforce that has the skills and the ability to adapt and acquire new knowledge throughout their working lives.

These diverse and intertwined issues have been addressed during the dialogue between the European social partners. Social dialogue between representatives of employers and trade unions joined in the 1988 Single European Act and since then matters relating to vocational training and employability have been discussed frequently in the social dialogue process between the organization entrepreneurs, UNICE, the European Centre for Public Enterprises, CEEP and the European Trade Union Confederation.

A new text on continuing education, Framework of Actions for the development of competencies and skills throughout life, was signed between the European social partners in the spring of 2002 (in 2003 and 2004 followed by other statements).

Among others, the 2002 statement made the following observation:

"To foster a culture of lifelong learning, trade unions, as well as the employers have a key role in the information, support and guidance of its members and its members should develop relevant knowledge needed to perform that function."

We may summarize, therefore, reiterating that the employability, adaptability and continuous learning are priorities of the political agenda in Europe. The remainder of this report now turns to more closely focus on the specific needs of professional workers and care they receive from the trade unions in Europe.

Introduction: managing the change process

The world is changing rapidly. The assumptions that many individuals and societies

made on the nature of their jobs and employment, only a generation ago,

have now lapsed.

In an increasingly globalized economy, international trade in services and

products is growing rapidly. Large corporations increasingly operate as

Label instead of a single country. Neoliberal economic thinking

led to an international agenda that gives prominence to the liberalization

and economic privatization. All this has brought major disruption

key sectors of the economy.

The way work is done is changing. The jobs no longer

serve for life. Careers and do not develop in a linear progression reassuring

upward. The old hierarchical structures of work, going back to the approaches of "scientific management" of the early twentieth century, have been put into question and in some cases dismantled. Companies adopt new management styles.

Labor relations are also changing. Develop new forms of contractual relationships outside the traditional contract between employer and employee in which both supported the legislation and social security protection, particularly in Europe. These include, for example, agency work and outsourcing companies nominally independent self-employed contractors. Even in cases where the legal relationship between employer and employee remains unchanged, the implicit contract between the company and the worker, for which an individual could expect an offer of security and gratification in exchange for their loyalty to the company, has certainly changed. Increasingly they are asking people to take responsibility for their own working lives and careers and also to ensure the constant updating of their training and qualifications.

Moreover, the development of information technology and communication has changed the way businesses operate. The work is no longer subject to spatial and temporal boundaries clear: the development of mobile working and teleworking shows that the work can be done outside the office or workplace that is dissipated altiempo traditional growing demarcation between the hours work and time at home.

Professionals, managers and senior staff are particularly affected by these evoluciones.En certain aspects, the truth is that these workers are supporting more pressure because they must take the lead in driving their organizations in times of rapid changes in management, while taking on new responsibilities in the progression of their careers.

The professional staff is not immune to suffer the negative consequences of change. The restructuring process, the elimination of hierarchical levels and downsizing adopted by many companies in the 90's for example, had the effect that segasen media management positions. Many older workers suddenly found themselves prematurely pushed into a premature retirement.

And those who remained in office, saw the work-related stress is becoming a significant problem in the workplace.

However, if the production of goods and services must rely less on the exploitation of physical capital and more on the use made of human capital, then there are clear opportunities in the information society and knowledge for professional with a high level of training. We are increasingly aware that we must address the knowledge and human skills to drive economic development.

Professionals and management personnel should be then, in many ways better off than other workers to reap the benefits of information society. But we have to make an important caveat: It depends on who gives them the opportunity to adapt in times of change.

The skills necessary to work effectively need to be constantly renewed through a process of lifelong learning. The emphasis is shifting from knowledge acquisition to competence development. Maybe in the future the ability to solve problems, social skills, teamwork, adaptability, creative thinking and flexibility in the answers are more valuable than knowledge of facts or the ability to practice repetitive skills.

This report examines the best practices of European trade unions to help and support to its members professional and managerial staff in these times of change. As will be seen, many unions have begun to actively perform in various sectors, a pioneering and valuable. The unions extend their traditional support offered through processes of social dialogue and collective bargaining, other innovative services and in many cases tailored to the needs of professionals. Here are some examples:

• support in carrying out needs analysis and career development

• direct support to find new and better jobs

• direct support for training and continuing education

• support workers who work as independent contractors or independent

• support staff working abroad

• innovative use of new technologies in communication with professional staff.

