Community Needs Assessment for Community House

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Contents

I. Executive and State of the Grantee

II. Summary of Community Needs.

III. Program Goals

IV. Data and Methodology Used for Assessment

V. General Description

VI. Geographic Location

a) Harrison County

b) Cities located in Harrison County

2. Biloxi

3. D’Iberville

4. Gulfport

5. Long Beach

6. Pass Christian

a) MCH-EHS Waitlist

VII. Early Head Start Eligible Child and Families

b) Tell Us About You?

1. What is your zip code

2. What is your Marital Status?

3. What is your gender?

4. What is the age range?

5. What is your ethnicity?

6. What language do you speak at home?

7. What is your citizenship?

a) Tell Us About Where You Work?

1. Are you currently employed?

2. What is your annual household income?

3. What type of industry are you employed in?

8. Top Employers at Moore Community House Early Head Start

4. What keeps you from working as much as you want or need to?

5. Do you get any kind of Public Assistance?

a) Tell Us About Your Family

1. Which of the following best describes your family?

2. Which describes your relationships with the child/children?

3. How many children live with you? And how old?

4. Is the father involved in the child life?

5. Are you currently caring for a child whose parent is incarcerated?

6. Does your child participate in the MCH-EHS programs or other childcare program

7. Does the lack of childcare hinder you from job training or education

a) Tell Us About Your Education

1. Tell us about your highest level of education

2. Are you currently in school?

a) Tell me about your financial literacy

1. Which of the following best describes you and how you manage money?

2. How confident are you making financial decisions?

3. What kind of banking do you currently have?

4. Have you used check cashing place to cash your checks?

5. Have you ever used a payday loan

6. Do you have any credit cards?

7. Have you lost use of a credit cards?

a) Tell us about your housing and transportation

1. Which of the following best describes your current living situation?

2. How many times have you moved in the past year

3. Have your lost your home or have the utilities turn off

4. What means of transportation do you use to travel

5. Do you have problems finding adequate transportation?

a) Tell us about your Health

1. Do you currently have health insurance?

2. Do your child/children have healthcare coverage?

3. What type of healthcare do you currently have?

4. Do you currently have a healthcare provider?

5. Does your child have a healthcare provider?

6. Does your child or children diagnosed with a disability?

7. Do you get your child immunized?

8. On the scale from 1 to 4, 4 being extremely important and 1 being not important, how important do you think the following vaccinating your child is in preventing diseases in children?

9. Do you currently have dental insurance and is your child covered?

10. When was the last time you went to the dentist?

11. Do you have any family members diagnosed with nutrition related diseases? Such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol

12. Are you currently pregnant?

13. If yes, are you currently receiving prenatal care?

14. If yes, are you considered a high risk pregnancy?

a) Tell us about your overall Well Being

1. Our family eats meals together.

2. Our family eats while watching TV.

3. Our family eats out.

4. Our family uses microwave or ready to eat foods.

5. Our family encourages our child to be active every day.

6. My child eats breakfast.

7. My child eats fruits and vegetables at meals or snacks.

8. My child drinks sugar-sweetened drinks

9. Evaluate the Following Statement

a) Top 5 High Stressors

b) Top 5 Concerns Stressors

c) Top 5 Worry

10. Do you wish there more resources in the community

Executive Summary and State of the Grantee

Moore Community House (MCH) has a history of serving and empowering low income families in East Biloxi since 1924. MCH’s history enabled the agency to develop strong diverse partnerships with other service agencies in the community. In 1998, MCH was awarded an Early Head Start grant. Moore Community House Early Head Start (MCH-EHS) is a family-centered program that uses a holistic approach to work with individuals and within the whole family. This approach is used because it is considered “best practice” for supporting child and family growth and development.

Each year, MCH-EHS provides high quality, comprehensive services to 104 infants, toddlers, pregnant women, and their families. MCH-EHS promotes school readiness for children from birth to age three in low-income families by offering educational, nutritional, health, social and other services, which enhance the lives of the whole family. MCH-EHS operates two centers providing full care of infants and toddlers five days a week, ten hours per day, and twelve months of the year.

Summary of Community Needs

Moore Community House has conducted a 2016-2017 Community Assessment update. The update details recent changes from last year and trends within Harrison County and the Early Head Start/Head Start service population that potentially impact the Moore Community Early Head Start Program.

The following are changes observed based on responses to the Community Assessment survey:

  • Zip Code: Increase of respondents residing in Gulfport area
  • Marital Status: Increase in the number of Married or Divorced respondents and decrease in Single parent respondents
  • Age: Increase of respondents aged 30-39
  • Race: Increase of Caucasian respondents
  • Language and Ethnicity: Decrease of Hispanic respondents
  • Employment Status: Increase of respondents who are unemployed, retired, and/or disabled
  • Industry of Employment: Increase of respondents working in the restaurant industry and self-employed
  • What keeps them from working: Lack of childcare is the number one reason why respondents said they are not working and cannot attend job training or further their education
  • Public Assistance: Increase in the number of respondents receiving public assistance
  • Incarcerated: Increase in the number of people who are caring for the children of incarcerated parents
  • Education and Job training:  Decrease in number of respondents enrolled in school
  • Financial Literacy Capabilities: Survey questionnaire revealed that respondents somewhat stay on a budget and feel somewhat comfortable making financial decisions versus non-confident or confident
  • Check Cashing systems: Increase in the number of people paying to have checks cashed and use payday loans
  • Housing and Homelessness: Increase in the number of respondents living with other people on a consistent basis or moving frequently between homes, a significant increase in families who rent apartments or houses, but a decrease in the number of people who receive Section 8 housing assistance.
  • Housing and Utilities: Increase in number of people who lost their home and / or had their utilities turned off
  • Immunizations: 88% of the respondents reported that they think it is important for children to be immunized, and 7% of the respondents have children who are not immunized
  • Dental health:  Increase in the number of respondents whose children are covered with dental health insurance.

