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Scheme of Work History Rich and Poor Tudors

This scheme of work focuses on the Tudor period in Britain, and specifically on the lifestyles of rich and poor Tudors. The unit begins by focusing on ‘The Prince and the Pauper’ by Mark Twain, as this is set in Tudor times and demonstrates some of the differences between the lives of rich and poor Tudors. The illustrations also allow children to visualise what Tudor clothing and houses looked like. The unit aims to develop children’s skills in comparing two aspects of society, and children will describe these comparisons through art, literacy, ICT and D & T. Children will have the opportunity to explore Tudor building design and design and make their own model Tudor house using a variety of media. They will also have the opportunity to study the clothing of various Tudors using the Internet and books and then design their own Tudor costume. Literacy is a key element of this unit, and children will develop their imaginative writing skills in a variety of ways, using information they have discovered on internet scavenger hunts, in books and from evidence in the story of ‘The Prince and the Pauper’.

History- Rich and Poor Tudors- focusing on the story of

‘The Prince and the Pauper’ by Mark Twain.

National Curriculum Objectives Breadth of Study

Every Child Matters

H8a – To be taught about...Britain and the wider world in Tudor times.

H8b – Learn about the histories of England...and the wider world.

H10 – Study some significant events and individuals including Tudor monarchs, who shaped this period and of the everyday lives of men, women and children from different sections of society.

Be healthy- Children will have the opportunity to compare their lifestyles with those of the wealthy and poor Tudors.

Stay safe- In art and D & T, children should be aware of using scissors in a safe way.

Enjoy & achieve- Children should enjoy learning about another period in time and the variety of learning experiences within the unit.

Make a positive contribution- Children will create a variety of pieces of work which will make a positive contribution to our whole class display work.

Skills

Cross Curricular Links

Key Themes

Comparing and contrasting different cultures, historical periods and societies.

Speaking and listening skills.

Developing skills in art, ICT and D & T.

Writing skills- discussing what it is like as a Tudor (wealthy or poor).

Using the internet and books to research and develop knowledge and understanding.

Literacy ICT

Art D & T

Tudors on a historical timeline.

Tudor wealth and poverty.

Tudor buildings.

Tudor inventories.

Poor Tudors.

Wealthy Tudors.

Prior Learning

Year 3D have already studied a topic on Ancient Egyptians. Children have prior knowledge of a past culture and period in history.

Year 3D have used the internet and other ICT resources to complete scavenger hunts to research information.

Year 3D have made comparisons between their cultures and the world around them with other past cultures and times in history.

Future Learning

This unit will help to develop children’s skills in comparing and contrasting other historical periods and cultures to their own; identifying differences in societies; developing ways of researching into other historical periods and cultures (i.e. for the Vikings topic in Summer term).

Vocabulary

Tudor, prince, pauper, rich, poor, society, timeline, wealthy, inventory, hygiene, health, leisure, pastimes, advantage, disadvantage, occupation, building, internal, external, stately home, comfortable, poverty, almshouses, orphan, deserving poor, lazy poor, oak timber, wattle and daub, jettying, nobility.

Assessment Opportunities

At the end of the unit:

Most children will:

Have an understanding of Britain and the wider world in Tudor times;

Recognise the differences between the rich and the poor in Tudor times.

Some children will not have made so much progress and will:

Have a more limited understanding of life in Tudor times and be able to discuss some of the differences between rich and poor Tudors.

Some more able children will have progressed further and will also:

Be able to discuss in detail the differences between the rich and the poor in Tudor times, be able to relate this to the story of ‘The Prince and the Pauper’ and make comparisons between life in Tudor times and their own lives in modern day Britain.

Year 3 History

Rich and Poor Tudors

Lesson 1 of 7

Cross Curricular Links:

Literacy- Introducing the children to the Tudor period through a story set in that historical period. Speaking and listening skills- pair and share work, small group work, feeding back ideas to class.

Learning Objective:

To be able to place the Tudors on a timeline and be able to identify features of this historical period.

National Curriculum Objectives:

Resources:

H1a- place events, people and changes into correct periods of time

H1b- use dates and vocabulary relating to the passing of time, including ancient, modern, BC, AD, century and decade

‘The Prince and the Pauper’ book by Mark Twain (Usborne edition).

Interactive timeline on ActivPrimary

Tudors mindmap sheet for each child.

Activities:

Assessment Questions:

Vocabulary:

Ask children what they already know about the Tudors, then list ideas on IWB as a mindmap.

Locate Tudor period on a timeline from the birth of Jesus. Compare with where Ancient Egypt appears on timeline. Mark on some significant events in Tudor times- the reigns of some Tudor monarchs.

Introduce children to life in Tudor times by reading ‘The Prince and the Pauper’ by Mark Twain.

Children to create own mindmap of what they know so far about life in Tudor times.

