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Examination Of Supplier Diversity At Boeing Aerospace Company Engineering Essay

Boeing is the worlds leading aerospace company and the largest manufacturer of commercial jetliners and military aircraft combined. Headquartered in Chicago, Boeing employs more than 158,000 people across the United States and in 70 countries. This represents one of the most diverse, talented and innovative workforces anywhere. Our enterprise also leverages the talents of hundreds of thousands more skilled people working for Boeing suppliers worldwide.

"I'm inspired every day, foremost, by our people, but also our products and our passion to do things that others can only dream of and to make the world better tomorrow than it is today." –

Chairman, President and CEO Jim McNerney

Boeing Supplier Diversity Is Key to Doing Business in the Global Century

 As Boeing increasingly focuses on its core competencies in high-end design, engineering and systems integration, they need suppliers that are highly focused on their own core competencies, continually striving to create additional value in everything they do. Small and diverse companies have proved in competition that they bring innovation, flexibility and strength to our supply base, as well as a passion for helping Boeing deliver the strongest possible solutions to our own customers.

The Boeing Company, diversity brings strength, innovation and flexibility to our supply base. Tapping the skills and technologies available within the community of small and diverse businesses is vital to maintaining our position as the premier aerospace company in the world.

History of Supplier Diversity at Boeing

Boeing has had an established, formal small business and supplier diversity program in place since 1951. But even before that, Boeing success was built on diversity.

Throughout the years, Boeing has sought and found creative ways to promote opportunities for small businesses and we work with our first-tier suppliers to ensure that they too develop opportunities for diverse suppliers.

SUPPLY CHAIN SERVICE

Supply Chain Services are one segment of Boeing's integrated program of aerospace support services. The objective of Supply Chain Services is to improve aircraft availability and reduce costs according to customer-defined preferences.

Supply Chain Process

To provide supply chain services and obtain the maximum benefit for each customer, Boeing utilizes the following procedures:

* Timely and accurate information sharing between Boeing and the customer to attain the highest levels of service effectiveness

* Online, real-time, integrated information systems that are based on Web-architecture designs and are interfaced with comprehensive databases; these yield reliable demand forecasting, total asset visibility, maintenance information, and field data

* Reliability-based logistics and trigger-based asset management; these practices yield reliability improvements and identification of life-cycle cost-reduction opportunities so that aircraft fleet managers can make informed trade-offs between inventory levels and costing--enabling them to optimize the relationship of aircraft readiness to affordability

* Use of leading commercial warehousing practices, shipping practices, and innovative asset-sharing agreements with commercial airlines and component manufacturers; this ensures that the correct part is shipped to the correct place at the correct time worldwide

SURPLUS MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT OF BOEING MANUFACTURING EQUIPMENT

CNC PRODUCTION RIVETERS,

1 – GEMCOR MODEL G-39 CNC PRODUCTION RIVETER, S/N 529M A# 24363 L# C52, (Rebuilt By Hall Engineering), Longitudinal Capacity Approximately 60', 60” Pass-Thru Rivet Gap, Track-Mounted Carriage, 133' Track, 13' Cross Arm Positioners, Greco System CNC Station Control, Square D/Symax Load Monitor, Video Rivet Positioning Monitor

*1 – GEMCOR DRIVMATIC FASTENING SYSTEMS TYPE G-900-1 MODEL G40105XX-150G63 CNC PRODUCTION RIVETER, S/N 1281 A# 27868 L# A/C18, Longitudinal Capacity Approximately 96', 120” Pass-Thru Rivet Gap, Track-Mounted Carriage, 135' Track, 15' Cross Arm Positioners, Greco System CNC Station Control, Load Monitor, (2) Burle Quickpanel Video Rivet Positioning Monitors, (4) Syntron Vibratory Rivet Feeders, 60” Clamp Safety Lock, Fixture Load Capacity 6500-Lbs., ARS Air Panel, Thermal Transfer Fan Unit, 3-Phase,

10-kA, 600-Volt, 40VAC to 120VAC

RIVETER

1 – HUCK MODEL 917-5 PORTABLE HYDRAULIC RIVETER, S/N 0160 L# A55, Rivet Gun, 10-HP Hydraulic Unit

HYDRAULIC PRESSES

1 – SIEMPELKAMP 8000-TON HYDRAULIC BLADDER PRESS, A# 12912, Maximum Working Press Area 64” X 124”, Bladder Cart Size 60” X 120”, 150-HP Motor, Push Button Control

1 – HPM 5000-TON 4-POST HYDRAULIC PRESS, S/N 4328 A# 12906 (V-3) L# Q3, Bed Size 65”FB X 186”LR, Stroke 50”, Daylight 51”, Speeds: Closing 262 IPM, Pressing 17.9 IPM, Opening 262 IPM, Ram Cylinder Diameters: Main 72”, Pull Backs 15-1/2” & 8”, (5) Hydraulic Pumps, 49” X 124” Slide-In Table, Conveyor, Push Button Control

STRAIGHT SIDE PRESS

1 – BROWN BOGGS MODEL 475-76 200-TON DOUBLE-CRANK TWIN END DRIVE STRAIGHT SIDE PRESS, A# 12910, Bed Size 62” X 75”, Stroke 12”, Shut Height 24”, Slide Adjustment 6”, 32-Ton Air Cushion, 25-HP Motor, Double Back-Geared OBI PRESSES

MISCELLANEOUS PRESSES

1 – HANNIFIN 75-TON HYDRAULIC ASSEMBLY PRESS, S/N A51785, Table Size 12” X 84”, Throat 11”

2 – EDWARDS HAND SCREW PRESSES, (1) 3 6”, L# D14, (1) 346

AIR DROP HAMMERS

2 – CHAMBERSBURG CECO-STAMP AIR DROP HAMMERS, (1) 9648 5-TON, S/N 2543 A# 12990, Bed Size 48” X 96”, Minimum Die Area 34” X 68”, Stroke 60”, Speed 112 Strokes/Hr, Maximum Die Weight 11,200-Lbs., (1) 4066 3-TON, Bed Size 40” X 66”, Minimum Die Area 43-1/2” X 25”, Stroke 24”, Speed 126 Strokes/Hr, Maximum Die Weight 3500-Lbs.