Program Goals

As determined from this Community Assessment, MCH EHS will continue working toward the same goals as established in Program Year 2013-14. The need for Early Head Start/Head Start services in the area is still pronounced.

Goal 1: Continue to provide services to children during the first years of their life so that they may have the best foundation for a lifetime of learning.

Goal 2: Provide childcare to families for their children in order for parents to work and/or further their education/job training.

Goal 3:  Provide support, education and resources for families of enrolled children who are facing economic and social hardships.

Goal 4:  Provide assistance for families and MCH staff members to increase their financial literacy and improve their fiscal stability through collaborations with community partners who provide resources and education.

Goal 5: Continue to provide culturally sensitive services, education and resources to children and their families.

Goal 6:  Promote healthy children and families.

Goal 7:  Provide nutrition education and support for children and their families geared toward the prevention of obesity and chronic disease.

Goal 8:  Provide support, resources and educational services to pregnant women and their families.

Data and Methodology Used for Assessment

Extensive research was conducted and several sources of primary and secondary data were used to compile the information.

Primary data is derived from 2013 to 2017 MCH-EHS survey responses, MCH-EHS annual Program Information Reports (PIR), and other MCH-EHS child and family information. Survey data was gathered from a survey of 100 families residing in Harrison County who were applying for a position for their child in the EHS program.  The parents had a choice to complete the survey on-line or through a paper copy. The overall goals of the surveys were: (1) to identify the health, social, and other family support service needs of low-income and Head Start-eligible families and their preferred patterns for using these services; (2) to determine the availability of needed services; (3) to discover barriers to accessing and receiving these services; and (4) to learn of any unmet family needs. All surveys were entered into the Survey Monkey on-line program, which calculated the results.

MCH-EHS staff members input program information on children that were served in the MCH-EHS program and their families for the years 2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-2016 into the Child Plus data system.  The information is compiled into an annual Program Information Report.

Results from the survey and program information are compared over the four-year periods to reflect patterns of families’ needs and living situations in the community.

General Description

Moore Community House currently has three facilities located in the East Biloxi area.  Two Early Head Start centers consist of thirteen classrooms.  Each classroom is composed of eight children and two teaching staff.  Other staff members at these centers include floater teachers, mentor teachers, center managers, coordinators, kitchen staff and the EHS director.  The administrative building houses fiscal staff, the executive director, and the Women in Construction program.

Geographic Location

A.               Harrison County

Harrison County has the largest population and the greatest number of cities in Mississippi. It is bordered on the east by industrialized Jackson County and on the west by Hancock County. This strategic central position has been largely responsible for Harrison County’s diversity. Harrison County has a wide mix of businesses, from retail and manufacturing, to pharmaceuticals and healthcare research, to composite technology and shipbuilding (is this a direct quote or are you paraphrasing? Harrison County Development Commission). Also, four military bases are located on the Gulf Coast:  Naval Battalion Center, Trent Lott Readiness Training Center, Keesler Air Force Base and the U.S. Coast Guard Station.  Harrison County is made up of five cities: Pass Christian, Long Beach, Gulfport, Biloxi and D’Iberville. Each city has its own special qualities that makes the coast a wonderful place to live and grow.

B.                Cities located in Harrison County

1.                 Biloxi

Biloxi is becoming one of the fastest and biggest growing cities on the coast. It’s known for its casinos, fishing and shrimping industry. Biloxi has been one of the top tourist destinations in the county because of its rich history. Biloxi is home to nine casinos, which provide several resort hotels, 24-hour gambling and other forms of entertainment. Biloxi is also rich in art culture as the home of the Ohr Museum. Biloxi is also now home to a minor league baseball team on the Gulf Coast, the Biloxi Shuckers. Biloxi has one military base, Keesler Air Force Base, which houses the Hurricane Hunters and other training battalions.

2.                 D’Iberville

Incorporated in 1988, D’Iberville is the youngest city on the coast. Today the city is known for its explosion of retail development. D’Iberville’s first casino opened in December 2015.

3.                 Gulfport

Gulfport is the second largest city in the state of Mississippi. It is a transportation and business hub for the state. Gulfport is home to several colleges, retail centers and casinos.

4.                 Long Beach

Long Beach is one of the most livable communities on the coast.  Tucked in between Pass Christian and Gulfport, Long Beach houses the Gulf Park campus of the University of Southern Mississippi.

5.                 Pass Christian

Pass Christian is a quiet resort town, also very attractive for families. It has a rich history in the seafood industry. Pass Christian is the birthplace of yachting in the South.

C.               MCH-EHS Waitlist

This map shows where MCH-EHS wait-listed families live.

  Early Head Start Eligible Child and Families

D.               Demographic Information

In 2016, Mississippi is ranked 50th overall in child well-being, 47th in education, 49th in health, 49th in economic well-being and 50th in family and community.  Mississippi’s total population is 3.002 million. Of that number, Harrison County’s population is 201,410. The community assessment consists of five coastal municipalities (Biloxi, D’Iberville, Gulfport, Long Beach and Pass Christian.) Below is the map of the children enrolled in MCH-EHS.

According to Talk Poverty, “Mississippi ranks 51st among states for families who had incomes below the poverty line and women who are working age in 2015. Female headed families in the Gulf Coast face very high poverty rates.” According to Sterling Best Places, there are an estimated 48.35% of people in Harrison County, Mississippi, who are married, while 14.54% are divorced. According to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, “female-headed families in the Gulf Coast region face very high poverty rates. Nearly two in every five female-headed families with children live in poverty.” Mississippi ranks worst in the nation for women according to health and economic indicators measured by the Institute of Women’s Policy Research.

The median age in Harrison County, Mississippi, is 35.4 years old; the US median is 37.4.

The Mississippi Gulf Coast is one of the most ethnically diverse areas of the state. The majority of the population on the Gulf Coast is white and African American, with a significant Vietnamese and Hispanic population as well.