Can children place the Tudors on a timeline?

Can children make suggestions as to what they think life would have been like in Tudor times?

Are children able to give facts they know about the Tudor period?

Tudors

Timeline

Monarch

Reign

Pauper

Wealthy

Success Criteria:

All children should:

Be able to complete a mindmap on the worksheet and state what they already know about the Tudors (Modified group to be supported by the teaching assistant.)

Most children should:

Be able to place the Tudors on a historical timeline and complete a mindmap on the worksheet, stating what they already know about the Tudors.

Some children should:

Be able to place the Tudors on a historical timeline and complete a mindmap on the worksheet, stating what they know about the Tudors, how life in Tudor times would have been different to life today and what they think the main differences were between rich and poor Tudors.

Year 3 History

Rich and Poor Tudors

Lesson 2 of 7

Cross Curricular Links:

Literacy- labeling a picture of a Tudor person using appropriate vocabulary and interpreting historical information into a picture. Refer to the story ‘The Prince and the Pauper’- observe the illustrations in the book to give clues about what rich and poor Tudors wore.

Art- to be able to interpret historical information onto n image of a rich or a poor Tudor person using a variety of media and materials.

Learning Objective:

To distinguish between wealth and poverty in Tudor times.

National Curriculum Objectives:

Resources:

H2a- about characteristic features of the periods and societies studied, including the ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children in the past.

H2b- about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the societies studied, in Britain and the wider world.

H5a- recall, select and organise historical information.

‘The Prince and the Pauper’ book

ActivPrimary presentation inc. W. Harrison’s ‘Description of England’.

Picture cards of rich and poor Tudors.

A3 paper, card, variety of art materials to design and create a Tudor person image.

Activities:

Assessment Questions:

Vocabulary:

Class discussion about life for the rich and the poor in Tudor times, making reference to ‘The Prince and the Pauper’ to show the comparisons.

Look at William Harrison’s ‘Description of England’, showing the hierarchy of jobs in Tudor Britain.

Using a variety of sources and evidence, children to identify rich and poor Tudors. Children to sort pictures into categories: rich/poor people; townspeople/country people/; people at work/ people at leisure.

Children to create a detailed picture of a Tudor person using a variety of media and materials.

Can children identify the differences between wealth and poverty in Tudor Britain?

Can children identify the characteristics of rich and poor Tudors?

Can children communicate their knowledge in a variety of ways?

Pauper Gentleman

Wealthy Nobleman

Labourer Citizen

Farmer Privileges

Yeomen Servant

Vagrant

Success Criteria:

All children should:

Be able to draw and label a detailed picture of a rich or poor Tudor person, using internet, books and other sources of evidence to inform their design. Children should use a variety of media and art materials.

Most children should:

Be able to draw and a detailed picture of a rich and a poor Tudor person, using internet, books and other sources of evidence to inform their design. Children should label the differences between the poor person and the rich person.

Some children should:

Be able to draw and a detailed picture of a rich and a poor Tudor person, using internet, books and other sources of evidence to inform their design. Children should write a detailed description under each to describe what shows they are rich or poor.

Year 3 History

Rich and Poor Tudors

Lesson 3 of 7

(across two lessons)

Cross Curricular Links:

ICT- use of the Internet, Google maps and Google street view to discover the location of Tudor settlements and any existing Tudor buildings.

Literacy- Linking back to the story of ‘The Prince and the Pauper’. Using evidence read in the test to inform D & T work.

Art and D & T- Designing and making a model Tudor house.

Learning Objective:

To identify the features of Tudor buildings and identify how comfortable they would have been.

National Curriculum Objectives:

Resources:

H2b- about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the societies studied, in Britain and the wider world.

H2a- about the characteristic features of the periods and societies studied, including the ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children in the past.

H5c- communicate their knowledge and understanding of history in a variety of ways.

Books and picture cards showing examples of Tudor buildings.

ICT suite- Internet, Google maps, Google street view.

Materials to represent Tudor building techniques- wattle and daub, card, plaster, sticks, paint.

Activities:

Assessment Questions:

Vocabulary:

Class to discuss what they think Tudor houses would have been like. Chn to pair and share their ideas.

Examine pictures of interior and exterior features of Tudor houses, including wealthy and stately homes on internet. How did Tudors build their houses? Investigate wattle and daub. Children to discuss the pictures- is it a wealthy house or a poor house? Who do you think may have lived there? Where might we find Tudor houses in the UK now? Google maps and street view.

Discuss ‘The Prince and the Pauper’. Where did characters live?

Using information gathered, chn to design and make their own Tudor house using interpretive Tudor house building methods.

Can children use Internet Explorer to research and gather information relating to Tudor houses?

Can children make inferences about the lifestyles of different types of Tudor people?