CNC HYDRAULIC PRESS BRAKE

1 – FARINA TYPE PFO-B20X1550 PFO/B205 20-TON X 5’ CNC HYDRAULIC PRESS BRAKE, S/N 294787-1-T A# 025143, Front-Operated Power Back Gage,

Compu-Bend Model 61000 CNC Control, Spectra Electronic Eye Power Press Equipment Safety Device

PRESS BRAKES

1 – CINCINNATI 12' 100-TON POWER PRESS BRAKE, S/N 11592, Throat 8”, Distance Between Housings 128”, Manual Back Gage, Dominion Press Control, Safety Light Curtain, 7-1/2-HP Motor

1 – CINCINNATI 50-TON X 6’ POWER PRESS BRAKE, S/N 22408 A# 0141011, Distance Between Housings 7’, Stroke 3”, Power Ram Adjustment, Dominion Power Press Equipment Safety Device, Squaring Arm Extensions, Dies

3 – FARINA MODEL PFO-B20X1550 20-TON X 5’ HYDRAULIC PRESS BRAKES, S/N 217787-I-T A# 027008, S/N 284781-I-T A# 027009, S/N 284787-I-T A# 027007, Bed Length 61”, Throat 9”, Distance Between Housings 41”, Compu-Bend 61000 CNC Control & Back Gage, Spectra Safety Electronic Light Curtains

PLATE FORMING ROLLS

1 – FARNHAM 14' PLATE FORMING ROLL, S/N 5-53-1 L# D2/3, (3) 2” Driven Bending Rolls, Gap Opening 6”, Distance Between Housings 15-1/2', 3-HP Motor

2 – FARNHAM 10' PLATE FORMING ROLLS, S/Ns 6-66-1, 6-66-2, Capacity 10' X .125”, Roll Diameter 2”, 3-HP AC Motor Drive

STRETCH WRAP FORMING MACHINES

1 – ERCO HYSP-2-300 300-TON HYDRAULIC STRETCH WRAP FORMING MACHINE, A# 12996, Table Platen Size 17” X 98”, Length of Cross Beams 134”, Traverse of Cross Beams 32”, (2) Cylinders, Piston Diameter 14”, Piston Stroke 12”

1 – HUFFORD 46 150-TON STRETCH WRAP FORMING MACHINE, S/N 16 A# 13001, Capacity 32” X 72” X 42”, 68”L Right & Left Hand Jaws, (11) Segments Per Side, Max. Curvature of Jaw 17” Radius, Max. Opening of Jaws 1/2”, 50-HP, (2) 15-HP, & 10-HP Motors, Push Button Control

BENDING ROLLS

1 – BROWN BOGGS 48” POWER BENDING ROLL

2 – JET SR-2024 24” X 20-GA BENCH-TOP HAND BENDING ROLLS, S/N 20154, S/N 20151 L# A/D14

1 – BROWN BOGGS 18” HAND BENDING ROLL

SHEARS

1 – HACO HSLX-4006 12’ CNC HYDRAULIC SQUARING SHEAR, S/N 66494 (1998) A# 027009, Hydraulic Holdowns, Front-Operated Power Back Gage, 3’

Squaring Arm, Digital Readout

1 – CINCINNATI MODEL 1008 8’ X 3/16” POWER SQUARING SHEAR, S/N 11699 A# 025882, Mild Steel Capacity 3/16”, Holdowns, Front-Operated Manual Back Gage, 6’ Squaring Arm, Extensions

SWAGERS

2– FENN MODEL 3A 1/2”TO 1” CAPACITY VERTICAL POWER TUBE SWAGERS, S/Ns N/A, 3-1/2-HP AC Motor Drive

MISCELLANEOUS FABRICATING EQUIP.

3 – GS ECKHOLD KF-314 C-FRAME STRETCH & SHRINK FORMING MACHINES, S/Ns KE-314 (2) N/A, Throat 12”, Capacity 1.5mm to 2mm

2 – LOCKFORMER BRAKE & FORMING MACHINES, S/Ns 1376, 1378

1 – HILLYARD ROLL FORMING MACHINE

1 – RIDGID POWER PIPE BENDER

WELDERS

2 – LINCOLN LC-P-300T 300-AMP PORTABLE ARC WELDERS, S/Ns N/A

3 – MILLER MVC-300 300-AMP PORTABLE WIRE WELDERS

1 – HOBART 300-AMP AC/DC PORTABLE ARC WELDER, S/N N/A

1 – WELD-O-MATIC 4-F 25-KVA SPOT WELDER, S/N 2675

CNC & NC VERTICAL DRILLING & ROUTING MACHINES

1 – TRUMPF TRUMATIC BFZ-3000 TYPE 9200 6-SPINDLE 2-AXIS CNC VERTICAL DRILLING & ROUTING MACHINE, S/N 3057 (1987) A# 025301, With Automatic Rivet Machine, (4) Drilling Units, (2) Routers, (6) High Speed Spindles, Travels: X 120”, Y 49”, Maximum Pack Thickness 11/16”, Drill Spindle Speeds 0 to 17,500 RPM, Router Spindle Speeds 0 to 14,500 RPM, Feeds 1 to 118 IPM, Allen-Bradley Series 8000 CNC Control, Loader & Unloader, Turbo Chip Conveyor, Pendant Control