According to the Mississippi Department of Education, the state’s “English Learner (EL) population is growing rapidly. The state now serves more than 12,100 identified EL students.”

1.                 What is your zip code?

Survey Respondents
Population Total 2 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Mississippi

Harrison County

2,992,333

203,234

# % # % # % # %
Biloxi 48,299 68 68% 80 80% 74 74% 71 71%
Gulfport 72,266 20 20% 10 10% 15 15% 20 20%
D’Iberville 10,222 12 12% 10 10% 10 10% 7 7%
Long Beach 15,626 0 0% 0 0% 1 1% 1 1%
Pass Christian 5,240 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Saucier 1,342 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 1 1%
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Biloxi 72 75 79 69
East Biloxi 33 27 35 30
Gulfport 17 17 14 17
D’Iberville 10 8 8 16
Long Beach 0 1 1 1
Pass Christian 0 0 0 0

2.                 What is your Marital Status?

Survey  Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
# % # % # % # %
Single 71 71% 61 61% 76 76% 65 65%
Married 29 29% 29 29% 20 20% 26 26%
Divorced 0 0% 6 6% 2 2% 9 9%
Widowed 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Separated 0 0% 4 4% 2 2% 0 0%

3.                 What is your gender?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
# % # % # % # %
Male 18 18% 9 9% 4 4% 5 5%
Female 82 82% 91 91% 96 96% 95 95%
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Male 42 42 53 53
Female 57 59 49 49

4.                 What is your age range?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
18-20 51 51% 35 35% 33 33% 4 4%
21-29 31 31% 47 47% 48 48% 46 46%
30-39 18 18% 14 14% 15 15% 45 45%
40-49 0 0% 4 4% 4 4% 5 5%
50+  0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
18-20 2 3 4 7
21-29 44 55  57 66
30-39 62 63 60 44
40-49 19 15 13 8
50+ 5 2 3 2

5.                 What is your ethnicity?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
White 11 11% 10 10% 20 20% 24 24%
Black 58 58% 75 75% 57 57% 66 66%
American Indian 0 0% 0 0% 3 3% 0 0%
Asian 2 2% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander or ? 11 11% 3 3% 2 2% 0 0%
Hispanic or Latino 18 18% 12 12% 18 18% 10 10%
Bi-Racial and Multi-Racial 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
White 11 5 6 5
Black 71 71 67 70
American Indian 0 0 0 0
Asian 0 0 0 1
Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander or ? 0 0 0 0
Hispanic or Latino 13 17 16 13
Bi-Racial and Multi-Racial 4 8 13 14

6.                 What language do you speak at home?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
English 78 78% 88 88% 83 83% 93 93%
Spanish 19 19% 10 10% 17 17% 7 7%
Vietnamese 3 3% 2 2% 0 0% 0 0%
PIR Results of  Enrolled and Completed Parents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
English 86 86 87 74
Spanish 12 15 15 12
Vietnamese 0 0 0 1

7.                 What is your citizenship?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
US Citizen 88 88% 87 87% 88 88% 98 98%
Foreign National/US Resident/ Green Card 12 12% 12 12% 12 12% 2 2%

E.                Employment

Mississippi is ranked 46th nationally in the percentage of all workers who are unemployed.  According to Mississippi Labor Market Data, there are 5,040 people unemployed in Harrison County and 81,850 people employed in Harrison County. The unemployment rate in Mississippi 6.1% and 5.8% in Harrison County.

Parental employment doesn’t necessarily lift a family out of poverty. Minimum wage ($15,080/year) is below the federal poverty level for a family of two ($15,410) and is less than half Mississippi’s Self-Sufficiency wage ($37,080) – a wage calculated to support the basic needs of a family, such as housing, child care, food, transportation and health care.  In Mississippi, women’s median wages are 18% less than that of men. Mississippi’s culture and economy steer women into gender-stratified, low-paying employment sectors.

The top three occupations for mothers in low-income families are health aides, cashiers, and housekeepers or maids. These often do not provide a family-sustaining wage or the benefits that help working mothers stay employed.  Other jobs that pay family-sustaining wages without postsecondary education are often in non-traditional fields for women; they may not have the experience or skills needed to perform those jobs without training.

The Mississippi Gulf Coast has a rich history of tourism, fishing, maritime shipping and manufacturing, in addition to science and innovation. There are currently 12 casinos in Harrison County that are major employers of Moore Community House participants and other residents in the County. In addition, individuals are employed at the two military bases located in Harrison County.

Mississippi now ranks worst in the nation for child poverty, with 31.8 percent of children living in poverty, and the worst in the nation in child well-being. For every 100 families with children in poverty in the state, only ten now receive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance. Women are more likely to ask for assistance than men. According to the Mississippi Low Income Child Care Initiative, in 2014, more than 30 percent of Mississippi’s children were living in poverty. More than half of black children lived in poverty, while two in five Hispanic children, one in three American Indian children, and one in five white children lived in families with incomes below $23,492 a year for a family of four. The state also has the highest number of children living in extreme poverty, that is, with family incomes at half that rate. The Mississippi Low Income Child Care Initiative says that “living on $23,492 or less a year guarantees that these children struggle in families with homelessness and hunger, deprived of the critical supports they need in their early years to become self-sustaining.” Mississippi’s maximum monthly TANF cash assistance amount ($170 for a family of 3) is consistently the lowest in the nation.