Can children interpret this information and create a model house which incorporates aspects of Tudor design?

Interior/exterior

Jettying

Wattle and daub

Wealthy

Building method

Success Criteria:

All children should:

Be able to complete an Internet scavenger hunt, researching Tudor buildings of rich and poor people and use the information gathered to design and make a model of a Tudor poor house with adult support.

Most children should:

Be able to complete an Internet scavenger hunt, researching Tudor buildings of rich and poor people and use the information gathered to design a model Tudor poor house with labels and build using appropriate resources.

Some children should:

Be able to complete an Internet scavenger hunt, researching Tudor buildings of rich and poor people and use the information gathered to design a model Tudor wealthy house with detailed description and build using resources.

Year 3 History

Rich and Poor Tudors

Lesson 4 of 7

Cross Curricular Links:

ICT- Children to use Word to create a Tudor style inventory, thinking about the style of font, layout, bullets and numbering.

Learning Objective:

To use inventories to find out about the lives of people in the Tudor period.

National Curriculum Objectives:

Resources:

H4a- how to find out about the events, people and changes studied from an appropriate range of sources of information, including ICT-based sources [for example, documents, printed sources, CD-ROMS, databases, pictures and photographs, music, artefacts, historic buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites.

H2b- about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the societies studied, in Britain and the wider world

H2a- about characteristic features of the periods and societies studied, including the ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children in the past.

Interactive whiteboard.

Examples of Tudor inventories for a poor and a wealthy house.

ICT suite.

Pictures of a room from a poor house and from a wealthy house.

Activities:

Assessment Questions:

Vocabulary:

Teacher to explain what an inventory is and what it was used for in Tudor times. To explain the purpose of inventories, give children 5 minutes to make an inventory of the classroom, listing as many objects in the room as they can.

On IWB, show children an inventory from a Tudor house. Ask children to discuss whether the owner was rich or poor and why.

Give children two pictures from rooms in Tudor houses, one for a wealthy person, and one for a poor person. Using Word on ICT suite computers, children to create an inventory for each house and decide whether it is a poor or wealthy owner.

Do children know what an inventory is and what it was used for?

Can children use evidence in inventories to make inferences about people’s lifestyles?

Are children able to use features of Word to recreate a Tudor style inventory?

Inventory

Font

Layout

Success Criteria:

All children should:

Be able to create a Tudor style inventory using Word on the computer using evidence found in the pictures of the Tudor rooms.

Most children should:

Be able to create a Tudor style inventory using Word on the computer using evidence found in the pictures of the Tudor rooms and make inferences about who they think may have lived in that house.

Some children should:

Be able to create a Tudor style inventory using Word on the computer using evidence found in the pictures of the Tudor rooms and write a description about what type of person lived in the house, their job and leisure activities.

Year 3 History

Rich and Poor Tudors

Lesson 5 of 7

(Across two lessons)

Cross Curricular Links:

Literacy- comparing and contrasting elements of the story ‘The Prince and the Pauper’. Writing a letter to the prince.

Speaking & listening- hot seating activity.

Learning Objective:

To find out what life would have been like for poor people living in Tudor times.

National Curriculum Objectives:

Resources:

H2a- about characteristic features of the periods and societies studied, including the ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children in the past.

H2b- about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the societies studied, in Britain and the wider world.

H4a- how to find out about the events, people and changes studied from an appropriate range of sources of information, including ICT-based sources [for example, documents, printed sources, CD-ROMS, databases, pictures and photographs, music, artefacts, historic buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites.

‘The Prince and the Pauper’ book.

Tudor poor outfit for teacher.

Tea-stained Tudor style paper for letters to prince.

Tudor games to play

Activities:

Assessment Questions:

Vocabulary:

Ask children what they think life would have been like for a poor person living in Tudor times. Children to discuss ideas and mindmap on board.

Children to consider what life was like for the pauper in ‘The Prince and the Pauper’. Would they rather live the life of the prince or the pauper?

Children to form questions to ask the teacher during the hot seating activity (teacher dressed up as a poor Tudor). What would they like to find out about life as a poor Tudor? (Health, hygiene, food, clothing..)

Children to use the information gathered to write their own letter to the prince as if they were the pauper, telling him about his life and what he does.

Children to sample some of the games and activities which might have been enjoyed by poor Tudors.

Can children make inferences about what life was like for poor Tudors?

Can children explain some of the rich Tudor’s attitudes towards poor Tudors?

Can the children make comparisons between evidence about poor Tudors and the pauper in the story?

Poor

Pauper

Wealthy

Almshouses

Orphanage

Health

Hygiene

Success Criteria:

All children should:

Be able to identify how poor Tudors lived and write a letter to the prince as if they were the pauper.