1 – TRUMPF TRUMATIC BFZ-3000 TYPE 9200 6-SPINDLE 2-AXIS NC VERTICAL DRILLING & ROUTING MACHINE, S/N 3006 (1987) A# 022384 L# A/C15, With Automatic Rivet Machine, (4) Drilling Units, (2) Routers, (6) High Speed Spindles, Travels: X 120”, Y 49”, Maximum Pack Thickness 11/16”, Drill Spindle Speeds 0 to 17,500 RPM, Router Spindle Speeds 0 to 14,500 RPM, Feeds 1 to 118 IPM, McDonnell Douglas Actrion II NC Control, Loader & Unloader, Turbo-Type Chip Conveyor

HORIZONTAL BORING MILL

1 – GIDDINGS & LEWIS MODEL 500-T 5” TABLE-TYPE HORIZONTAL BORING MILL, S/N FASET-1130 A# M9 L# A/C-12, Table Size 36” X 72”, Longitudinal Table Travel 78”, Cross Travel 39”, Vertical Head Travel 40”, Spindle Speeds 22 to 1600 RPM, Spindle Feeds .0012 to .125 IPR, Table Feeds .1 to 30 IPM,

Heidenhain 2-Axis Digital Readout, Pendant Control, Outboard Saddle Supports

VERTICAL JIG BORERS

1 – KEARNEY & TRECKER MILWAUKEE C4 VERTICAL JIG BORER, S/N 5590 L# D1, Table Size 14” X 22-1/2”, Quill Travel 11”, Spindle Speeds 50 to 2500 RPM, Spindle Feeds .0005 to .0091 IPR

1 – MATRIX TYPE 50 OPTICAL JIG BORER, S/N K-105T L# L17, Table Size 26” X 36”, Longitudinal Table Travel 36”, Vertical Head Travel 20”, Quill Travel 8”, Spindle Feeds .001 to .015 IPR, Heidenhain 2-Axis Digital Readout, 4-1/4-HP Motor

BOEING 787 SUPPLIERS ( SUPPLY CHAIN)

Purchaser

Supplier

Plant/company location

Work package

Boeing

Air cruiser

New Jersey ,USA

Emergency evacuation slides

Boeing

Alcan rolled products (ravenswood)

Ravenswood west Virginia,USA

Aluminum products

Boeing

Alenia

Grottaglie, Italy

Centre fuselage(46)

Boeing

Alenia

Foggia , Italy

Horizontal Stabilizer(46)

Boeing

Alenia/Vought (global aeronautical)

International

Airport in South

Carolina was

selected as the

location for

Vought's 787

manufacturing

facility and the

Global

Aeronautica

Integration centre.

Vought produces

aft fuselage

sections 47 and 48

at its new

342,000-squarefoot

facility, which

will be co-located

with the 252,000-

square foot Global

Aeronautica facility.

Horizontal stabilizer, centre fuselage aft fuselage

Boeing

Astronautics corp.

Milwaukee,USA

Dual class 3 EFBs

Boeing

Boeing

Puget sound, Washington state,USA

Tail fin

Boeing

Hawker de Havilland

Melbourne and Sydney, Australia

Moveable trailing edge

Boeing

Boeing interior responsibility center

Washington, USA

Interior

Boeing

Boeing propulsion system division

South Seattle , Washington, USA

Engineering and

manufacturing

services

Boeing

Boeing

Commercial

Airplanes

Washington, USA

Aircraft development,

integration, final

assembly, programme

leadership

Boeing

Boeing

Composite

Manufacturing

Centre (CMC)

Fredickson,

Washington, USA

Vertical fin

Boeing

Boeing

Winnipeg

Winnepeg,

Canada

Wing-to-body fairing

Shear Ties

Complete Frame

Assemblies

Boeing

Boeing

Winnipeg

Winnepeg,

Canada

Shear ties

Boeing

Boeing

Winnipeg

Winnepeg,

Canada

Complete frame

Assemblies

Boeing

Bridgestone

Kurume Plant in

Fukuoka

Prefecture, Japan

Tyres

Boeing

Northwest

Composites,

Marysville,

Washington, USA

Composite frames,

sidewalls, window

reveals,

cargo linings,

door linings, door

surrounds

Boeing

Chengdu

Aircraft

Industrial

(Group) Co.

Ltd

Sichuan Province,

China

Composite rudder

Boeing

CTT Systems

Nykoping, Sweden

Zonal drying system

Boeing

Diehl Luftfahrt

Elektronik

(DLE)

Nuremberg,

Germany

LED-based lighting

systems for the main

cabin of the 787

Boeing

Diethelm Keller

Aviation

Singapore

Rotable food service

equipment

(carts/trolleys)

Boeing

Donaldson

Company

Minneapolis,

Minnesota, USA

Air purification system

Boeing

Dräger

Aerospace

Lübeck, Germany

Passenger service

Units

Boeing

EADS

Composites

Atlantic

Lunenberg, Nova

Scotia, Canada

Composite diagonal

brace

(for the pylon-to-wing

attachment section)