1.                 Are you currently employed?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Employed Full Time/Part Time 70 70% 68 68% 64 64% 62 62%
Not Employed 27 27% 30 30% 32 32% 32 32%
Retired or Disabled 3 3% 2 2% 4 4% 6 6%
PIR PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Two Parent Families
Two Parent Employed 9 7 6 7
One Parent Employed 17 20 17 10
Two Parent Unemployed 28 23 23 27
One Parent Families
One Parent Employed 53 53 52 57
One Parent Unemployed 28 23 23 27

1.                 What is your annual household income?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Less than $10,000 78 82 91 87
$10,000-$14,999
$15,000-$24,999
$25,000 to $34,999 21 17 8 13
$35,000 to $49,999
$50,000 and up 1 1 1  0
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Income Eligibility
Eligible 0-100% 71 65 68 77
101-130% 11 11 6 4
Over Income 1 1 2 2
Foster Child 0 1 4 3
Homeless 3 1 5 5
Public Assistance 13 22 17 12
Annual Household Income
$0 to $2999 14 18 25 30
$3000 to $5999 5 5 9 12
$6000 to $8999 8 7 10 15
$9000 to $11999 7 10 11 14
$12000 to 14999 4 9 11 10
$15000 and Over 61 52 36 22

2.                 What type of industry are you employed in?

 Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Not Employed 27 30 32 32
Casino 18 18 18 15
Restaurants 9 9 9 15
Medical and Dental  Facilities 10 3 11 10
Retail Establishments 13 3 5 9
Self Employed 5 9 5 15
Childcare and Education 2 9 7 10
Service Industry 4 5 6 13
Hotels 4 7 3 4
Banks and Financial Institution 2 3 3 1
Construction 4 1 1 8
Law Enforcement and Military 2 3 0 0
MCH MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
# % # % # % # %
Industrial 4 4% 4 7% 15 16% 13 13%
Casino 22 25% 10 17% 20 22% 22 22%
Hospitality 32 36% 20 34% 25 27% 22 22%
Military 5 6% 3 5% 4 4% 1 1%
Medical 5 6% 7 12% 6 6% 16 16%
Education 15 17% 9 15% 13 14% 12 12%
Other Services 2 2% 1 2% 3 3% 6 6%
Self Employed 4 4% 5 8% 7 8% 7 7%
Total 89 100% 59 100% 93 100% 99 100%

2.                 Employers of Moore Community House Early Head Start Families

(1)               Industrial Jobs
  • 2013-2014 Industrial Jobs: Women in Construction, offshore jobs, UPS , Utility Partners of Gulfport
  • 2014-2015 Industrial Jobs: Women in Construction, BLP Paint Biloxi, Ability Works
  • 2015-2016  Industrial Jobs: Construction, Offshore, Corso Inc., E-Fire, Gulf Coast Produce, Waste Pro
  • 2016-2017 Industrial Jobs: Gulf Coast Produce, Air Condition Company, Diversified, Broadus Painting, FL Crane, independent construction companies, J.L. Collins Construction.
(2)               Casino Jobs
  • 2013-2014 Casino Jobs: Beau Rivage, Golden Nugget, Harrah’s, IP Casino, Boomtown
  • 2014-2015 Casino Jobs: Beau Rivage, Hard Rock, IP Casino, Boomtown
  • 2015-2016 Casino Jobs: Beau Rivage, Golden Nugget, Hard Rock, Harrah, IP Casino, Island View, Treasure Bay
  • 2016-2017 Casino Jobs: Beau Rivage, Palace Casino, Hard Rock, Treasure Bay, Scarlet Pearl, Island View, IP Casino, Boomtown.
(3)               Hospitality Industry (Food and Beverage, Hotel and Retail)
  • 2013-2014 Hospitality Jobs: Walmart, McDonalds, Base Exchange, Bubba Gump Restaurant, Four Points by Sheraton, Hampton Inn, Keesler Inn, Pizza Hut, Shaggy’s Restaurant
  • 2014-2015 Hospitality Jobs: Base Exchange, Chick-Fil-A, Dillard’s, Four Points by Sheraton, Pizza Hut and Wal-Mart
  • 2015-2016 Hospitality Jobs: Waffle House, AAA Food Service, Applebee‘s, Walmart
  • 2016-2017 Hospitality Jobs: Margaritaville Resort, Bacchus Restaurant, McDonald, Walmart, Winn Dixie, Keesler Dining, Morton Steakhouse, Private Staff Pro.
(4)               Military and Law Enforcement Industry
  • 2013-2014 Military and Law Enforcement Jobs: Army National Guard, Air National Guard, Department of VA, Keesler, Navy, and Harrison County Policy Department
  • 2014-2015 Military and Law Enforcement Jobs: Keesler, Navy, Harrison County Police Department
  • 2015-2016 Military and Law Enforcement Jobs:  Army National Guard, Air National Guard, Department of VA, Keesler
  • 2016-2017 Military and Law Enforcement Jobs: Army National Guard, VA.
(5)               Healthcare
  • 2013-2014 Healthcare  Jobs: Bienville Orthopedic, Biloxi Regional, Coastal Family Health Care Clinics, Critter Sitter, Nursing Homes, Psychologist
  • 2014-2015 Healthcare Jobs: Biloxi Regional, Coastal Family Health Care Clinics, Citter Sitter (veterinary), Family Health Centers
  • 2015-2016 Healthcare Jobs: Biloxi Regional, Home Health, Memorial Hospital
  • 2016-2017 Healthcare Jobs: Millcreek of Moss Point, Memorial Hospital, Plasma Center, Weight Loss Clinic, Coastal Family Pharmacy, Greenbrier, various nursing and home health contractors.
(6)               Educational Field
  • 2013-2014 Education Jobs Cross Road Elementary, Community Development Institute (CDI) of Harrison County Head Start, MCH-EHS, Kelly Services, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College (MGCCC), Biloxi School District
  • 2014-2015  Education  Jobs: MCH, MGCCC
  • 2015-2016 Education Jobs: Cross Road Elementary, CDI of Harrison County Head Start, MCH-EHS
  • 2016-2017 Education Jobs: MCH-EHS, All God’s Children Childcare, Harrison County School District, CDI of Harrison County Head Start, Alphabest, Kelly Services.
(7)               Other Employment Services
  • 2013-2014 Other Employment Opportunity Jobs: Coast 2 Coast
  • 2014-2015 Other Employment Opportunity Jobs: Cabrera and Cabrera Law Firm, M and M Bank
  • 2015-2016 Other Employment Opportunity Jobs: Mississippi Department of Human Services, Kelly Services, BLP Paint
  • 2016-2017 Other Employment Opportunity Jobs: Jackson Civic Action Agency, Photo Booth Rental, Blake Gym and Fitness, private home cleaning services, Gulfport Job Corp.
(8)               Self Employed
  • 2013-2014- 5 Parents who are self employed
  • 2014-2015-4 Parents who are self employed
  • 2015-2016- 7 Parents who are self employed
  • 2016-2017- 7 Parents who are employed.