However, this report begins by placing these events in context, briefly review recent EU initiatives on employment and employability, skills, mobility and lifelong learning.

The European context

For several years the EU has been concerned to establish an appropriate strategic framework for tracking changes that are occurring in the workplace, employment and the economy.

The employment crisis affecting the European Union during the 90 induced the development of the first European Employment Strategy, launched in 1997. It identified four priority areas common among whom were the employability ("ensure that people can develop skills suitable for work opportunities in a world of rapid change) and adaptability" to develop ways new and flexible working to reconcile security with flexibility. ")

The European Employment Strategy was redefined in 2002 to establish three general principles: full employment, quality and productivity at work and strengthening the cohesion and inclusion. Two of the ten accompanying guidelines are especially pertaining to the subject matter of this report 1:

• Address change and promote adaptability and mobility in the labor market.

• Encourage the development of human capital and lifelong learning.

The influential Employment Taskforce chaired by Wim Kok, set out to examine the progress of the European Employment Strategy by making public its report in November 2003. Among others, he was critical of the lack of progress made in promoting adaptability.

He spoke of market failure in getting to undertake sufficient investment in continuing education and lifelong learning and individual workers.

In part and in response, the European Commission and the European Council stressed again in 2004, the importance for the European Employment Strategy to invest more and more effectively in human capital and increase the adaptability of workers, as two of the four key areas for future action inmediate.

These issues are directly linked to European initiatives in skills and mobility. After the 2001 report of the High Level Task Force on Skills and Mobility, (Working Group High-level skills and mobility) in February 2002 was released on their own Action Plan for Skills and Mobility. There was referred to the need for "a workforce that has the skills and the ability to adapt and acquire new knowledge throughout their working lives." He added that "strategies for lifelong learning and mobility are essential ...."

Progress in implementing the Action Plan have been subject to a review paper published by the Commission in early 2004.

A second initiative, which is closely linked to the promotion of lifelong learning. The Feira European Council in June 2000 called on member states, the Council of Ministers and the Commission to "identify coherent strategies and practical measures to promote education throughout life for all." Lifelong learning is seen as an integral part of the effort to obtain the achievement of the Lisbon objectives of making Europe "the oft-quoted phrase-" the knowledge-based economy more competitive and dynamic world. " The report of the Commission Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality (Making of European Learning Area throughout life a reality) was published in November 2001. It calls on social partners to participate actively in the development, promotion and use of education. It identifies the unions, along with other service providers, community and voluntary groups and employers, as one of the parties with a role to play in providing and promoting educational opportunities for its members.

The actual level of demand for training in member countries of the European Union continues to be dismally low. According to the Commission the participation rate in 2002 was only 8.5% among adults between 25 and 64 in the member states before enlargement. Now the European Union has set a goal for the year 2010 the tariff of 12.5%

The participation rate in training is certainly greater among workers with more education, although the overall percentage of the region from which the EU-15, still does not exceed 15%. Some countries (notably Denmark, Finland, Sweden and the UK) have better numbers, more than 30%.

Given the specific need to improve capacities for lifelong learning in information and communication technology (ICT skills and Internet), in late 2001 established the ICT Skills Monitoring Group (ICT Follow-up training) to investigate the demand ICT and Internet capabilities in Europe, report 2002. Subsequent to this fact since an initial conference on Internet capabilities, the European Commission established in 2003, European e-skills Forum (Forum of European capabilities on the internet). The Forum published its own report in 2004, before the European Conference on Internet Capacity of Thessaloniki in the fall of 2004. This report makes a number of recommendations including the need to address the problem of ICT sector in Europe with a long-term strategic perspective. It also states:

"The concern stems from the fact that they start to lose jobs in most professional levels of activity. Those jobs are in the upper echelons of the knowledge economy: exactly in the place of occupational range in which all build the common aspirations of future economic activity and therefore employment growth within the European Union .