Boeing

ELTA

Israel

ATD 406 S

Emergency Locator

Transmitter

Boeing

Fischer

Advanced

Composite

Components

Reichersberg,

Austria

Thrust reverser

Components

Boeing

FR-HiTEMP -

now Eaton

Aerospace

South Molton,

Devon, UK

Fareham,

Hampshire, UK

Wimbourne,

Dorset UK

Fuel sub-system

(pumps and valves)

Boeing

Triumph

Composite

Systems

Spokane,

Washington, USA

Floor panel system

Boeing

GE Aircraft

Engines

Durham, North

Carolina, USA

GEnx engine

Boeing

GKN

Aerospace

Ultra

Luton, UK

Electro-thermal wing

ice protection system

(WIPS)

Boeing

GKN

Aerospace

St Louis, Missouri

USA

Slat skin

wing-to-body fittings/

wing-to-nacelle fittings

Boeing

Goodrich

Lighting

Systems

Lippstadt,

Germany and

Tampa, Florida,

USA

Exterior lighting

Boeing

Goodrich

Aircraft Interior

Products

Colorado Springs,

Colorado, USA.

Cabin attendant

Seating

Boeing

Goodrich

Lighting

Systems

Lippstadt,

Germany and

Tampa, Florida,

USA

Flight deck lighting

System

Boeing

Goodrich

Aircraft Wheels

and Brakes

Troy, Ohio, USA

Electric braking

Boeing

Goodrich Fuel

& Utility

Systems

Vergenne,

Vermont, USA

Proximity sensing

System

Boeing

Goodrich

Sensor

Systems

Burnsville,

Minnesota, USA

Icing conditions

Sensors

Boeing

Goodrich Deicing

and

Specialty

Systems

Unionstown, Ohio,

USA

Integrated heated

composite floor panels

Boeing

Goodrich

Cargo

Systems

Jamestown, North

Dakota, USA

Cargo operating

System

Boeing

Goodrich Fuel

& Utility

systems,

Vergenne,

Vermont, USA

Fuel quantity

indicating system and

fuel management

software.

Boeing

Hafei

Pingfang District,

Haerbin, China

Wing-to-body fairing

Panels

Boeing

Hamilton

Sundstrand

Airplane Power

System

Integration

Facility

(APSIF)

Rockford, Illinois

APU

Boeing

Hamilton

Sundstrand

Windsor Locks,

Connecticut, USA

Hydraulic pump

Subsystem

Boeing

Hamilton

Sundstrand

Windsor Locks,

Connecticut, USA

Environmental Control

System

Boeing

Hamilton

Sundstrand

Windsor Locks,

Connecticut, USA

Remote power

distribution units

Boeing

Hamilton

Sundstrand

Windsor Locks,

Connecticut, USA

Electrical -power

generating and start

system

Boeing

Hamilton

Sundstrand

Windsor Locks,

Connecticut, USA

RAM air turbine

emergency power

system

Boeing

Hamilton

Sundstrand

Windsor Locks,

Connecticut, USA

Nitrogen generating

system

Boeing

Hartwell

Corporation

Placentia,

California, USA

Nacelle and crewescape

hatch latching

systems

Boeing

Hawker de

Havilland, a

subsidiary of

Boeing

(Australia)

Melbourne and

Sydney, Australia

Moveable trailing

Edges

Boeing

Honeywell

Aerospace

Phoenix, Arizona,

USA

Navigation system

Boeing

Honeywell

Aerospace

Phoenix , Arizona,

USA

Flight control

Electronics

Boeing

Honeywell

Aerospace

Phoenix , Arizona,

USA

Engine nacelle anti-ice

Regulator

Boeing

Honeywell

Aerospace

Phoenix , Arizona,USA

Astreon LED systems

for navigation/anticollision

lighting

Boeing

Honeywell

Aerospace

Phoenix , Arizona,

USA

Cargo bay lighting

Boeing

Ipeco

Southend-on-Sea,

Essex, UK

Cockpit Seats

Boeing

Jamco

Tokyo, Japan

Lavatories

Boeing

Jamco

Tokyo, Japan

Flight deck door

Boeing

Jamco

Tokyo, Japan

Flight deck bulkhead

Boeing

Jamco

Tokyo, Japan

Flight deck interiors

including linings,

consoles and stowage

Boeing

Rockwell

Collins

Cedar Rapids,

Iowa, Japan

Pilot controls

Boeing

Kawasaki

Nagoya, Japan

Fixed trailing edge

Boeing

Kawasaki

Nagoya, Japan

Forward fuselage (43)

Boeing

Kawasaki

Nagoya, Japan

Main landing gear

wheel well (45)

Boeing

Kidde

Technologies

Wilson, North

Carolina, USA

Smoke/fire detection &

extinguishing systems

Boeing

Korry

Electronics

Seattle,

Washington, USA

Flight deck control

Panels

Boeing

Korean Air

Lines

Aerospace

Division

Seoul, Korea

Wing tips

Boeing

Labinal

Production will be

carried out at

multiple Labinal

sites in North

America including

Pryor, Oklahoma,

Corinth, Texas

and Chihuahua,

Mexico.

Electrical wiring

Systems

Boeing

Latecoere

Toulouse, France

Passenger doors

Boeing

Liebherr-

Aerospace

Lindenberg,

Germany

Environmental control

system components

Boeing

LMI Aerospace

St

Charles, Missouri, USA

Sheet metal parts

Boeing

Messier-

Bugatti

Velizy-

Villacoublay,

France

Electric brake system

Boeing

Magellan

Aerospace

Toronto, Canada

Nose landing gear

drag brace assembly,

steering assembly,

landing gear torsion

link assembly

Boeing

Messier-Dowty

Velizy-

Villacoublay,

France

Main/nose landing

Gear

Boeing

Michelin

Greenville, South

Carolina, USA

Tyres

Boeing

Mitsubishi

Heavy

Industries

Nagoya, Japan

Wing

Boeing

Mitsubishi

Heavy

Industries

Nagoya, Japan

Wing Box

Boeing

Monogram

Systems

(Zodiac)

Carson, California,

USA

Water and waste

System

Boeing

Moog

Aurora, New York,

USA

Primary flight control

actuation system

Boeing

Panasonic

Avionics

Lake Forest,

California, USA.