3.                 What keeps you from working as much as you want or need to?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
# %
Lack Of Child Care 58 58%
No Transportation 6 6%
Skills Don’t Fit Jobs 16 16%
Fears Of Losing Public Assistance 5 5%
Health Issues 2 2%
Retired 0 0%
Discrimination 3 3%
In School 10 10%

4.                 Do you get any kind of Public Assistance?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
# %
No Assistance 13 13%
Public Assistance 87 87%
Type of Public Assistance
Medicaid 60
TANF 4
Social Security 5
Food Stamps 70
WIC 35
Public Housing 9
Unemployment Benefits 1
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Public Assistance 13 22 17 12
TANF 12 15 17 14
SSI 17 17 13 9
WIC 93 64 75 83

F.                Family and Household Information

Female-headed, low-income families in Mississippi are increasingly finding it hard to secure a job that pays family-sustaining wages because they don’t have the required postsecondary education. Approximately 43 percent of women heading low-income working families in Mississippi have no postsecondary education. In order for a single family to make sure they are having their basic needs meet, family must earn twice the federal poverty guideline.

Children age and income eligible for Early Head Start: Income eligible: Each year, at least 600 children are born into poverty in Harrison County and are eligible for the Early Head Start program.  Therefore, over a three-year period that a child could be enrolled in the program, over 1,800 children need the service.

South Mississippi has the highest child abuse counts in the state. Harrison County has 619 child abuse cases, and 1,407 children are living in the foster care system.

1.                 Which of the following best describes your family?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Two Parent Family 42
One Parent Family 58
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Two Parent Family 28 29 26 18
One Parent Family 81 76 75 84

2.                 Which describes your relationships with the child/children?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Parents 92
Grandparents 4
Relatives 3
Foster 0
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Adopt/Natural Step 96 101 98 97
Foster 1 0 3 3
Grand Child 1 0 1 1
Niece and Nephew 1 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0

3.                 How many children live with you? And how old?

Survey Respondents
Children in Household 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes 90 94 92 96
No 10 6 8 4
Age of Children?
0-2 65
3-5 42
6-13 45
14-17 15

4.                 Is the father involved in the child life?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, Fathers are involved in child life 58
No, fathers not involved in child life 42

5.                 Are you currently caring for a child whose parent is incarcerated?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, I am caring for child with incarcerated parent 15 25 18 22
No, I’m not caring for child with incarcerated parent 85 75 82 78

6.                 Does your child participate in the MCH-EHS programs or other childcare program?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, Currently enrolled in MCH-EHS 57
No, My child is not enrolled in MCH-EHS but attends other childcare programs. 22
No, my does not attend any childcare programs 21

7.                 Does the lack of childcare hinder you from job training or education?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, my lack of childcare hinders my job training and or education 51
No, does not hinders my job training and or education 49

There are 54 licensed facilities in Harrison County. Of that number, 38 have the capability to care for infants and toddlers and accept the Mississippi Childcare Subsidy Funds. But not all families are able to receive the child care subsidy.  The number of recipients has been reduced due to the lack of funding and budget cuts. Mississippi is fifth highest in the nation? in the number of cuts made to its child care subsidy program. Consequently, many families leave their children in inconsistent care situations and/or with unlicensed providers. Because of the fluid statuses and situations of families and child care providers, the Mississippi Department of Health (MSDH) is unable to determine the number of unlicensed child caregivers in Harrison County.  According to MSDH Regulations for Child Care Licensing, anyone providing care for more than five unrelated children must be licensed.

Today almost two-thirds of Mississippi’s 500,000 schoolchildren are from low-income families. Fifty-five percent are eligible for free lunch at school, and more than 9 percent receive reduced-price lunches.

Mississippi must invest in its young children by ensuring access to affordable and high-quality early childhood education.  Early childhood education may have the potential to mitigate some of the effects of poverty and plays a particularly important role in the lives of children in Mississippi.

Education

There are several reasons why Mississippi has been falling behind the nation in educational attainment. Primarily, too many students are not school-ready and never catch up; too many students drop out of high school; and among those who finish high school, too few go onto college. Children who receive quality early childhood education tend to do better in school, graduate at higher rates, become more financially independent and have better jobs and higher earnings over a lifetime than those without such an education. A simple investment in ensuring high-quality, universal early childhood education for all of Mississippi’s children could and would make an enormous difference in the state’s future. A building resting on a shaky or weak foundation will not stand. Children who enter grade school without the basic skills that quality early childhood education provides lack the foundation for success. According to a Miles to Go article, “Twenty-seven percent of Mississippi adults had no high school diploma in 2000. In 2004, the state ranked 48th in the nation in college education, with only about 20 percent of Mississippi adults with a bachelor’s degree.”

