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Feeder School For Isolated Home Education Essay

Understanding what the word perimeter means. Then followed by estimating and recording measurements, and then converting them between (millimetres, centimetres, and metres).

Development (What is it that the children will DO during a normal lesson period):

The children will first start with a brief discussion on definitions. Then they will be put into cooperative groups, where they will be going out into the playground and selecting items of interest which they will be measuring its perimeter. The data will be recorded on a sheet of paper provided by the teacher listed with four rows; the first row having the item, second row being the estimated measurement, third row having the real measurements in centimetres, fourth row having the conversion to millimetres and also to metres of the initial measurement.

Conclusion (How will you and the children round off the lesson?):

Groups will provide their sheet to two other groups where it will be double and triple checked.

Learning outcomes

A)

*Coeducational school

*Large country town

*Mostly boarding students

*Feeder school for isolated/home

*Learning in early years (Year 7) (Mixed SES)

B) Length

MS2.1 Estimates, measures, compares and records lengths, distances and perimeters in metres, centimetres and millimetres (http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_sc/pdf_doc/mathematics_710_syllabus.pdf) (Page 120)

C)

The class will be focusing on measuring perimeters and converting between units, for example millimetres to cm or millimetres to metres.

D)

The learning theory that I will apply is the constructivist theory

E)

Understanding what the word perimeter means. Then followed by estimating and recording measurements, and then converting them between (millimetres, centimetres, and metres).

The children will first start with a brief discussion on definitions. Then they will be put into cooperative groups, where they will be going out into the playground and selecting items of interest which they will be measuring its perimeter. The data will be recorded on a sheet of paper provided by the teacher listed with four rows; the first row having the item, second row being the estimated measurement, third row having the real measurements in centimetres, fourth row having the conversion to millimetres and also to metres of the initial measurement.

Groups will provide their sheet to two other groups where it will be double and triple checked.

Justification of lesson based on student needs

Co-educational school:

Students from co-educational schools can be affected by general stereotypes, especially in the field of mathematics where it can hinder their learning. Abigail Norfleet James and Herbert Richards (2003, as cited in NASSPE) show that a study conducted by the University of Virginia, proclaims that “single-sex schools break down gender stereotypes. Co-ed schools reinforce gender stereotypes” (2003). Although the school is co-educational, cooperative groups will be divided by gender.

Mixed SES:

In regards to mixed SES in the classroom setting, I will observe each student as an individual rather than a whole class. Sheldon Rothman (2003) has stated that educational programs in the past are no longer influential due to the impact of socio economic students in random schools; hence, it is now required to work with individuals (p. 9). It has been stated that, “high-SES backgrounds show higher average levels of achievement on test scores and stay in school longer than students with low-SES backgrounds” (2005 as cited in Woolfolk, A., & Margetts, K., 2010, p. 190).

Rural:

An issue that needs attention is the lack of understanding rural Maths teachers have of the environment they work in, as stated by Bush, S.W. (2005, p. 2), who said “the mathematics that many students learn is connected to neither them nor their community”, which is why cooperative groups will be used. This will ensure that students can support each other by explaining examples of their own, also this will help the teacher keep up to date with what is more effective in class.

JUSTIFICATION OF TEACHING PRACTICE/STRATEGIES

Coeducational school:

Gender stereotypes are an issue as stated by Woolfolk, A., & Margetts, K. (2010), “Stereotypes which impact on discrimination are perpetuated in many ways, some obvious, some subtle”, this will be avoided through the use of cooperative groups, and also by constant observation of progress within the groups.

Mixed SES:

Promoting productive working in a group is an effective approach to resolving the issues with mixed SES students. The constructivist theory will be used to put students into cooperative groups. These students will be learners and also supporters of each other. It has been commented by Gillies, M.R. (2004, p. 15) that “providing children with the opportunity to work cooperatively together on a regular basis in structured cooperative groups encourages students to be more involved with each other, to actively promote each other’s learning”. It has also been stated by Gillies (2004) that once in cooperative groups they are more “likely to feel more committed to the group and more willing to promote its goals”, thus in return promoting the group gains rather than individuals.

Rural:

The method of teaching to avoid the problem created by rural teachers will be by introducing what is called ‘ethnomathematics’. The term ethno stated by D’Ambrosio, U. (1984, as cited in Bush, S.B., 2005, p. 3) as being “all of the ingredients that make up the cultural identity of a group – language, codes, values, jargon, beliefs, food and dress, habits, and physical traits”, which the word as a whole is described by Bush, S.B. (2005, p. 3) as “the ways varied cultures develop and use mathematics”. This method of teaching has shown students how to strategize to relate questions to their own setting in order for it to be more interactive.