System production

facilities in Osaka,

Japan

In-flight entertainment

System

Boeing

Parker

Aerospace

Nichols

Airborne

Division

Devens,

Massachusetts,

USA

Pumps, reservoirs,

and filtration for the

forward cargo air

conditioning system

Boeing

Stratoflex

Products

Parker

Aerospace

Fort Worth,

Texas, USA

Fluid conveyance

products for engines

and other flow control

devices.

Boeing

PFW

Speyer,

Germany,

Izmir, Turkey

Farnborough, UK.

Metallic tubing/ducting

Boeing

PPG

Aerospace

Huntsville,

Alabama, USA

Electro-chromic

window technology

Boeing

Rockwell

Collins

Cedar Rapids,

Iowa, USA

SATCOM system

Boeing

Rockwell

Collins

Cedar Rapids,

Iowa, USA

Communications/surv

eillance system

Boeing

Rockwell

Collins

Cedar Rapids,

Iowa, USA

Crew alerting system

Boeing

Rockwell

Collins

Cedar Rapids,

Iowa, USA

Common Data

Network

Boeing

Rockwell

Collins

Cedar Rapids,

Iowa, USA

Pilot controls

Boeing

Saab

Aerostructures

Linkoping,

Sweden

Doors

Boeing

Sierracin

Sylmar

Sylmar, California,

USA

Cockpit windows

Boeing

General

Electric

Aviation

(formerly

Smiths

Aerospace)

Washington State,

USA

Wolverhampton,

UK

Landing gear

actuation system

Boeing

General

Electric

Aviation

(formerly

Smiths

Aerospace

Wolverhampton,

UK

High lift actuation

System

Boeing

General

Electric

Aviation

(formerly

Smiths

Aerospace)

Wolverhampton,

UK

Common core system

Boeing

General

Electric

Aviation

(formerly

Smiths

Aerospace)

Wolverhampton,

UK

Leading/trailing edge

power drive unit

Boeing

Toray

Industries

Tokyo, Japan

Composite material

Boeing

ASCO

Aerospace

Canada

Delta, British

Columbia, Canada

Structures

Boeing

Western Filter

Valencia,

California, USA

Hydraulic System

Filters

Boeing

Ultra

Electronics

Middlesex,Uk

Electro-thermal wing

ice protection

SCOR MODEL FOR BOEING 787

The SCOR model of Boeing include 5 steps : Plan, Source, Make, Deliver and Return

Plan include: Demand/Supply Planning And Management. Align The Supply Chain Unit Plan With The Financial Plan

Price & Volume

Recent Price $

72.43

52 Week High $

76.00

52 Week Low $

38.92

Average Vol (Mil) (RTMA)

6.16

Beta

1.31

Share Related Items

Market Cap. (Mil) $

54,977.01

Shares Out (Mil)

759.04

Float (Mil)

553.01

Dividend Information

Yield %

2.30

Annual Dividend

1.68

Payout Ratio (TTM) %

101.00

Financial Strength

Quick Ratio (MRQ)

0.50

Current Ratio (MRQ)

1.10

LT Debt/Equity (MRQ)

390.00

Total Debt/Equity (MRQ)

440.00

Valuation Ratios

Price/Earnings (TTM)

43.60

Price/Sales (TTM)

0.82

Price/Book (MRQ)

18.67

Price/Cash Flow (TTM)

18.80

Per Share Data

Earnings (TTM) $

1.66

Sales (TTM) $

88.26

Book Value (MRQ) $

3.88

Cash Flow (TTM) $

3.85

Cash (MRQ) $

5.96

Mgmt Effectiveness

Return on Equity (TTM)

41.50

Return on Assets (TTM)

1.90

Return on Investment (TTM)

8.50

Profitability

Gross Margin (TTM) %

20.50

EBIT Margin (TTM) %

3.40

Profit Margin (TTM) %

1.80

787 Progress –Achieved initial airworthiness

–3rd and 4th airplanes joined flight-test program

–Completed flutter and ground-effects testing

–Completed ultimate-load wing test

Boeing Capital Corporation Supporting business units while prudently managing portfolio and risk Portfolio run-off, pre-payments and depreciation exceeded new financings, reducing portfolio to $5.4 billion from $5.7 billion during the quarter Delivered pre-tax income of $46 million in the quarter.

Other and Unallocated Expense Income tax expense higher due to health care legislation Unallocated expenses increased driven by higher deferred compensation Higher interest expense due to increased debt levels from last year Other segment expense increased to $50 million on environmental expense

Source : Sourcing Stocked, Make-To-Order, And Engineer-To-Order Product. Manage Business Rules, Assess Supplier Performance, And Maintain Data.

Unparalleled Performance

The 787 will provide airlines with unmatched fuel efficiency, resulting in exceptional environmental performance. The airplane will use 20 percent less fuel for comparable missions than today's similarly sized airplane. It will also travel at speeds similar to today's fastest wide bodies, Mach 0.85. Passengers will also see improvements with the new airplane, from an interior environment with higher humidity to increased comfort and convenience.