8.                 Tell us about your highest level of education.

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Did not attend school 0 0 0 0
Elementary School (K-5) 0 0 0 0
Middle School (6-8) 0 0 0 0
High School (9-12) 13 15 34 13
High School Diploma/GED 87 85 66 87
Have Either Vocational, Some College, AA Degree, Bachelor Degree or Graduate Degree 65
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Advanced Degree 5 4 4 5
Some College/Associates 12 20 16 13
HS Grad or GED 76 66 69 73
Less High School Grad 16 15 12 12

9.                 Are you currently in school?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Full or part-time at a four-year undergraduate college/university 8 22 4 7
Full or part-time at a two-year undergraduate college/university 33 45 12 21
Part-time or full-time Graduate School 3 2 6 0
Not enrolled in school 56 31 78 72
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Two Parent Families
Two Parent In school 2 1 0 0
One Parent In School 4 2 2 1
Two Parent None in School 22 26 24 18
One Parent Families
One Parent in School 23 17 12 12
One Parent None in School 58 59 63 72

G.               Financial Literacy

Mississippi is the only state in the nation to receive an F on the 2016 National Report Card on Adult Financial Literacy. Sixty-four percent of Mississippi residents do not have an emergency fund. Close to half, 47 percent, of households lack a traditional bank account, or need to supplement their accounts with another financial product such as a prepaid card. About 41 percent of Mississippi consumers turn to nontraditional lenders, such as a payday lender, when they need money, more than any other state. According to the state treasury website:

  • 60% Mississippians break even or spend more than they bring in
  • 41% have overdue medical bills – highest in the nation
  • 64% have no rainy-day fund
  • 38% use payday loans, title loans, pawn shops or other non-bank borrowing
  • 47% lack a traditional bank account
  • Only 40% pay their credit cards in full each month
  • 10% have underwater mortgages
  • 60% don’t shop around or compare credit cards
  • 68% lack a fundamental financial literacy knowledge

Nearly one-third of non-elderly Mississippi households struggle to cover their basic needs. This means that 236,215 households in the state do not have enough income to pay for rent, food, child care, health care, and transportation. The 32% of Mississippi households struggling to get by represents a substantial and diverse proportion of the state, and includes married couples with children, full-time working parents, men and women, and people from all racial and ethnic backgrounds. There are over 17,000 households struggling to make ends meet in Harrison County.

1.                 Which of the following best describes you and how you manage money?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Do not budget 5
Somewhat on a budget 55
Keep a Budget 40

2.                 How confident are you making financial decisions?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Not Confident 4
Somewhat 55
Confident 41

3.                 What kind of banking do you currently have?

Survey Respondents
  2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Checking and Saving Account 48 62 38 47
Saving Account 14 12 10 12
Checking Account Only 14 8 19 18
Unbanked 24 18 33 23

4.                 Have you used check cashing place to cash your checks?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, I have paid to get checks cashed. 18 13 23 35
No, I have not paid to get checks cashed 82 87 77 65

5.                 Have you ever used a payday loan?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, I have used a payday loan. 50 25 14 50
No, I have not used a payday loan. 50 75 86 50

6.                 Do you have any credit cards?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, I have credit cards 25
No, I do not have credit cards 75

7.                 Have you lost use of a credit cards?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, Lost use of credit cards 22
No I do not have any credit cards 78

H.               Housing and Transportation

Affordable housing is key to living a stable, secure life, and is closely linked to an individual’s ability to save money and reach financial independence. Hardworking Mississippians should be able to afford decent housing and still be able to pay for basics, like groceries, child care and medicine. Sadly, affordable housing is out of reach for too many Mississippi families.  One-third of Mississippi’s homeowners and 53 percent of renters spend more than 30 percent of their monthly income on housing.  One out of every four senior citizen homeowners spends more than 30 percent of their monthly income on housing. More than 12,100 Mississippi children experience homelessness each year. More than 12,845 public school students were homeless (what year?).

1.                 Which of the following best describes your current living situation?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Own a Home 9 17 9 11
Rent a Home or Apartment 49 55 46 74
Section 8 Housing 33 20 40 0
Homeless, Live with people on consistent basis or moves frequently between homes. 9 8 5 15
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Number of Families experiencing homelessness that were served during the enrollment year 4 11 8
Number of children experiencing homelessness that were served during the enrollment year 4 11 8
Number of families that acquired housing during the program term 4 7 5

2.                 How many times have you moved in the past year?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
None 56
Once 36
Twice 6
3 or More 2

3.                 Have you lost your home or have the utilities turn off?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, I have lost my home and/or utilities turned off 5 16 11 16
No, I have not lost my home and/or utilities turned off 95 84 89 84

4.                 What means of transportation do you use to travel?

Survey Respondents
2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Car pool 16 7 6
Public Transportation 3 2 6
Walked 2 1 2
Working from Home 2 0 0
Own Transportation 77 90 86

5.                 Do you have problems finding adequate transportation?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes 85
No 15

I.                   Health Indicators

Mississippi ranks 50th out of all 50 states in overall health status. Mississippi is the unhealthiest state with the most adults suffering from diabetes. A third of Mississippi adults are obese, and a third of adults have high blood pressure. A high percentage of the state’s residents smoke, drink alcohol excessively and often die from accidents.

Only 29,000 – or 4 percent – of the state’s children have (private?) health insurance. However, Medicaid provides health insurance for another 328,000 low-income children; in fact, children make up nearly 60% of Mississippi’s Medicaid population (American Academy of Pediatrics). According to the Mississippi Center for Justice, “Better health outcomes are directly related to insurance coverage that prevents developmental problems in children, increases workforce productivity, reduces use of emergency room services and decreases the cost of publicly-funded programs.”  Poor health in childhood leads to poor health later in life.

When Mississippians try to the address the health care needs of the early childhood population, ensuring that children have access to health care services is priority. According to the Department of Human Services, the ratio of pediatricians to children under 5 is 1.579. There are 51 licensed pediatricians in the state who perform the Early Periodic Developmental Screenings.  Of the 82 counties in the state, 38 do not have an available pediatrician.