These diverse and intertwined issues have been addressed during the dialogue between the European social partners. Social dialogue between representatives of employers and trade unions joined in the 1988 Single European Act and since then matters relating to vocational training and employability have been discussed frequently in the social dialogue process between the organization entrepreneurs, UNICE, the European Centre for Public Enterprises, CEEP and the European Trade Union Confederation.

A new text on continuing education, Framework of Actions for the development of competencies and skills throughout life, was signed between the European social partners in the spring of 2002 (in 2003 and 2004 followed by other statements).

Among others, the 2002 statement made the following observation:

"To foster a culture of lifelong learning, trade unions, as well as the employers have a key role in the information, support and guidance of its members and its members should develop relevant knowledge needed to perform that function."

We may summarize, therefore, reiterating that the employability, adaptability and continuous learning are priorities of the political agenda in Europe. The remainder of this report now turns to more closely focus on the specific needs of professional workers and care they receive from the trade unions in Europe.

FACTORS IN SHAPING EMPLOYMENT SYSTEMS

Introduction: managing the change process

The world is changing rapidly. The assumptions that many individuals and societies

made on the nature of their jobs and employment, only a generation ago,

have now lapsed.

In an increasingly globalized economy, international trade in services and

products is growing rapidly. Large corporations increasingly operate as

Label instead of a single country. Neoliberal economic thinking

led to an international agenda that gives prominence to the liberalization

and economic privatization. All this has brought major disruption

key sectors of the economy.

The way work is done is changing. The jobs no longer

serve for life. Careers and do not develop in a linear progression reassuring

upward. The old hierarchical structures of work, going back to the approaches of "scientific management" of the early twentieth century, have been put into question and in some cases dismantled. Companies adopt new management styles.

Labor relations are also changing. Develop new forms of contractual relationships outside the traditional contract between employer and employee in which both supported the legislation and social security protection, particularly in Europe. These include, for example, agency work and outsourcing companies nominally independent self-employed contractors. Even in cases where the legal relationship between employer and employee remains unchanged, the implicit contract between the company and the worker, for which an individual could expect an offer of security and gratification in exchange for their loyalty to the company, has certainly changed. Increasingly they are asking people to take responsibility for their own working lives and careers and also to ensure the constant updating of their training and qualifications.

Moreover, the development of information technology and communication has changed the way businesses operate. The work is no longer subject to spatial and temporal boundaries clear: the development of mobile working and teleworking shows that the work can be done outside the office or workplace that is dissipated altiempo traditional growing demarcation between the hours work and time at home.

Professionals, managers and senior staff are particularly affected by these evoluciones.En certain aspects, the truth is that these workers are supporting more pressure because they must take the lead in driving their organizations in times of rapid changes in management, while taking on new responsibilities in the progression of their careers.

The professional staff is not immune to suffer the negative consequences of change. The restructuring process, the elimination of hierarchical levels and downsizing adopted by many companies in the 90's for example, had the effect that segasen media management positions. Many older workers suddenly found themselves prematurely pushed into a premature retirement.

And those who remained in office, saw the work-related stress is becoming a significant problem in the workplace.

However, if the production of goods and services must rely less on the exploitation of physical capital and more on the use made of human capital, then there are clear opportunities in the information society and knowledge for professional with a high level of training. We are increasingly aware that we must address the knowledge and human skills to drive economic development.

Professionals and management personnel should be then, in many ways better off than other workers to reap the benefits of information society. But we have to make an important caveat: It depends on who gives them the opportunity to adapt in times of change.

The skills necessary to work effectively need to be constantly renewed through a process of lifelong learning. The emphasis is shifting from knowledge acquisition to competence development. Maybe in the future the ability to solve problems, social skills, teamwork, adaptability, creative thinking and flexibility in the answers are more valuable than knowledge of facts or the ability to practice repetitive skills.

This report examines the best practices of European trade unions to help and support to its members professional and managerial staff in these times of change. As will be seen, many unions have begun to actively perform in various sectors, a pioneering and valuable.

CONCLUSION

We may summarize, therefore, reiterating that the employability, adaptability and continuous learning are priorities of the political agenda in Europe. The remainder of this report now turns to more closely focus on the specific needs of professional workers and care they receive from the trade unions in Europe.

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