Performance is a suite of new technologies being developed by Boeing and its international technology development team. Boeing has announced that as much as 50 percent of the primary structure including the fuselage and wing - on the 787 will be made of composite materials. Boeing has selected General Electric and Rolls-Royce to develop engines for the new airplane. It is expected that advances in engine technology will contribute as much as 8 percent of the increased efficiency of the new airplane, representing a nearly two-generation jump in technology for the middle of the market.

New technologies and processes are in development to help Boeing and its supplier partners achieve unprecedented levels of performance at every phase of the program.

Make: Make-To-Stock, Make-To order, And Engineer-To-Order Production Execution Schedule Production Activities, Issue Product, Produce And Test, Package, Stage Product, And Release Product To Deliver

Boeing manufacturing

The Boeing 747, 767, 777 and 787 airplanes are manufactured in Everett, Wash., which is located 30 miles (48 kilometers) north of Seattle, near Snohomish County's Paine Field. Paine Field is a regional airport with a 9,000-foot (2,743-meter) runway

The Everett factory accommodates production lines for the 747, 767, 777 and 787 airplanes. Production rates vary with market activity, but have been as high as seven per month for the 747 and 777 and five per month for the 767. Other manufacturing production areas at the Everett site include the paint hangars. Approximately 30,000 people on three shifts work at the Everett site.

Boeing performs pre-flight tests on all twin-aisle airplanes before the airplanes make their initial test flight at Paine Field. Following the test flight, the airplanes undergo final preparations at the Everett flight line before delivery to customers.

Today, more than 2,600 of the 3,000-plus airplanes assembled at the Everett site are in service. That represents more than 80 percent of the worldwide fleet. Because of its size and magnitude, the Everett plant represents Boeing to the world.

The Boeing Everett tour, which is operated through the Future of Flight Aviation Center & Boeing Tour, is located just north of the Everett site in Mukilteo, Wash. The center is open year-round to the public and hosts more than 180,000 people annually Component Exchange Programs Minimize and repair And Inventory Costs.

A Better Way To Manage Repairs And Inventory.

With our Component Exchange Programs, you minimize component repair and inventory costs, and no longer need to worry about repair turn time. Boeing holds hundreds of replacement components, which are tested and overhauled to standards set by the original equipment manufacturer and are ready to ship within 24 hours of your order. This means you can trim inventory, which reduces holding costs and lets you put the capital to better use.

Reduce repair costs of line replaceable units. Component Exchange Programs offer a read supply of dispatch-critical units manufactured by Boeing and Boeing suppliers, including the high-value components that typically account for a large part of spares expense. At no additional charge to you, Boeing manages the repair, testing, and recertification of these units reducing your costs.

Minimize service time. By taking advantage of our next-day shipping. With Component Exchange Programs, a replacement can be route to your site before the damaged unit is even removed from the airplane, and you are no longer forced to cover lengthy repair turn times with in-stock inventory. Component Exchange Programs serve as a single point of contact for dozens of original equipment manufacturers, reducing your administrative burden for warranties, service, and deliveries. Parts will be automatically shipped from the service center that provides the quickest response.

Deliver: Order, Warehouse, Transportation, And Installation Management For Stocked, Make-To-Order, And Engineer-To-Order Product. Manage Deliver Business Rules, Performance, Information, Finished Product Inventories, Capital Assets, Transportation, Product Life Cycle, And Import/Export Requirements.

Major Customer :- Order performance of Boeing 787 (2010).

Orders 777 787 Total

Net Orders 27 15 112

Ethiopian Airlines 10

Somon Air 2

Turkish Airlines 20

Unidentified Customer(s) 34 37

United Airlines 25 25

Virgin Blue Airlines 40

Gross Orders 34 25 134

Changes -7 -10 -22

Net Orders 27 15 112

777 787 Total

Boeing International Shipment Route

Region-1 (Italy)

Shipment

Freight Forwarder

Transit Time –Air Door To Door

Transit Time Ocean Port To Port

Air Ocean EAR controlled Shipment

DHL-Global Forwarder –Primary

DB Schenker- Secondary

Direct Iata:2-6days

Consolidated: 3-8days

30-35 Days

ITAR Controlled Shipment

Ceva Logistics

Db Schenker

DHL Global Forwarder

Kintetsu World express

Nippon Express

Direct IATA: 2-6 Days

Consolidated:3-8 Days

30-35 Days

Region-2

Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, Luxemburg, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland

Shipment

Freight Forwarder

Transit Time –Air Door To Door

Transit Time Ocean Port To Port

Air Or

Ocean

Ear Controlled

Shipments

Db Schenker - Primary

DHL Global Forwarding -Secondary

Direct IATA: 2–4 Days

Consolidated: 3–7 Days

30–35 Days

ITAR Controlled Shipments

Ceva Logistics

Db Schenker

DHL Global Forwarding

Kintetsu World Express

Kuehne & Nagel

Nippon Express

Panalpina

UPS–SCS

Direct IATA: 2–4 Days

Consolidated: 3–7 Days

30–35 Days

Region 3

Bahrain, Iraq, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Qatar, United Arab Emirates. Afghanistan