Mississippi does have the nation’s highest rate of immunized children. According to the Washington Post, “More than 99.7 percent of Mississippi children enrolled in kindergarten last year received all recommended doses of the MMR vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella; the DTaP vaccine which prevents diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (also known as whooping cough); and the varicella vaccine which protects against the chickenpox.”  Mississippi has very strict immunizations laws compared to many other parts of the country, and unlike many states, will now allow parents to skip vaccinations for religious or philosophical reasons. Medical exemptions must be requested by a doctor and approved by the state department of health.

The Mississippi State Department of Health’s First Steps program is intended to ensure that eligible infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities receive the necessary and appropriate early intervention services throughout the state. On average, fewer than 20% of young children are properly screened to identify any special needs, or approximately 27,295 Mississippi children. According to the First Five Count, “In Mississippi, 17,742 kids under the age of 3 are at risk of developmental delays or disabilities that will set them back when they start school, yet only 2,358 are currently receiving early intervention services through Part C of IDEA.”  There are children who have a developmental disability in Harrison County.

Tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Mississippi currently does not have adequate dental service providers for young children.  Mississippi’s young children from low-income families also face the barrier of having access to few providers that accept Medicaid or CHIP. According to a state Department of Health survey of third-grade students, “63 percent of the children had experienced one or more cavities during their lifetime; 31 percent currently had untreated tooth decay and five percent of the children surveyed were in need of urgent dental care.”

Mississippi has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the nation, and a two to one disparity between white children and non-white children. In MSDH District IX, which includes Harrison County, the infant mortality rate has decreased. The overall life expectancy for children born in Mississippi in the past decade (2004-2013) is 75 years. Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, is the leading cause of death in Mississippi, accounting for over a third of all deaths in the state.  According to the 2017 Kids Count report, “Between 2011 and 2015, there were 1,120 child deaths in Mississippi. Accidents were the leading cause of death of children under 18 in Mississippi (514 deaths) followed by assault (84), malignant neoplasms (77), and congenital malformations, deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities (59). Other causes may include septicemia, anemias, meningitis, diabetes and cerebrovascular diseases.”

In 2016, there were 8,390 pregnancies, or approximately 76 pregnancies for every 1,000 girls aged 15 through 19. According to the National Council to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, “ Between 1991 and 2010, there were 159,653 teen births in Mississippi, costing taxpayers a total of $4 billion over that period.”   According to Mississippi Vital Records, “over the past three years,a total of 8,498 children were born in Harrison County, MS. Of that number, 855 were teen moms.”

1.                 Do you currently have health insurance?

Survey Respondents
  2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
 Yes, I have health insurance.  79 94 56 59
No, I do not have a health insurance.  21 6 44 41

2.                 Do your child/children have healthcare coverage?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Insurance 79 94 56  86
No Insurance 21 6 44 14

3.                 What type of healthcare do you currently have?

Survey Respondents
Insurance Coverage 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Chips/Medicaid/Tricare/ Employer 93 109 99 82
Private Insurance 6 1 1 8
No Insurance 1 2 2

4.                 Do you currently have a healthcare provider?

Survey Respondents
  2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, Parent has health care provider 57 59 56 50
No, parent does not have a health care provider 43 41 44 50

5.                 Does your child have a healthcare provider?

Survey Respondents
Health Care Provider 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, my child has health care provider. 79 89 92 90
No, my child do not have a health care provider. 21 11 8 10

6.                 Does your child or children diagnosed with a disability?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes 13
No 87
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, Diagnosed Disability 23 24 17 10
No, Diagnosed Disability 77 76 83 90

7.                 Do you get your child immunized?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes 93
No 7

8.                 On a scale from 1 to 4, 4 being extremely important and 1 being not important, how important do you think the following vaccinating your child is in preventing diseases in children?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
1 8
2 4
3 10
4 78

9.                 Do you currently have dental insurance and is your child covered?

Survey Respondents
2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, My child is covered by dental insurance 59 84
No, my child is not covered by dental insurance 41 16

10.             When was the last time you went to the dentist?

Survey Respondents
2015-2016 2016-2017
1-2 Years 96 78
3-4 Years 4 16
5+ Years 0 6

11.             Do you have any family members who were diagnosed with nutrition related diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol?

Survey Respondents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
 Yes, I have a family member or members that suffers from nutrition related disease 66 56 46 52
No. none of my family members suffer from nutrition related disease 44 44 54 48

12.             Are you currently pregnant?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, I am pregnant 6
No, I am not pregnant 90
 PIR Results of  Enrolled and Completed Parents
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Expecting Women 9 6 11 9

13.             If yes, are you currently receiving prenatal care?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, I am receiving prenatal care 5
No, I am not receiving prenatal care 1
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, I am receiving prenatal care 9 6 11 9

14.             If yes, are you considered a high-risk pregnancy?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, I am considered a high-risk pregnancy 3
No, I am not considered high-risk 3
PIR data on MCH-EHS Children and Families
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Yes, I am considered a high-risk pregnancy 2 3 5 0

J.                 Overall Well Being

Although more than 35 percent of Mississippians are obese, the state no longer tops the list for large residents: Mississippi is now ranked third for most obese adults. Today, 1 in 5 Mississippi  children is overweight or obese. Childhood obesity is likely to persist into adult life and puts individuals at risk for stroke, hypertension, diabetes and other chronic diseases. During the early childhood years, eating habits are formed for a lifetime. According to CDC, “15 percent of children aged 2 to 4 years in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program were overweight.”   According to University of Mississippi Medical Center, “of an obese person generates 40 percent more in medical costs per year than a non-obese person. In 2008, Mississippi spent $925 million in health-care costs directly related to obesity. If the trend continues, obesity related health-care costs will be $3.9 billion by 2018.” According to 2016-17 PIR data 8 percent of MCH-EHS children are consider to be overweight, 5% are considered underweight and 87 percent are consider to be healthy. When Families eat at their dinner tables gives the child a healthy attitude toward food.