Most children should:

Be able to identify how poor Tudors lived and write a letter to the prince as if they were the pauper, making inferences about their life as a pauper based on the information they have discovered.

Some children should:

Be able to identify how poor Tudors lived and write a letter to the prince as if they were the pauper, making inferences about their life as a pauper based on the information they have discovered and explain some of the rich Tudor’s attitudes towards them being a pauper.

Year 3 History

Rich and Poor Tudors

Lesson 6 of 7

(Across two lessons)

Cross Curricular Links:

Literacy- comparing and contrasting elements of the story ‘The Prince and the Pauper’. Writing a postcard to the pauper.

Art- designing the front of a postcard, including features of a rich person’s house.

ICT- Internet scavenger hunt.

Learning Objective:

To find out about the lives of rich people in Tudor times.

National Curriculum Objectives:

Resources:

H2a- about characteristic features of the periods and societies studied, including the ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children in the past.

H2b- about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the societies studied, in Britain and the wider world.

H4a- how to find out about the events, people and changes studied from an appropriate range of sources of information, including ICT-based sources [for example, documents, printed sources, CD-ROMS, databases, pictures and photographs, music, artefacts, historic buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites.

ICT suite.

Internet scavenger hunt research sheet.

Card to create a postcard from the prince to the pauper.

Art materials to design and create a picture for the postcard.

Activities:

Assessment Questions:

Vocabulary:

Ask the children what they think life would have been like for rich people living in Tudor times. Mindmap class ideas on IWB.

Divide the class into 4 groups and allocate one of the categories (clothing; entertainment/hobbies; food; health and hygiene). Children to use the Internet to research these categories for rich Tudors and complete the internet scavenger sheet.

Combine the information each group has found to create a Tudor factfile.

Using the information which has been gathered and shared, children to create a postcard from the prince to the pauper describing what his life is like. Children to design the front of the postcard and use Word to write the back.

Can children make inferences about the lives of rich Tudors from a variety of sources?

Can children find out about the lives of rich Tudors from a variety of sources, including the Internet?

Can children recall information from the story and relate it to the information they have found to create a postcard?

Entertainment

Clothing

Health

Hygiene

Wealthy

Pastimes

Farthingale

Jousting, Falconry, Hunting

Doublet, Hose, Ruff

Success Criteria:

All children should:

Be able to identify how rich Tudors lived and design and make a postcard from the prince to the pauper.

Most children should:

Be able to identify how rich Tudors lived, using information on clothing, entertainment, food, health and hygiene to design and make a postcard from the prince to the pauper.

Some children should:

Be able to identify how rich Tudors lived and design and make a postcard from the prince to the pauper, making inferences about their life as a rich prince based on the information they have discovered and explain differences between life as a rich Tudor to life as a poor Tudor.

Year 3 History

Rich and Poor Tudors

Lesson 7 of 7

Cross Curricular Links:

Literacy- role play drama based on what the children have learnt throughout unit.

Speaking and listening.

Learning Objective:

To be able to compare the lives of rich and poor Tudors and compare to our modern day living in Britain today.

National Curriculum Objectives:

Resources:

H4a- how to find out about the events, people and changes studied from an appropriate range of sources of information, including ICT-based sources [for example, documents, printed sources, CD-ROMS, databases, pictures and photographs, music, artefacts, historic buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites

H5b- use dates and historical vocabulary to describe the periods studied

H5c- communicate their knowledge and understanding of history in a variety of ways

Interactive whiteboard grid.

Category cards to determine which role play each group has to prepare.

Replica Tudor props for role plays.

End of unit Tudor quiz.

Activities:

Assessment:

Vocabulary:

Recap on learning- in groups, children to discuss and write in a thought cloud what they would and would not like about living in Tudor times. Ask children to discuss and compare the main differences between how the Tudors lived and what it is like to live in Britain today.

Record the information we have learnt onto a grid on IWB.

Using category card, children to prepare short role plays in groups to show what that category was like for rich or poor Tudors. Perform to class. Compare and contrast.

End of unit Tudor quiz.

Can children identify some of the differences between rich and poor Tudors and are they able to demonstrate this through acting out a particular role?

Can children recognize the main advantages/disadvantages of being a rich or poor Tudor?

Quiz- assess children’s overall knowledge

Recap on all the vocabulary discussed throughout the unit. Are children able to recall new vocabulary learnt? Quiz

Success Criteria:

All children should:

Be able to complete a mindmap on the worksheet and state what they already know about the Tudors, supported by the teaching assistant.

Most children should:

Be able to place the Tudors on a historical timeline and complete a mindmap on the worksheet, stating what they already know about the Tudors.

Some children should:

Be able to place the Tudors on a historical timeline and complete a mindmap on the worksheet, stating what they know about the Tudors, how life in Tudor times would have been different to life today and what they think the main differences were between rich and poor Tudors.


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