DESCRIBE THE MOTIVATIONAL NEEDS OF THE GROUP

Age:

Age related issues for year 7 students will mainly be consistent of problems that arise from the transition from primary school to high school. It is stated by Barone, Aguirre-Deandreis, & Trickett (1991, as cited in Mizelle, N.B., 2000) “As young adolescents make the transition into high school, many experience a decline in grades and attendance; they view themselves more negatively and experience an increased need for friendships. (Hertzog et al., 1996, as cited in Mizelle, N.B., 2000)

Gender:

It is understood that not one motivational style is going to suit both genders. As stated by Feingold (1994, as cited in Ferrara, M.M., 2005, p. 7), observed that “girls tend to set a higher standard in their classroom performance. Consequently, they self-evaluate their performance more critically”. However it is has been said by Pomerantz, Alterman, & Saxon. (2002, as cited in Ferrara, M., M., 2005, p. 7) that “with high standards, girls tend to have lower self-esteems as they tend to be excessively critical in evaluating their own academic performance. Males, on the other hand, tend to have unrealistic estimates of their academic performance”. The goal of the teacher is to help students look more critically at personal learning goals and to evaluate themselves realistically.

Mixed SES:

To understand the motivational needs of this issue we must clarify the difference of each SES level. For example, Eamon (2005, as cited in, Barry, J., p. 28) has stated that “low socio economic status prevents access to resources and leads to additional stress and conflicts at home that affect all aspects of a child’s life including academic achievement”, making it obvious that the school environment is only a partial side to the source of students motivation in learning, but once at school it needs to be as interactive as possible for the student.

DESCRIBE AND JUSTIFY MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES

Age:

The socio-cultural theory relates to the issue stated in question four, where students will fit in by socialising in cooperative groups, sharing ideas and questions. It is stated by Woolfolk, A., & Margetts, K. (2010, p. 382) that for this to be effective, students need to be participating members of the group setting because motivation comes from identity and identity comes from legitimate participation.

Gender:

The gender difference in motivation has its challenges but, once the needs are exposed and understood, it can be targeted and constantly nurtured. It has been commented by Ferrara (2005, p. 7) that, “the goal of the teacher is to help students look more critically at personal learning goals and to evaluate themselves realistically”. In other words, this will help students ascertain a balanced perspective so they don’t face psychological concerns, making them more effective in evaluating their own progress. It is also said by Warrington & Younger (2001, as cited in Bryan, R.,R., 2009, p. 19), that “females’ learn best in cooperative learning environments, while males learn best in competitive learning environments”. Therefore, utilising cooperative groups with the same gender will promote the students motivation.

Mixed SES:

The issue of having a mixed SES class will mainly be determined with the critical state of low SES students. It has been stated by Eamon (2005, as cited in, Barry, J., p. 8) that “low SES negatively affects academic achievement because low SES prevents access to vital resources and creates additional stress at home”. Therefore there is a need of material to be handed out to take home, specifically detailing most important material to be understood for the day in class and also classroom interaction as stated in questions four. It is required that students avoid falling into a state of apathy, which stated by Woolfolk, A., & Margetts, K. (2010), “apathy is a logical reaction to failure if students believe the causes are stable, unlikely to change, and beyond their control. This will leave students in a position where “they believe nothing and no one can help” (Woolfolk & Margetts, 2010) them.

EXPLAIN WHY THIS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED A ‘WICKED PROBLEM’.

Define a ‘wicked problem’?

As stated in an article written by Austin Center for Design, “A wicked problem is a form of social or cultural problem that is difficult to solve because of incomplete, contradictory, and changing requirements”, these can be for example health, sustainability and poverty.

Why when selecting strategies in the different environments these are a ‘wicked problem’?

The strategies may just only be a resolution for a set period or phase, there is no final solution to a ‘wicked problem’. They should only be used if there is an effect created, if there isn’t, various other strategies should be used.

What conclusions can you draw out of this as a future teacher?

That as a future to be I need to be aware of ‘wicked problems’ that relate to the students directly and indirectly. So that awareness is passed on through the generations of such issues. Also as a teacher I am aware that students, for example over weight will be in my class and that I will need to create awareness directly to them. A teacher should always be able to find alternatives to class problems which may arise from students that fall into a ‘wicked problem’, in order to make it a more effective classroom.


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