Shipment

Freight Forwarder

Transit Time –Air Door To Door

Transit Time Ocean Port To Port

Air Or

Ocean

EAR Controlled

Shipments

DHL Global Forwarding - Primary

UPS–SCS - Secondary

Direct IATA: 2–6 Days

Consolidated: 3–8 Days

30–35 Days

Shipments

CEVA Logistics

DB Schenker

DHL Global Forwarding

Kintetsu World Express

Kuehne & Nagel

Nippon Express

Panalpina

UPS–SCS

Direct IATA: 2–6 Days

Consolidated: 3–8 Days

30–35 Days

Region 4

Singapore

Shipment

Freight Forwarder

Transit Time –Air Door To Door

Transit Time Ocean Port To Port

Air Or

Ocean

EAR Controlled

Shipments

CEVA Logistics – Primary

DB Schenker - Secondary

Direct IATA: 2–5 Days

Consolidated: 3–6 Days

30–35 Days

ITAR Controlled Shipments

CEVA Logistics

DB Schenker

DHL Global Forwarding

Kintetsu World Express

Kuehne & Nagel

Nippon Express

Panalpina

UPS–SCS

Direct IATA: 2–5 Days

Consolidated: 3–6 Days

30–35 Days

Region 5

Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand

Shipment

Freight Forwarder

Transit Time –Air Door To Door

Transit Time Ocean Port To Port

Air Or

Ocean

EAR Controlled

Shipments

DB Schenker – Primary

CEVA Logistics – Secondary

Direct IATA: 2–5 Days

Consolidated: 3–7 Days

30–35 Days

ITAR Controlled Shipments

CEVA Logistics

DB Schenker

DHL Global Forwarding

Kintetsu World Express

Kuehne & Nagel

Nippon Express

Panalpina

UPS–SCS

Direct IATA: 2-5 Days

Consolidated: 3–7 Days

30–35 Days

Region 6

Mexico, Central America, South America

Shipment

Freight Forwarder

Transit Time –Air Door To Door

Transit Time Ocean Port To Port

Air Or

Ocean

EAR Controlled

Shipments

DHL Global Forwarding - Primary

DB Schenker - Secondary

Direct IATA: 2–5 Days

Consolidated: 3–8 Days

30–35 Days

ITAR Controlled Shipments

CEVA Logistics

DB Schenker

DHL Global Forwarding

Kintetsu World Express

Kuehne & Nagel

Nippon Express

Panalpina

UPS–SCS

Direct IATA: 2–5 Days

Consolidated: 3–8 Days

30–35 Days

Boeing Security Guidelines for International Suppliers/Shippers.

Security requirements and guidelines are provided to international shippers to institute effective security practices designed to ensure supply chain security to mitigate the risk of loss, theft, and contraband smuggling that could potentially introduce terrorists and implements of terrorism into the global supply chain.

The following security criteria, as outlined by the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP), identify areas and opportunities for ensuring security of the supply chain supporting Boeing:

Business Partnerships/Use of Sub-Contractors.

Supplier/Shipper shall ensure that they and any sub-contracted supplier/shipper or logistics service provider involved in handling any shipment being sent directly to the U.S. (for which Boeing is the U.S. Importer of Record) employs security practices which ensure the security of such shipments. If supplier/shipper sub-contracts with other suppliers/shippers or logistics service providers engaged in manufacturing, packaging, or transport of Boeing shipments directly to the U.S., the supplier/shipper must have documented processes for the selection of such business partners to ensure that they are a viable business that will provide adequate supply chain security.

International suppliers/shippers should ensure that any business partners involved in handling shipments to Boeing be knowledgeable of and demonstrate that they are meeting the Boeing C-TPAT Security Guidelines this may be accomplished via written/electronic confirmation.

Physical Security

Supplier/Shipper facilities must have physical security deterrents that protect against unauthorized access. Physical security deterrents employed by international suppliers/shippers may include, but are not limited to, the following elements:

2.1 Fencing

All fencing and walls should be regularly inspected and maintained. Best practices also include internal securing of shipping and receiving areas via fencing, locking doors, or other access controls.

2.2 Gates/Entries

The number of gates should be kept to the minimum necessary for proper access and safety controls.

2.3 Guards

Guards or access controls should be in place to ensure that unauthorized personnel do not enter the facility or gain access to Boeing shipments.

2.4 Parking Controls

Private passenger vehicles should be prohibited from parking in or adjacent to shipping and receiving areas to prevent unauthorized materials from being introduced into shipments or conveyance vehicles.

2.5 Locking Devices and Key Controls

External and internal windows, gates, and doors through which unauthorized personnel could access the facility or cargo storage areas must be secured with locking devices. Management or security personnel should control the issuance of all locks and keys.

2.6 Lighting

Adequate lighting must be provided inside and outside the facility to prevent unauthorized access.

2.7 Alarms Systems and Video Surveillance Cameras

Alarm systems and video surveillance cameras should be utilized where necessary to monitor premises and prevent unauthorized access to cargo handling and storage areas.

Access Controls

Access controls must prevent unauthorized entry to facilities, maintain control of employees and visitors, and protect Boeing’s assets.

3.1 Access Devices

Procedures should be in place and documented for the issuance, removal and changing of access devices.

3.2 Deliveries

Proper vendor identification and/or photo identification must be presented upon arrival by all vendors for documentation purposes. Controls should be in place to ensure vendor access is limited to the areas necessary to perform their duties.

3.3 Challenging and Removing Unauthorized Persons

Procedures should be in place to identify, challenge and address unauthorized/unidentified persons.

4. Personnel Security

Screen prospective employees consistent with local regulations. Verify employment application information prior to employment.

4.1 Background Checks / Investigations

Background checks should be conducted for potential employees. Such checks may include; educational and employment background, criminal records and other information to confirm the identification of potential employees.

4.2 Personnel Termination Procedures

Companies must have procedures in place to remove badges, uniforms, and facility and IT system access for terminated employees.