Children spend on average 25 hours a week in front of the television, children under the age of two should not be allowed to use television as entertainment. Research has found strong associations between increases in advertising for non-nutritious foods and rates of childhood obesity. Most children under age 6 cannot distinguish between programming and advertising and children under age 8 do not understand the persuasive intent of advertising. According to the CDC, “Children under the age of 2 are exposed to 4,427 TV ads per year and children’s exposure to TV ads for unhealthy food products (i.e., high-calorie, low-nutrient snacks, fast foods and sweetened drinks) are a significant risk factor for obesity.”

Consumption of meals eaten away from home, especially fast food, has increased over the past years. 62% of dining budget is spent eating fast goods. According to Health Grove, “There are 7 fast foods per 1000 Harrison County Residents.”

According to the CDC website, “32.3% of Mississippi’s adults reported that during the past month, they had not participated in any physical activity” elementary and middle school/junior high students are required to take physical education for 50 minutes per week. According to CDC website, “Healthy, active and well-nourished children and youth to attend school and more prepared and motivated to learn.” 74 percent of the America’s youth were found to be unfit in 2004 according to CDC.

Fruit and vegetable intake is an important part of a healthy diet and is associated with numerous positive health outcomes. Although diets high in fruit and vegetables are associated with decreased risk for many chronic diseases nationally, 37.7 percent of adults consume fruits less than one time a day, and 22.6 consume vegetables less than one time a day. Burden of Chronic Diseases in Mississippi,” About half of adults reported eating 1 or more fruits daily about two-thirds of adults reported eating 1 or more vegetables daily.

1.                 Our family eats meals together.

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Almost Never 2
Sometimes 18
Usually 24
Almost Always 56

2.                 Our family eats while watching TV.

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Almost Never 15
Sometimes 50
Usually 12
Almost Always 23

3.                 Our family eats out.

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Almost Never 20
Sometimes 60
Usually 16
Almost Always 4

4.                 Our family uses microwave or ready to eat foods.

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Almost Never 29
Sometimes 67
Usually 2
Almost Always 2

5.                 Our family encourages our child to be active every day.

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Almost Never 0
Sometimes 9
Usually 24
Almost Always 67

6.                 My child eats breakfast.

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Almost Never 0
Sometimes 8
Usually 13
Almost Always 79

7.                 My child eats fruits and vegetables at meals or snacks.

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Almost Never 1
Sometimes 15
Usually 18
Almost Always 66

8.                 My child drinks sugar-sweetened drinks

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Almost Never 22
Sometimes 61
Usually 7
Almost Always 10

9.                 Evaluate the Following Statement.

  2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
High Stressor Concern No Worry High Stressor Concern No worry High Stressor Concern No Worry
Financial Issues 12 19 69 19 30 51 35 25 11
Price of Utilities/fuel 12 16 72 15 24 61 26 27 11
Child Care 13 5 82 39 21 40 32 16 9
Need for education/job training 18 14 68 13 17 70 28 26 6
Need for Employment 22 9 69 21 13 66 31 22 8
Medical/Dental Issues 14 6 80 8 13 79 26 23 11
Housing Issues 11 7 82 11 12 77 33 15 10
Having Enough Food 7 3 90 3 12 85 21 19 13
Mental Health 6 2 92 2 10 88 21 17 10
Lack of Transportation 8 8 84 6 9 85 14 23 14
Afterschool Care 15 9 76 19 9 72 15 9 11
Marital/ Personal Relationships 13 6 81 6 7 87 23 14 12
Safety in School/Work Place 8 3 89 6 6 88 25 16 14
Language Barriers 5 4 91 0 4 96 16 15 7
Domestic Violence 4 2 94 1 4 95 20 10 9
Mental, Physical, Sexual, or Child Abuse issues 7 1 92 1 4 95 24 9 7
My Child’s Disabilities 4 5 91 13 2 85 24 16 9
Substance Abuse 4 1 95 1 2 97 19 7 7

10.             Top Stressors in 2016-2017

a)                  Top 5 High Stressors

(1)               Financial Issues
(2)               Housing Issues
(3)               Child Care
(4)               Need for Employment
(5)               Need for education/job training

b)                 Top 5 Concerns

(1)               Housing Issues
(1)               Need for Employment
(2)               Financial Issues
(3)               Medical/Dental Issues
(4)               My Child’s Disabilities

c)                  Top 5 no Concerns

(1)               Price of Utilities/Fuel
(2)               Marital/Personal Relationships
(3)               Having Enough Food
(4)               Lack of Transportation
(5)               Safety in School/Work Place

11.             Do you wish there more resources in the community?

Survey Respondents
2016-2017
Yes, there are not enough resources in the community 78
No, there are enough resources in the community 22
Please explain some resources needed in the community

  • More temporary assistance with monthly bills
  • More assistance for people who need help when times get hard
  • More homeless shelters
  • Increase slots for all eligible children at MCH
  • More resources for East Biloxi residents
  • More activities to positively motivate people in the neighborhood
  • More reliable, visible, public transportation
  • More support for parents to go back to school
  • GED Prep
  • More jobs in the area

Works cited

  • New Item. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 17 Apr. 2017. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • “Best Places to Live in Biloxi, Mississippi.” Sperling’s Bestplaces. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • Buffington, John. “Data » Mississippi KIDS COUNT » Mississippi Data Books.” Mississippi KIDS COUNT. N.p., 08 Mar. 2017. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • “For Mississippi parents, child care costs lead to tough choices.” The Hechinger Report. N.p., 11 May 2016. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • Health, Mississippi State Department of. “Vital Records.” Vital Records – Mississippi State Department of Health. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • “Home.” Mississippi Department of Human Service. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • “Labor Market Data.” MDES – Labor Market Data. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • “Miles to go Mississippi–Pre-Kindergarten: Time to Begin (pdf).” N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • “Mississippi State .” Chronicdiseaseimpact.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • “MS receives F on adult financial literacy report card.” N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.
  • “Sitemap.” The National Campaign To Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2017.

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