5. Ocean Container and Truck Trailer Security

Container and trailer security must be maintained to protect against the introduction of unauthorized material and/or persons. For suppliers/shippers that stuff/load the ocean container at their facility, procedures must be in place to properly seal and maintain the security of shipping containers and trailers at the point of stuffing. A high security seal must be affixed to all access doors on truck trailers (from Canada or Mexico) and ocean containers bound for the U.S. All seals must meet or exceed the current PAS ISO 17712 standard for high security seals.

5.1 Ocean Container and Truck Trailer Inspection:

If the supplier/shipper is responsible for stuffing ocean containers or truck trailers destined for Boeing, an inspection must be conducted on the ocean container or truck trailer prior to stuffing, including the reliability of the locking mechanisms of the doors. A seven-point inspection process is recommended for all containers:

Front wall, Left side, Right side, Floor, Ceiling/Roof, Inside/outside doors, Outside/Undercarriage

5.2 Ocean Container and Truck Trailer Storage:

Ocean containers and truck trailers under the supplier’s/shipper’s control or located in a facility of the supplier/shipper must be stored in a secure area to prevent unauthorized access and/or manipulation.

5.3 Security and Control of Container and Trailer Seals

The international supplier/shipper must affix a high security seal to all fully loaded ocean containers or truck trailers (i.e. from Canada or Mexico) bound for the U.S. when such trailers and containers are stuffed at the supplier’s/shipper’s location. International suppliers/shippers must have documented procedures in place to manage, control and record the issuance and use of high security bolt seals.

6. Information Technology (IT) Security

Security measures must be in place to ensure automated systems are protected from unauthorized access.

6.1 Password Protection

Automated systems should use individually assigned accounts that require a periodic change of password. IT security policies, procedures and standards should be in place and provided to employees in the form of training.

6.2 Accountability

A system should be in place to identify the abuse of IT including improper access, tampering or the altering of business data. All system violators should be subject to appropriate disciplinary actions for abuse.

7. Shipping and Receiving Security Procedures

Procedures should be in place to ensure that departing cargo is verified against purchase or delivery orders. Include a documented process to ensure accurate piece count, weight and part numbers and verification that contraband is not present. Drivers picking up cargo should be positively identified before cargo is released.

7.1 Shipping and Packaging Security Procedures

Documented procedures should be in place to control the access to shipping and packaging areas. Once packaged, all shipments should be securely controlled to prevent unauthorized access and the possible introduction of any contraband items.

Shipment Routing

International suppliers/shippers shall follow all Incoterms routing, and International Shipment Routing Instructions provided by Boeing. If the international supplier/shipper does not control the routing of the goods between the point of origin and the point of delivery to Boeing, the foreign supplier/shipper is not responsible for supply chain security beyond the point of shipment transfer per the Incoterms. On U.S. bound Boeing shipments coordinated by the supplier/shipper; international suppliers/shippers shall use transportation freight forwarders and carriers who are either C-TPAT certified or who meet the Boeing C-TPAT Security Guidelines.

Return Include :- Return Of Raw Materials And Receipt Of Returns Of Finished Goods Manage Return Business Rules, Performance, Data Collection, Return Inventory, Capital Assets, Transportation, Network Configuration, And Regulatory Requirements And Compliance.

Fleet modification.

Programs bear the cost of incorporating selected configuration changes, which minimizes the chance that you will stock outdated parts. Program parts will be upgraded as necessary with the latest modifications. Absolute airworthiness. Boeing guarantees that every part meets the specifications and performance standards of the original manufacturer and is certified by regulatory agencies.

Supplier Network Technical Data Interchange (SNET-TDI)

Boeing is currently in the process of migrating all existing supplier network technical data interchange (SNET-TDI) user onto the electronic file delivery system. All new user will use electronic file delivery system. Existing TDI access will not be stopped or disrupted until successful migration is completed.

What makes SNET a cost effective business process is the ability to:-

transmit large files (upwards of 10GB)

transmit any type of file from anywhere in the company

use strong encryption to ensure security of sensitive data

transmit data to a variety of supplier communications platforms

If a supplier wants to start posturing themselves, ahead of time, to use SNET-TDI to transfer files between their site and Boeing, they should start by doing the following. Keeping in mind, just because a supplier is ready and capable of using SNET-TDI to transfer files, it doesn't necessarily mean they will automatically be in line to receive more work from Boeing.

Ask the Boeing Contract Administrator or Buyer if current or projected contracts create a solid enough business case for moving forward:-

Ask the Boeing Contract Administrator or Buyer to contact one of the SNET-TDI Business Requirements support focal and request the connection.

At the supplier site, identify a PC that can be used as a communications platform. This can be any hardware (PC, RS6000 etc.) that has a modem, access to the internet and TCP/IP FTP capability.

Purchase a copy of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) encryption software or order a copy through the Boeing SNET-TDI group.

Ask the Boeing Contract Administrator or Buyer to verify that the Boeing PQAA database has been updated with the supplier's current CAD/CAM configuration.

Download a copy of the Electronic Commerce Trading Partner Agreement from the SNET-TDI web site and become familiar with its content.

CONCLUSION TO SCOR MODEL OF BOEING 787:

Thus, SCOR Model i.e Supply chain Operational reference Model include the 5 steps which help the company to reduce the cost of delivering the product and importing the parts to manufacture it from various countries. Boeing import almost every part from all over the world mostly from Canada, china and Japan. The above have being describe about the SCOR model which defines the planning, making, source, delivery and reference of manufacturing of Boeing 787 from planning of the finances of the aircraft, the sources of finance maintaining the data of supplier, making the data available to the suppliers, the delivering process of the parts. and the returns from the suppliers that is the efficient network.

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